• The Weekly ARRL Letter

    From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Aug 23 17:32:48 2019
    The ARRL Letter
    August 22, 2019

    * Candidates for ARRL Directors and Vice Directors Announced
    * FCC Dismisses ARRL, AMSAT Requests in Small Satellite Proceeding
    * Ending the Great Radio Silence after "The Great War"
    * So Now What? Podcast
    * WWV Centennial Committee to Conduct Trial Run of WW0WWV Special
    Event
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * ARRL Contest and DXCC Rules Now Prohibit Automated Contacts
    * Radio Amateurs in India Support Rescue and Relief Operations in the
    Face of Flooding
    * 2-Meter Sharing Proposal is on CEPT Conference Preparatory Group
    Agenda
    * Questions Raised About Current Process for Awarding the E.T.
    Krenkel Medal
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    Candidates for ARRL Directors and Vice Directors Announced

    Two races for the office of ARRL Director and one contest for Vice
    Director are set for this fall. In the Southeastern Division, incumbent
    Director Greg Sarratt, W4OZK, faces a challenge from Mickey Baker,
    N4MB. A three-way race is set for the office of Southeastern Division
    Vice Director, with incumbent Joseph Tiritilli, N4ZUW, facing James
    Schilling, KG4JSZ, and Jeff Stahl, K4BH.

    In the West Gulf Division, incumbent John Stratton, N5AUS, faces a
    challenge from Madison Jones, W5MJ. Seats for Director and Vice
    Director in three other ARRL Divisions are unchallenged, with
    incumbents running for election in all but one case: In the
    Southwestern Division, Mark Weiss, K6FG, is running unopposed for the
    seat being vacated by Ned Stearns, AA7A. All candidates having no
    opposition have been declared elected.

    The candidates are:

    Pacific Division

    Director

    Jim Tiemstra, K6JAT

    Vice Director

    Kristen McIntyre, K6WX

    Rocky Mountain Division

    Director

    Jeff Ryan, K0RM

    Vice Director

    Robert Wareham, N0ESQ

    Southeastern Division

    Director

    Greg Sarratt, W4OZK

    Mickey Baker, N4MB

    Vice Director

    James Schilling, KG4JSZ

    Jeff Stahl, K4BH

    Joseph Tiritilli, N4ZUW

    Southwestern Division

    Director

    Richard Norton, N6AA

    Vice Director

    Mark Weiss, K6FG

    West Gulf Division

    Director

    John R. Stratton, N5AUS

    Madison Jones, W5MJ

    Vice Director

    Lee Cooper, W5LHC

    In Divisions where more than one candidate is seeking the same
    position, full members in that Division in good standing as of
    September 10, 2019, will have the opportunity to cast ballots. Official
    paper ballots and candidates' statements will be mailed no later than
    October 1, 2019, to members who are eligible to vote.

    Completed ballots must be received at the address on the envelope
    provided by noon Eastern Time on Friday, November 15, 2019, when
    ballots will be counted at ARRL Headquarters and successful candidates
    announced.
    FCC Dismisses ARRL, AMSAT Requests in Small Satellite Proceeding

    An FCC Report and Order (R&O) released August 2 in the so-called "small
    satellite" rulemaking proceeding, IB Docket 18-86, failed to address
    concerns expressed by ARRL and AMSAT. Both organizations filed comments
    on the FCC Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) in the proceeding last
    year, seeking changes in the FCCs interpretations and procedures
    affecting satellites operating on Amateur Satellite Service
    frequencies.

    "These comments address topics outside the scope of this proceeding,
    and we decline to adopt any of the requested rule modifications or
    updates at this time," the FCC said in the R&O. The FCC did mention
    amateur satellites in its 2018 NPRM, explaining what they are and
    describing the documentation and authorization process, but it did not
    solicit comments.

    "The Commission did not seek comment in the NPRM on any modifications
    or updates to the rules governing Experimental or amateur satellite
    licensing. The streamlined Part 25 small satellite process adopted in
    the Order is an alternative to existing license processes and does not
    replace or modify the authorization procedures for satellites currently
    contained in Parts 5, 25, or 97 of the Commission's rules," the FCC
    explained. "Nevertheless, we received a number of comments in response
    to the NPRM, particularly regarding the rules applicable to amateur
    satellite operations, suggesting that aspects of those rules be
    improved or clarified."

    In its 2018 NPRM, the FCC had said, "Because the type of operations
    that qualify as amateur [is] narrowly defined, an amateur satellite
    authorization will not be appropriate for many small satellite
    operations."

    In its 2018 comments, ARRL said it wanted the FCC to preclude
    exploitation of amateur spectrum by commercial small-satellite users
    authorized under Part 5 Experimental rules and suggested that the FCC
    adopt a "a bright line test" to define and distinguish satellites that
    should be permitted to operate under Amateur Satellite rules.

    ARRL's position was to support and encourage college and university
    Amateur Radio experiments where the sponsor of the experiment is a
    licensed radio amateur and all operation in amateur spectrum is
    compliant with Part 97. Part 5 Experimental authorizations for
    satellites intended to operate in amateur allocations by non-amateur
    sponsors should be discouraged, absent a compelling show of need, ARRL
    told the FCC. AMSAT's comments reflected many of the same concerns that
    ARRL had expressed. Read more. -- Thanks to Ray Soifer, W2RS, for his
    assistance.

    Ending the Great Radio Silence after "The Great War"

    Practical wireless was still in its infancy at the turn of the 20th
    century and unregulated experimentation rampant. Chaos reigned on the
    airwaves. Given the technology of the day -- spark gap transmitters
    that emitted very, very broad signals -- interference was a problem. As
    Al Brogdon, W1AB, explains in "The World War I Shutdown," in the
    September 2019 issue of QST (p. 70), hams, passenger ships, and the US
    Navy were the main users of wireless, and the Navy went to Congress in
    an unsuccessful effort to wrest control over radio and, effectively,
    abolish ham radio in the US. Radio amateurs opposing the bill had an
    ally in the Marconi Company.

    When the US in 1917 joined the European conflict that became World War
    I, the federal government ordered hams to disassemble their stations,
    lower their antennas, and not use transmitters or receivers. Many hams
    who joined the military took their own radio gear along, because, as
    Brogdon explains, "the military didn't have enough radio equipment."

    The end of the war did not mean the resumption of Amateur Radio. Hams
    were allowed to use their receivers again but not transmit. The Navy
    was still in charge of all US radio communications, and another bill
    introduced in Congress proposed handing over ongoing control of all
    radio to the Navy.

    ARRL First President Hiram Percy
    Maxim, W1AW.

    Publication of QST also ceased during the war, and many hams had let
    their ARRL memberships lapse for the duration. ARRL officers and key
    members dug into their own wallets to thwart the bill, mailing a
    "Little Blue Card" to members urging them to ask their congressional
    representatives to oppose the Navy proposal. ARRL President Hiram Percy
    Maxim went to Washington to speak against the bill, which died in
    committee.

    It was not until 1919 -- amid another Navy effort to gain control over
    radio that was stalled by opposition from hams and others -- that the
    transmitting ban was lifted by an act of Congress. As Brogdon explains,
    "Maxim went to Washington again and found a sympathetic ear in
    Massachusetts Congressman William Greene, who ultimately introduced the
    successful House Joint Resolution 217, which asked the Navy 'to remove
    the restrictions on the use and operation of Amateur Radio stations
    throughout the United States.'"

    Hams were back on the air by the fall of 1919 -- 100 years ago!
    So Now What? Podcast

    "Contesting," with ARRL Contest Program Manager, Paul Bourque, N1SFE,
    will be the focus of the new (August 22) episode of the So Now What?
    podcast for Amateur Radio newcomers.

    If you're a newly licensed Amateur Radio operator, chances are you have
    lots of questions. This biweekly podcast has answers! So Now What?
    offers insights from those who've been just where you are now. New
    episodes will be posted every other Thursday, alternating new-episode
    weeks with the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast.

    So Now What? is sponsored by LDG Electronics, a family owned and
    operated business with laboratories in southern Maryland that offers a
    wide array of antenna tuners and other Amateur Radio products.

    ARRL Communications Content Producer Michelle Patnode, W3MVP, and ARRL
    Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, co-host the podcast. Presented as a
    lively conversation, with Patnode representing newer hams and Carcia
    the veteran operators, the podcast will explore questions that newer
    hams may have and the issues that keep participants from staying active
    in the hobby. Some episodes will feature guests to answer questions on
    specific topic areas.

    Listeners can find So Now What? on Apple iTunes, Blubrry, Stitcher
    (free registration required, or browse the site as a guest) and through
    the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. Episodes
    will be archived on the ARRL website.

    WWV Centennial Committee to Conduct Trial Run of WW0WWV Special Event

    The WWV Centennial Committee will conduct a trial run of special event
    station WW0WWV over the August 24 - 25 weekend in advance of the event
    a little more than a month away. WW0WWV will be set up adjacent to the
    WWV transmitter site in Fort Collins, Colorado. WWV turns 100 years old
    on October 1.

    "We'll be testing band and notch filtering, in an attempt to reign in
    the extreme RF environment created by WWV and WWVB," said Dave Swartz,
    W0DAS, of the Northern Colorado Amateur Radio Club (NCARC). The special
    event is being organized in conjunction with the WWV Amateur Radio Club
    and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), which
    operates WWV/WWVH/WWVB. The special event site is within 1/3 of a mile
    of all six WWV transmitters and the 50 kW WWVB transmitter.

    "On-air tests will start Saturday afternoon, August 24, and run through
    Sunday, August 25," Swartz said.

    Greg Ella, N0EMP, uses a 10 MHz loop
    to monitor the broadcast signal of
    WWV at the site of the special event
    station. He was able to measure the
    drift of a GPS disciplined
    oscillator (GPSDO) to about 1 Hz in
    90 seconds against the 10 MHz WWV
    carrier.

    The WWV Centennial special event is set to run from September 28
    through October 2, and round-the-clock operation will take place on CW,
    SSB, and digital modes. Operations will shift among HF bands following
    typical propagation and will include 160 meters as well as satellites
    (SO-50, AO-91, and AO-92) and 6-meter meteor scatter. Up to four
    stations will be on the air for routine operations. A fifth station
    will schedule contacts with schools, universities, and museums, as well
    as conducting unscheduled contacts. The additional station will
    periodically broadcast an AM carrier from a radio locked with WWV's 10
    MHz signal.

    Members of the Amateur Radio industry have contributed equipment,
    including radios, amplifiers, and antennas. Visit the WWV Centennial
    Committee website to see how you can contribute or get involved. Read
    more.
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: Spotless days continue this week,
    with the count of consecutive days without sunspots standing at 15 days
    as of August 21, according to Spaceweather.com. Note that 1954 had more
    spotless days than 2018, and it was just prior to Cycle 19, the biggest
    in recorded history.

    Average daily solar flux was virtually unchanged -- from 67.4 last week
    to 67.5 this week. Average daily planetary A index edged lower, from
    6.3 to 4.4. Predicted solar flux looks to remain steady: 67 on August
    22 - September 11; 68 on September 12 - 21, and 67 on September 22 -
    October 5.

    The planetary A index forecast: 5 on August 22 - 26; 8 on August 27 -
    28 and 5 on August 29 - 31. Then, with a recurring coronal hole, 38 and
    14 on September 1 - 2; 5 on September 3 - 5; 8 on September 6 - 7; 5 on
    September 8 - 15; 7 on September 16 - 17; 6 on September 18; 5 on
    September 19 - 21; 8 on September 22 - 24 and 5 on September 25 - 27.
    With the return of that coronal hole, 38 and 14 on September 28 - 29; 5
    on September 30 - October 2; 8 on October 3 - 4, and 5 on October 5.

    Sunspot numbers for August 15 - 21 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0, with a
    mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 67.6, 67.5, 68, 67.5, 67.7,
    67.3, and 66.8, with a mean of 67.5. Estimated planetary A indices were
    4, 5, 4, 6, 4, 4, and 4, with a mean of 4.4. Middle latitude A index
    was 4, 6, 6, 7, 4, 7, and 5, with a mean of 5.6.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------


    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * August 24 - 25 -- ALARA Contest (CW, phone)
    * August 24 - 25 -- W/VE Islands QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * August 24 - 25 -- SCC RTTY Championship
    * August 24 - 25 -- YO DX HF Contest (CW, phone)
    * August 24 - 25 -- Kansas QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * August 24 - 25 -- YARC QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * August 24 - 25 -- Ohio QSO Party (CW, phone)
    * August 24 - 25 -- CVA DX Contest, SSB
    * August 24 - 25 -- 50 MHz Fall Sprint (CW, phone, digital)
    * August 24 - 26 -- Hawaii QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * August 25 -- SARL HF CW Contest
    * August 28 -- SKCC Sprint CW

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    ARRL Contest and DXCC Rules Now Prohibit Automated Contacts

    ARRL has incorporated changes to the rules for all ARRL-sponsored
    contests and DXCC, prohibiting automated contacts and requiring that an
    actual operator is initiating and carrying out a contact. These changes
    also apply to Worked All States (including Triple Play and 5-Band WAS),
    Fred Fish W5FF Memorial, and VUCC awards. The changes are effective
    immediately and affect the rules for both HF contests, and VHF/UHF
    contests as well as DXCC.

    A resolution at the July ARRL Board of Directors meeting pointed to
    "growing concern over fully automated contacts being made and claimed"
    for contest and for DXCC credit. The rules now require that each
    claimed contact include contemporaneous direct initiation by the
    operator on both sides of the contact. Initiation of a contact may
    either be local or remote.

    Radio Amateurs in India Support Rescue and Relief Operations in the
    Face of Flooding

    Radio amateurs in at least three western Indian states along the coast
    of the Arabian Sea are pitching in to support communication for rescue
    and relief operations following heavy rainfall and flooding. In Kerala,
    Shyam Kumar, VU2JLE, told The Hindu newspaper that he and 15 other
    radio amateurs belonging to the Wayanad Hams (WHAMS) group have been
    closely monitoring to help the government rescue and relief teams get
    to marooned localities. News accounts say more heavy rain is expected
    in many parts of India, bringing with it the threat of flooding.
    Monsoon rains have been falling for weeks, and more than 270 people
    have died, about half of them in Kerala.

    In Maharashtra, Amateur Radio and drones have been supplementing relief
    and rescue teams dealing with heavy flooding there. Rescue teams were
    reported to be using ham radio to pass information into a network. Some
    hams have come in from outside the region to assist. Members of the
    National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) and the military have been
    transporting supplies to some 5,000 people stranded in various
    locations.

    In the northern part of Karnataka state, radio amateurs from the Indian
    Institute of Hams (IIH) in Bengaluru (Bangalore) and a ham radio club
    consisting of postal department workers were reported to have helped
    rescue and relief operations on August 12.

    IIH Director Shankar Sathyapal, VU2FI, said three radio-equipped
    vehicles fanned out across the region. "This is the second line of
    communication," Sathyapal explained for a report in The Hindu. "Relief
    officers will be provided with walkie-talkies, while each vehicle can
    cover about a radius of around 10 - 15 kilometers, depending on the
    topography." -- Thanks to Southgate Amateur Radio News and media
    reports
    2-Meter Sharing Proposal is on CEPT Conference Preparatory Group Agenda

    The final European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications
    ministrations (CEPT) Conference Preparatory Group (CPG) meeting prior
    to World Radiocommunication Conference 2019 (WRC-19) gets under way on
    August 26. Action at that gathering will determine whether a French
    proposal to have WRC-23 study the sharing of 144 - 146 MHz with the
    Aeronautical Mobile Service (AMS) will be adopted as a CEPT WRC-19
    position. International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) experts will be
    present at the CPG to explain the IARU position on this and other
    topics. The French proposal, raised on short notice at a CEPT meeting
    in June, has riled the Amateur Radio community worldwide and prompted
    petitions to prevent its passage. The proposed 144 - 146 MHz segment
    would be part of a broader consideration of spectrum allocated to the
    Aeronautical Mobile Service.

    IARU has asked its member-societies to explain the Amateur Service's
    concerns over the French proposal to their telecommunications
    regulators, and it has submitted a basic technical analysis showing the
    impracticality of such a proposal. IARU has said much more appropriate
    parts of the spectrum are available to study for non-safety AMS
    applications.

    Another issue addressed during the June CEPT meeting concerned the
    sharing of the Amateur Radio 1240 - 1300 MHz band with Europe's Galileo
    GPS system. IARU has asked its member-societies to discuss with
    regulators the best way to resolve concerns regarding a few cases of
    Amateur Radio interference to the Galileo navigation system specific to
    its E6 subband at 1260 - 1300 MHz.

    Documents for the CEPT Conference Preparatory Group meeting are
    available via the CEPT website. Read more.
    Questions Raised About Current Process for Awarding the E.T. Krenkel
    Medal

    Questions about how the E.T. Krenkel Medal is being awarded, including
    whether recipients have to pay a fee to get the medal, have been
    brought to ARRL's attention.

    In the past, several prominent radio amateurs and organizations --
    including QST -- have been awarded and received the medal without any
    advance notice and without having to provide any information or
    payment.

    ARRL has been advised that in recent months "nominees" have been
    invited essentially to complete their own nomination forms and asked to
    forward a fee for the cost of obtaining the medal, which some nominees
    said they have not received. Regulations for the E.T. Krenkel Medal,
    issued by "LLC Russian Traveler and National Academy of Researches and
    Discoveries," states that the cost of a medal is to be paid by the
    sponsor (individual or organization) nominating a medal recipient. Some
    evidence suggests that sponsor and recipient may now be one and the
    same.

    A small tourism enterprise, LLC Russian Traveler, was reportedly
    liquidated in January but is believed to be operated by a Russian radio
    amateur. A form attached to the Regulations that's designed for an
    organization or individual to nominate an honoree is the one now being
    sent to individuals who have been told they were nominated.

    ARRL takes no official position regarding the current status of E.T
    Krenkel Medal nominations, LLC Russian Traveler, or anyone connected
    with either. ARRL does, however, want to ensure that members are aware
    of the issues that have been called to its attention.
    In Brief...

    Reminder: The Hiram Percy Maxim Birthday Celebration gets under way on
    Saturday, August 31, and wraps up on Monday, September 8. The 9-day
    operating event commemorates the 150th anniversary of the birth of ARRL
    cofounder and first president Hiram Percy Maxim, W1AW (HPM) -- born on
    September 2, 1869 -- and is open to all radio amateurs. The objective
    is to work as many participating stations as possible. W1AW and all
    ARRL members will append "/150" to their call signs during this event
    (DX operators who are ARRL members may operate as <call sign>/150, if
    permitted by their country of license.) Stations will exchange a signal
    report and ARRL/RAC Section. A total of 84 multipliers are available.
    DX stations will send a signal report and "DX." All Amateur Radio bands
    except 60, 30, 17, and 12 meters are available. Contacts may be made on
    CW, phone, and digital modes. Incentives are available for using
    different modes, operating portable, and using social media, among
    others. Logs will be scored, and downloadable certificates will be
    available. An announcement and complete rules appear in the September
    issue of QST, p. 86.

    A message on WWV is prompting listeners to take a survey about the
    service. Through Saturday, August 24, WWV and WWVH will transmit a US
    Department of Defense (DOD) message in conjunction with the COMEX 19-3
    interoperability exercise in Tennessee. The broadcast also urges
    listeners to complete a survey on WWV/WWVH listenership and listening
    habits. The messages are broadcast on WWV at 10 minutes past the hour
    and on WWVH at 50 minutes past the hour. WWV and WWVH transmit on 2.5,
    5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 MHz. Following a proof of concept this year, DOD
    anticipates making use of the WWV/WWVH broadcast time slot full time,
    all year. Read more.

    Joseph
    Areyzaga,
    K1JGA.

    A close friend of a radio amateur who died in a recent tower-related
    accident has contacted ARRL with additional observations. Joseph
    Areyzaga, K1JGA (photo), died in the July 27 incident, and the tower's
    owner was seriously injured. The individual reported that Areyzaga and
    Mike Rancourt, K1EEE -- the tower's owner -- were in the process of
    lowering one of the antennas when the tower tipped over. The friend
    said the tower was genuine Rohn 25, with a genuine Rohn BPH25 hinge
    plate, and that the apparent -- but not proven -- failure point was not
    obvious while the tower was still standing. All three pier posts on the
    hinge plate broke off, with the tower section bolts still intact and in
    place, he reported. No official determination has been made as to the
    specific cause of the failure. Rancourt, who was seriously injured in
    the incident, remains hospitalized but is said to be recovering well.

    Ulrich L. Rohde, N1UL, has been named as an Honorary Fellow of India's
    Institution of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineers (IETE). The
    IETE's Governing Council bestowed the honor on the noted researcher.
    The IETE is a prominent professional society in the field of
    electronics, telecommunication computer science/engineering,
    broadcasting, information technology, and related areas. The Honorary
    Fellowship is accorded to an eminent individual in the fields of
    science, technology, education, and industry. A presentation ceremony
    will be held during the 62nd annual IETE Convention in late September
    in India.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * August 24 -- Society of Midwest Contesters Specialty Convention,
    Normal, Illinois
    * August 23 - 25 -- West Virginia State Convention, Weston, West
    Virginia
    * September 6 - 7 -- Arkansas State Convention, Mena, Arkansas
    * September 6 - 7 -- Wyoming State Convention, Gillette, Wyoming
    * September 6 - 8 -- New England Division Convention, Boxborough,
    Massachusetts
    * September 7 -- Virginia Section Convention, Virginia Beach,
    Virginia
    * September 13 - 14 -- W9DXCC 2019, St. Charles, Illinois
    * September 21 - 22 -- New Mexico State Convention, Albuquerque, New
    Mexico
    * September 27 - 28 -- Central Division Convention, Milwaukee,
    Wisconsin
    * September 28 -- Dakota Division Convention, West Fargo, North
    Dakota
    * September 28 -- Washington State Convention, Spokane Valley,
    Washington
    * October 6 -- Iowa State Convention, West Liberty, Iowa
    * October 11 - 12 -- PNWVHFS Conference and Meeting, Issaquah,
    Washington
    * October 11 - 12 -- Florida State Convention, Melbourne, Florida
    * October 13 -- Connecticut State Convention, Meriden, Connecticut
    * October 18 - 19 -- Delta Division Convention, East Ridge, Tennessee
    * October 18 - 20 -- Pacific Division Convention, San Ramon,
    California
    * October 19 -- 21st Wisconsin ARES/RACES Conference, Wisconsin
    Rapids, Wisconsin
    * October 26 -- South Carolina Section Convention, Conway, South
    Carolina

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

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    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Sep 13 09:05:14 2019
    The ARRL Letter
    September 12, 2019

    * ARRL and IARU President Emeritus Larry Price, W4RA, SK
    * FCC Proposes to Make All Universal Licensing System Filings
    Electronic
    * Unraveling the Mystery of 1 * 1 Call Signs
    * The Doctor Will See You Now!
    * Hurricane Watch Net Sets New Activation Record during Dorian
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * Dayton Hamvention Signs 5-Year Contract with Greene County Expo
    Center
    * UN Headquarters' 4U1UN Making Slow but Steady Progress in Returning
    to Air
    * YOTA 2019 Summer Camp in Bulgaria Spawns Subregional Camps
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    ARRL and IARU President Emeritus Larry Price, W4RA, SK

    ARRL and International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) President Emeritus
    Larry E. Price, W4RA, of Statesboro, Georgia, died on September 10. An
    ARRL Life Member, he was 85. Price was licensed in 1951 at age 16 as
    WN5TIA, one of the first Novice licenses issued in the US. A US Army
    veteran, Price held BSEE, MBA, and doctoral degrees. He spent most of
    his career as a professor of finance and economics at Georgia Southern
    University.

    Elected as ARRL Southeastern Division Vice Director in 1973, Price
    became Director later that year and was elected as an ARRL Vice
    President by the Board of Directors in 1980. In 1983 he became First
    Vice President following the death of ARRL President Vic Clark, W4KFC,
    and was elected President by the Board the following year.

    He served as ARRL President for 8 years, serving simultaneously as IARU
    Secretary from 1989 until 1992, and continuing as IARU Secretary and
    ARRL International Affairs Vice President until his election as IARU
    President in 1999, a post he held for 10 years. The IARU ministrative
    Council named him President Emeritus upon his retirement in 2009. The
    ARRL Board named him ARRL President Emeritus in 2011.

    "His accomplishments as President of ARRL and the IARU are too many to
    list, but neither organization would be what it is today without his
    vision, dedication, and hard work," said former ARRL CEO David Sumner,
    K1ZZ, who now serves as IARU Secretary. "We all owe a great debt to
    Larry and his family for their many sacrifices on our behalf."

    IARU President Tim Ellam, VE6SH, recalled his many years of association
    with Price. "Amateur Radio...has lost a valued colleague today," Ellam
    said. "Larry Price was the dean of the IARU, and under his leadership
    the organization not only achieved great success for the Amateur Radio
    services but the respect of those we work with in the International
    Telecommunication Union (ITU). His work and tenacity on a number of
    issues gave the IARU the admiration of many administrations and senior
    leadership at the ITU, which we continue to enjoy today."

    In 2014, Dayton Hamvention^(R) honored Price as Amateur of the Year. At
    the ARRL Centennial Convention that same year, Price was awarded the
    ARRL Medal of Honor. Read more. -- Thanks to David Sumner, K1ZZ
    FCC Proposes to Make All Universal Licensing System Filings Electronic

    The FCC is seeking comment on a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM)
    that is part of an overall plan to transition completely to electronic
    filing, licenses, authorizations, and correspondence. The notice
    proposes to make all filings to the Universal Licensing System (ULS)
    electronic, expand electronic filing and correspondence elements for
    related systems, and require applicants to provide an email address on
    the FCC forms related to these systems. Although much of the FCC's ULS
    filings are already electronic, the changes suggested in the NPRM (in
    WT Docket No. 19-212) would require all Amateur Radio Service
    applications to be filed electronically. Under current rules, Amateur
    Radio applications may still be filed manually, except those filed by
    Volunteer Examiner Coordinators (VECs).

    "Given the drastic changes that have occurred with regard to the
    ubiquity of the internet and increased personal computer access, we
    find it unlikely that electronic filing remains infeasible or
    cost-prohibitive for the previously exempted types of filers, or that
    they lack resources to file electronically," the FCC said in the NPRM,
    released on September 6. "We therefore propose to eliminate Section
    1.913's exemptions to mandatory electronic filing."

    The FCC said that while the vast majority of ULS applications today are
    submitted electronically, some are still manually filed, largely from
    exempted filers, such as radio amateurs. Last year, the FCC received
    some 5,000 manually filed applications out of a total of some 425,000.
    The FCC is seeking comment on whether its underlying assumptions about
    the ease of electronic filing for previously exempted filers are valid.

    This NPRM also seeks comment on additional rule changes that would
    further expand the use of electronic filing and electronic service. The
    FCC stopped providing printed Amateur Radio license documents in 2015.

    "Together, these proposals will facilitate the remaining steps to
    transition these systems from paper to electronic, reducing regulatory
    burdens and environmental waste, and making interaction with these
    systems more accessible and efficient for those who rely on them," the
    FCC said.

    Comments are due within 30 days of the NPRM's release.

    Unraveling the Mystery of 1 * 1 Call Signs

    The 1 * 1 Special Event Call Signs system offers a way for clubs,
    groups, or even individuals to use a short call sign of special
    significance to the amateur community. These 1 * 1 call signs are
    reserved in advance for use in conjunction with short-term special
    events and commemorative operations. The FCC does not assign 1 * 1 call
    signs, so they are not "official."

    On the matter of special event call signs, the FCC says, in Section
    97.3(a)(11)(iii) of the Amateur Service rules: "The call sign is
    selected by the station licensee from a list of call signs shown on a
    common database coordinated, maintained and disseminated by the amateur
    station special event call sign data base coordinators. The call sign
    must have the single letter prefix K, N, or W, followed by a single
    numeral 0 through 9, followed by a single letter A through W or Y or Z
    (for example K1A). The special event call sign is substituted for the
    call sign shown on the station license grant while the station is
    transmitting."

    The FCC also says in Section 97.119 (d): "ditionally, the station
    must transmit its assigned call sign at least once per hour during such
    transmissions." This requirement tends to be widely flouted, however.

    A 1 * 1 Special Event Call Sign aids other radio amateurs by calling
    attention to the special event or other occasion. 1 * 1 call signs may
    be used for a variety of purposes, such as conventions, festivals,
    dedications, anniversaries, commemorations, and ARRL Field Day. Even
    local events qualify.

    There are 750 1 * 1 Special Event Call Sign possibilities, and radio
    amateurs of any license class may reserve one as far as a year in
    advance to use for up to 15 days. Of course, 1 * 1 Special Event Call
    Signs are recycled. It's first come, first served. See the Frequently
    Asked Questions page for more information.

    The FCC has selected coordinators to approve and post 1 * 1 Special
    Event Call Sign reservations to a searchable database. -- Thanks to The
    Radiogram (Portage County Amateur Radio Society newsletter)
    The Doctor Will See You Now!

    "Coaxial Cable Connectors" is the topic of the new (September 12)
    episode of the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast. Listen...and learn!

    Sponsored by DX Engineering, ARRL The Doctor is In is an informative
    discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet, or
    smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like!

    Every 2 weeks, your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve Ford, WB8IMY, and
    the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, will discuss a broad range of
    technical topics. You can also email your questions to doctor@arrl.org,
    and the Doctor may answer them in a future podcast.

    Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone or
    iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can also
    listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration required,
    or browse the site as a guest) and through the free Stitcher app for
    iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never listened to a podcast
    before, download our beginner's guide.

    Hurricane Watch Net Sets New Activation Record during Dorian

    Hurricane Watch Net (HWN) volunteers set a new record for total hours
    activated during a single storm. The net was active for 157 hours --
    139 hours of which were continuous. HWN Manager Bobby Graves, KB5HAV,
    said the continuous activation record stands at 151 hours for Hurricane
    Matthew in 2018.

    "During this marathon activation, members of the Hurricane Watch Net
    collected and forwarded countless surface reports to the National
    Hurricane Center in Miami," Graves noted.

    After devastating Abaco and Grand Bahama islands with winds clocked at
    200 MPH or more, Dorian made its way slowly toward Florida, before
    sliding up the southeastern US coast and making a second landfall on
    Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. It wasn't over, however. Dorian veered
    out into the Atlantic, affecting New England before hitting Maritime
    Canada, where it knocked out power and downed trees.

    During its lengthy initial activation, the HWN attempted on numerous
    occasions to raise stations in the Bahamas but was unable to contact
    anyone in the most-affected area.

    The HWN activated for the last time during Hurricane Dorian last
    Saturday, as the storm was, by then, speeding up the east coast of the
    US as a Category 1 storm. Poor propagation plagued net operations
    throughout the activation, even right up to the end. At one point,
    propagation was lost between net members and Nova Scotia on 40 meters,
    although the net continued for a while longer on 20 meters.

    Early on, Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES^(R)) volunteers went on
    alert along the US east coast, preparing for the worst. The major
    problem was storm surge-related flooding. Evacuations were ordered
    ahead of the storm.

    The ARRL Headquarters Emergency Response Team convened early on to
    monitor the situation closely. ARRL officials were in regular
    communication with partner agencies, particularly FEMA and the
    Department of Homeland Security. W1AW, which had already planned to be
    in operation for the Hiram Percy Maxim 150th birthday special event,
    remained ready to assist with emergency communications.

    The VoIP Hurricane Net activated over the weekend in conjunction with
    WX4NHC at the National Hurricane Center to keep on top of ground-truth
    weather information.
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: No sunspots this week. The average
    daily sunspot numbers declined from 3.4 to 0. At the same time, the
    average daily solar flux rose from 67.4 to 69.4.

    Geomagnetic activity quieted, with the average daily planetary A index
    declining from 19.9 to 8.9, while the average daily mid-latitude A
    index went from 16.7 to 7.7.

    Predicted solar flux is 68 on September 12 - 22; 69 on September 23 -
    October 5; 68 on October 6 - 19; 69 on October 20 - 24; 68 on October
    25, and 69 on October 26.

    Predicted planetary A index is 5 on September 12 - 22; 8 on September
    23; 5 on September 24 - 25; 10, 35, 45, 20, and 10 on September 26 -
    30; 8, 10, and 8 on October 1 - 3; 5 on October 4 - 19; 8 on October
    20; 5 on October 21 - 22; 8, 25, 30, and 18 on October 23 - 26.

    Sunspot numbers for September 5 - 11, 2019 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and
    0, with a mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 68.3, 68.9, 73.9,
    67.5, 68.8, 70, and 68.1, with a mean of 69.4. Estimated planetary A
    indices were 14, 8, 7, 10, 14, 4, and 5, with a mean of 8.9. Middle
    latitude A index was 11, 9, 6, 9, 11, 4, and 4, with a mean of 7.7.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------


    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * September 14 -- FOC QSO Party (CW)
    * September 14 - 15 -- Worked All Europe DX Contest (SSB)
    * September 14 - 15 -- SARL Field Day Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * September 14 - 15 -- All Texas QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * September 14 - 15 -- Alabama QSO Party (CW, phone)
    * September 14 - 15 -- Russian Cup Digital Contest
    * September 14 - 16 -- ARRL September VHF Contest (CW, phone,
    digital)
    * September 15 -- North American Sprint (RTTY)
    * September 15 - 18 -- Classic Exchange (CW)
    * September 15 -- BARTG Sprint 75 (Digital)
    * September 16 -- Run for the Bacon QRP Contest (CW)
    * September 18 -- RSGB 80-Meter Autumn Series (CW)
    * September 19 -- NAQCC CW Sprint
    * September 20 -- AGB NEMIGA Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL
    Contest Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.

    Dayton Hamvention Signs 5-Year Contract with Greene County Expo Center

    The Dayton Amateur Radio Association (DARA) has signed a 5-year
    agreement to keep Dayton Hamvention^(R) at the Greene County Expo
    Center. The agreement was announced on September 9 by Hamvention
    General Chairman Jack Gerbs, WB8SCT.

    "It has been a wonderful experience working with the Expo Center team
    in the development of this agreement," Gerbs said. "With the 5-year
    agreement signed, the Expo Center and Hamvention can move forward with
    additional enhancements to the facilities."

    Dayton Amateur Radio Association President Ron Cramer, KD8ENJ, said the
    DARA Board, in approving the contract, noted that the relationship with
    the Expo Center and Greene County, the City of Xenia, and Xenia
    Township "has proven especially rewarding." Cramer said, "They all have
    worked hard to make Hamvention a success over the last 3 years. We look
    forward to a great relationship over the next 5 years and beyond."
    Hamvention's 2019 attendance was 32,472 -- the highest recorded since
    the move to the Exposition Center in Xenia in 2017, which was
    coordinated by Cramer, the Hamvention General Chairman in 2017 and
    2018.

    The largest Amateur Radio show in the US, Dayton Hamvention is held the
    third full weekend in May. The dates for 2020 are May 15 - 17.

    UN Headquarters' 4U1UN Making Slow but Steady Progress in Returning to
    Air

    Responding to inquiries noting the lack of 4U1UN activity, the United
    Nations Amateur Radio Club (UNARC) indicated on its Facebook page this
    week that it's making slow but steady progress in its efforts to get a
    station back on the air from UN Headquarters. The main difficulties in
    getting 4U1UN up and running again following its displacement by
    renovations at UN Headquarters have been administrative and
    organizational, the UNARC team said. The club explained that as a
    result of UN Headquarters renovation, the room on the 41st floor
    housing the 4U1UN radio equipment was reallocated to the UN Broadcast
    and Conference Support Section (BCSS) and is now off limits.

    "After the successful activity of 4U70UN back in 2015, with the support
    of the UN ministration, we were able to secure a tiny 20-square-foot
    room for the club's needs on the ground floor of the building," the
    club said in its post. With no opportunity to run a feed line from the
    ground floor to the top of the building and the tenuous hold even on
    the tiny, bottom-floor shack space, the club is in the process of
    installing a remotely controlled station on the 41st floor.

    Over a recent weekend, several UNARC members, representatives of UN
    services, and guests had an opportunity to continue equipment
    configuration. An assembled 19-inch rack and part of the equipment were
    disconnected during delivery to the 41st floor so that BCSS personnel
    could hand-carry the equipment up several flights of stairs to the top
    floor. "After 4 hours of work, the connections of the SteppIR BigIR
    vertical antennas were restored, a new SDA-100 controller was
    installed, and a RemoteRig 1216H was connected for easy remote access,"
    the club post said. "The antenna was tested and configured."

    UNARC says remote access from the 1st floor now works, thanks to a
    separate Ethernet cable run up the entire height of the building for
    UNARC's use. Operation of the ACOM-2000A amplifier also was tested with
    an antenna.

    "We really hope that in the very near future, after debugging and
    setting up all the equipment, we will finally be able to proudly look
    at the work done and begin to appear steadily on the bands," the club
    said.
    YOTA 2019 Summer Camp in Bulgaria Spawns Subregional Camps

    Most of those attending the recent Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) summer
    camp in Bulgaria were first-timers, observed Monty Schebesta, OE3VVU, a
    participant this year. Some 80 young radio amateurs from 27 countries
    convened near Sofia August 11 - 17 to, as he put it, "connect and learn
    from each other." Monty said the successful 2019 summer camp
    demonstrated that YOTA is growing quickly, noting too that 40% of the
    YOTA Summer Camp attendees were young women.

    During the week, campers engaged in a variety of workshops that
    included such activities as building VHF and HF antennas and assembling
    electronic kits, which, for many, meant learning how to solder. Monty
    said the focus of the activities and presentations involved learning
    from each other.

    "YOTA is shifting more and more towards a 'youngsters for youngsters'
    approach, where youngsters teach each other, rather than relying on
    older generations for input," he said. "The main goal of the YOTA
    summer camp is to give youngsters the ideas, knowledge, and experiences
    they require to go back to their home country at the end of the week
    and start their own youth activities."

    Monty said the practical workshops are the mostly easily reproducible,
    so that young radio amateurs could use them to introduce new young
    people into the hobby. "For example," he said, "youngsters might do a
    kit building workshop at a local school or use the antenna built at the
    camp to do a [Summits On The Air] activation together with some new
    youngsters."

    Subregional camps such as those held in Finland, Italy, and Germany in
    recent years are becoming more common in Region 1, with the next set
    for late September in the Czech Republic (OL19CAMP), followed closely
    by a camp in the Netherlands in December.

    He anticipates many other youth teams will want to stage subregional
    YOTA camps of their own. "What the participants learned at the YOTA
    summer camp will be an invaluable resource for organizing subregional
    camps and youth activities on any scale," he concluded.

    Bulgaria's International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) member-society,
    BFRA, sponsored the 2019 YOTA Summer Camp.
    In Brief...

    The IARU recently attended an ITU Inter-Regional Workshop. As part of
    its strategy to support topics related to Amateur Radio at World
    Radiocommunication Conference 2019 (WRC-19), the International Amateur
    Radio Union (IARU) was on hand at the third inter-regional workshop in
    Geneva, Switzerland, this past week. The workshop, attended by member
    states and other International Telecommunication Union (ITU) sector
    members, considered and discussed the positions of the six Regional
    Telecommunication Organizations (RTO) on the main WRC-19 agenda items.
    Attendees also considered how differing regional positions might be
    reconciled during WRC to arrive at consensus. The ITU said the meeting
    would "provide participants with the opportunity to exchange views and
    have a better understanding of the common views, positions and/or
    proposals of the concerned entities." The third ITU Inter-regional
    Workshop on WRC-19 Preparation took place September 4 - 6. Documents
    can be downloaded from the ITU website.

    The roster of presentations and speakers for the 2019 ARRL-TAPR Digital
    Communications Conference (DCC) is now posted on the TAPR website. The
    DCC takes place September 20 - 22 at the Detroit Metro Airport Marriott
    Hotel. Bill Brown, WB8ELK, father of Amateur Radio ballooning and noted
    experimenter and engineer, will be the DCC Saturday evening banquet
    speaker. The Sunday Seminar topic will be "Learn to build and operate
    your own SatNOGS ground station," presented by Dan White, AD0CQ, and
    Corey Shields, KB9JHU. The seminar will be a hands-on, progressive
    tutorial, starting with the basics of a SatNOGS (Satellite Networked
    Open Ground Station) and ending with the development of telemetry
    decoders. Participants should gain an understanding of how SatNOGS
    applications work, how to use them, and a basic familiarity with the
    technologies behind the scenes, should they wish to contribute to the
    development of the project. Participants should bring a laptop and sign
    up for a free account. A room will be set aside for demonstrations,
    experiments, and show-and-tell projects. Tables and power strips will
    be provided.

    Former ARRL Iowa Section Manager Bob McCaffrey, K0CY, of Boone, Iowa,
    died on September 2. An ARRL Life Member, he was 77. McCaffrey served
    twice as Iowa Section Manager -- first, from 1980 until 1986, and again
    from 2013 until 2019, after he declined to run for another term. He
    served in other Iowa ARRL Field Organization positions as well.
    McCaffrey was licensed in 1955 as KN0EJZ. He taught entry-level Amateur
    Radio classes within adult education and served as a Volunteer
    Examiner. He was an AMSAT and Quarter Century Wireless Association
    member and an enthusiastic ARRL Field Day participant. McCaffrey was a
    past president of the Des Moines Radio Amateur Association and of the
    Boone Amateur Radio Club.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * September 13 - 14 -- W9DXCC 2019, St. Charles, Illinois
    * September 21 - 22 -- New Mexico State Convention, Albuquerque, New
    Mexico
    * September 27 - 28 -- Central Division Convention, Milwaukee,
    Wisconsin
    * September 28 -- Dakota Division Convention, West Fargo, North
    Dakota
    * September 28 -- Washington State Convention, Spokane Valley,
    Washington
    * October 6 -- Iowa State Convention, West Liberty, Iowa
    * October 11 - 12 -- PNWVHFS Conference and Meeting, Issaquah,
    Washington
    * October 11 - 12 -- Florida State Convention, Melbourne, Florida
    * October 13 -- Connecticut State Convention, Meriden, Connecticut
    * October 18 - 19 -- Delta Division Convention, East Ridge, Tennessee
    * October 18 - 20 -- Pacific Division Convention, San Ramon,
    California
    * October 19 -- 21st Wisconsin ARES/RACES Conference, Wisconsin
    Rapids, Wisconsin
    * October 26 -- South Carolina Section Convention, Conway, South
    Carolina
    * November 2 - 3 -- Georgia State Convention, Lawrenceville, Georgia
    * November 16 -- Indiana Section Convention, Fort Wayne, Indiana

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

    .

    .
    * Join or Renew Today! ARRL membership includes QST, Amateur Radio's
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    Free of charge to ARRL members...
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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
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    purposes require written permission.


    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Argos@1:135/383 to Sean Dennis on Fri Sep 13 10:34:04 2019
    Thank you for posting ... It is about time this message sub got some traffic.

    ---

    Rocket Town BBS - Telnet: rtbbs.ddns.net
    fsxNET: 21:1/203 FidoNET:1:135/383 - Titusville, FL. NASA SPACE Coast

    --- Mystic BBS v1.12 A43 2019/03/03 (Windows/32)
    * Origin: Rocket Town BBS (1:135/383)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to Argos on Fri Sep 13 17:50:12 2019
    Thank you for posting ... It is about time this message
    sub got some traffic.

    That's an automated posting, by the way.

    Also, if there isn't any traffic, make some. ;)

    73 DE KD5COL,
    Sean
    HAM Moderator


    --- Maximus/2 3.01
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * bbs.outpostbbs.net:2304 (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to Argos on Fri Sep 13 17:51:42 2019
    BTW, this echo is set to real names only. If your BBS can't/won't allow you to
    toggle between real names and aliases, just use your name when closing out the message.

    Thanks!

    73 DE KD5COL,
    Sean


    --- Maximus/2 3.01
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * bbs.outpostbbs.net:2304 (1:18/200)
  • From Argos@1:135/383 to Sean Dennis on Sat Sep 14 08:05:10 2019

    Also, if there isn't any traffic, make some. ;)


    ahh ... good point!

    ---

    Rocket Town BBS - Telnet: rtbbs.ddns.net
    fsxNET: 21:1/203 FidoNET:1:135/383 - Titusville, FL. NASA SPACE Coast

    --- Mystic BBS v1.12 A43 2019/03/03 (Windows/32)
    * Origin: Rocket Town BBS (1:135/383)
  • From Argos@1:135/383 to Sean Dennis on Sat Sep 14 08:06:52 2019

    BTW, this echo is set to real names only. If your BBS can't/won't allow you to toggle between real names and aliases, just use your name when closing out the message.

    I use Mystic .. i will check the Message setting to see if I have Real Names Only selected and make that change

    ---

    Rocket Town BBS - Telnet: rtbbs.ddns.net
    fsxNET: 21:1/203 FidoNET:1:135/383 - Titusville, FL. NASA SPACE Coast

    --- Mystic BBS v1.12 A43 2019/03/03 (Windows/32)
    * Origin: Rocket Town BBS (1:135/383)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Sep 20 09:05:16 2019
    The ARRL Letter
    September 19, 2019

    * ARRL Renews Request for FCC to Replace Symbol Rate with Bandwidth
    Limit
    * Hoc Legislative vocacy Committee to Meet with Lawmakers
    * A Radio on Your Belt -- 1930s Style
    * So Now What? Podcast
    * Amateur Radio Digital Communications Announces Grant to ARISS
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * Festival of Frequency Measurement Set to Honor WWV Centennial
    * Mount Diablo Amateur Radio Club Assisting in Restoring Fire-Damaged
    Repeaters
    * Well-Known Yukon Ham J Allen, VY1JA, is Stepping Away from Amateur
    Radio
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    ARRL Renews Request for FCC to Replace Symbol Rate with Bandwidth Limit

    In ex parte comments filed on September 17 in WT Docket 16-239, ARRL
    renewed its request that the FCC delete symbol rate limits below 29.7
    MHz for data transmissions in the Amateur Service rules. As it did in
    its initial filing, ARRL asked the FCC to couple the removal of the
    symbol rate limits with the adoption of a 2.8 kHz bandwidth limit. In
    response to ARRL's 2013 ARRL Petition for Rulemaking (RM-11708), the
    FCC proposed deleting the symbol rate limits but declined to replace
    them with the 2.8 kHz bandwidth that ARRL wanted.

    "This proceeding addresses an update to the Commission's rules that is
    needed because a limitation in the rules unintentionally is inhibiting
    US amateurs from employing the latest improvements to some of the
    digital modes," ARRL said in its remarks. "Data signals commonly used
    for daily communications as well as in disaster situations have
    bandwidths in the range of 2.5 kHz and must co-exist with other modes
    that use bandwidths as narrow as 50 Hz."

    ARRL said the 1980s-era symbol rate limits today inhibit the use of
    some efficient data modes. Repealing the symbol rate limit, ARRL
    contended, would "allow shortened transmission times for the same
    amount of data without increasing the bandwidth occupied by the signal.
    Other Amateurs would benefit by the resulting reduction in potential
    interference."

    Other Issues

    ARRL's remarks also addressed issues raised by other parties.
    "Discussion by commenters in this proceeding delve into subjects well
    beyond its scope," ARRL said, noting that it had attempted to broker
    consensus among "some of the most active commenters" with an eye toward
    exploring possible areas of agreement for the FCC's consideration. ARRL
    noted that the parties to the ARRL-arranged talks declined to forward
    to the FCC "joint recommendations on which conditional agreement had
    been reached."

    One of those issues involves Automatically Controlled Digital Stations
    (ACDS). Commenters' concerns focused on interference that could occur
    with a move away from symbol-rate criteria. ACDS with signals wider
    than 500 Hz below 29.7 MHz are confined to specific subbands. ARRL
    recommended that the FCC consider rules changes that would have all
    ACDS stations and digital stations with bandwidths greater than 500 Hz
    share identified subbands.

    ARRL said if additional signals are added to the ACDS subbands, as
    recommended, that it would strongly support expanding the HF ACDS
    subbands. But, the League added, "changing the subband boundaries
    requires study and careful consideration of trade-offs, because any
    changes will affect multiple user interests." ARRL referred subband
    reformulation issues to its HF Band Planning Committee for study and
    recommendations.

    Some commenters also raised the issue of obscure and encrypted
    messages. ARRL pointed out in its ex parte remarks that it remains
    opposed to encryption in the amateur bands, but disagreed "with
    commenters who argue that the digital modes being used by radio
    amateurs around the world are per se 'obscured' or 'encrypted.'" Read
    more.
    Hoc Legislative vocacy Committee to Meet with Lawmakers

    ARRL's Hoc Legislative visory Committee will meet with several
    members of Congress later this month in Washington to introduce new
    Committee members, reacquaint the lawmakers with Amateur Radio's
    most-pressing issues, seek their input on the best ways to achieve
    ARRL's objectives in Congress, and request their continuing support.
    Committee members have completed a comprehensive analysis of Amateur
    Radio Parity Act deficiencies for dissemination to Amateur Radio's
    backers on The Hill. The panel now is following up on this process with
    the meetings later this month.

    The Committee has contracted with The Keelen Group to provide advice
    and recommendations regarding ARRL's legislative relationships. Keelen
    Group advisors also will aid in organizing and guiding the meetings
    between ARRL representatives and key congressional allies in support of
    Amateur Radio initiatives.

    On June 12, the Legislative visory Committee held the first of a
    series of meetings in DC with ARRL Washington Counsel David Siddall,
    K3ZJ, The Keelen Group, and a small contingent of radio amateurs
    associated with various governmental and nongovernmental partners to
    solicit their perspectives and assistance in charting a future course
    of action. Pacific Division Director and Committee Chair Jim Tiemstra,
    K6JAT, described these individuals a "critical allies in ARRL's efforts
    to achieve its legislative objectives."

    The process of analyzing and clarifying ARRL's aims began when the
    Committee was reconstituted with new members at the ARRL Board of
    Directors' January meeting. The Board had determined a need to "review,
    reexamine, and reappraise the ARRL's regulatory and legislative policy
    with regard to private land-use restrictions," with the aim of
    renewing, continuing, and strengthening ARRL's effort to achieve relief
    from such restrictions.

    "There seems to be no countervailing policy that could justify
    arbitrary conditions, covenants and restrictions," Tiemstra said.
    "Indeed, public policy should clearly favor the needs of the Amateur
    Radio operator."

    Amateur Radio's role in public service and emergency communication will
    be the Committee's strongest argument in seeking relief from private
    land-use restrictions that limit amateurs' ability to operate
    effectively.

    The Committee will analyze the outcomes of this month's meetings and
    draft a report with recommendations for the ARRL Executive Committee to
    review and consider at its October 12 meeting. The full Board is
    expected to take up the issue at its January 2020 meeting.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------


    A Radio on Your Belt -- 1930s Style

    Since the advent of wireless technology, efforts have aimed at
    condensing the size of the necessary equipment to permit ease of
    transport, mobile installation, and radios that could be hand carried,
    slipped into a pocket or -- in this case -- carried on the belt. Hugo
    Gernsback's Radio-Craft for December 1936 included the article, "How to
    Make the World's Smallest 3-Tube Radio Set" by Arthur Miller (likely
    not the playwright). It details how a clever radio crafter could
    construct a set worn on a belt around the waist and -- in this case --
    with the antenna worn on the head in the manner of an old-time banker's
    eyeshade. The individual wearing such equipment today likely would not
    only have to endure considerable pointing and laughing but would raise
    the alert level at any airport TSA checkpoint.

    Vacuum tubes of the day were not too sensitive, required separate
    voltage sources for filament and plate, and were pretty hard on
    batteries. The filaments for the three tubes came from "a liquid
    unspillable storage cell" (i.e., rechargeable) to supply the necessary
    2 V. The article says this battery should last from 7 to 10 hours and
    came "with an oiled silk bag and fits in the hip pocket." This was the
    sort of futuristic innovation that Gernsback typically featured in his
    publications, and the entire December 1936 issue of Radio-Craft is
    worth perusing.

    "When using this 'Belt-Radio' the wearer is quite unmindful that the
    latest news or dance music is coming from an ultra-midget receiver
    which is actually being worn on the belt!" the article exults. "And it
    takes only a minute to put the whole equipment on -- and less to take
    it off!"

    According to Miller's article, building the three-tube set was easy.
    "The loop aerial is wound on a cardboard disc 13 ins. in dia," it
    explains. "Litz wire is used and 22 turns are interlaced around the 9
    ribs." No mention of gauging hat size.

    The article concedes just to "one disadvantage" in having to wear the
    antenna on one's head. "The 4-ft. cable connecting it with the receiver
    acts as a capacity and restricts the tuning range of the set," it
    explains.

    The set tuned the AM broadcast band, and with the antenna on the head,
    directionality was less of an issue. While it might look silly to us
    now, project ideas such as this helped advance the radio art toward the
    technology we use and enjoy today.
    So Now What? Podcast

    "Demystifying the Language of Morse Code" is the focus of the new
    (September 19) episode of the So Now What? podcast for Amateur Radio
    newcomers.

    If you're a newly licensed Amateur Radio operator, chances are you have
    lots of questions. This biweekly podcast has answers! So Now What?
    offers insights from those who've been just where you are now. New
    episodes will be posted every other Thursday, alternating new-episode
    weeks with the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast.

    So Now What? is sponsored by LDG Electronics, a family owned and
    operated business with laboratories in southern Maryland that offers a
    wide array of antenna tuners and other Amateur Radio products.

    ARRL Communications Content Producer Michelle Patnode, W3MVP, and ARRL
    Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, co-host the podcast. Presented as a
    lively conversation, with Patnode representing newer hams and Carcia
    the veteran operators, the podcast will explore questions that newer
    hams may have and the issues that keep participants from staying active
    in the hobby. Some episodes will feature guests to answer questions on
    specific topic areas.

    Listeners can find So Now What? on Apple iTunes, Blubrry, Stitcher
    (free registration required, or browse the site as a guest) and through
    the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. Episodes
    will be archived on the ARRL website.

    Amateur Radio Digital Communications Announces Grant to ARISS

    Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC) has announced what's being
    called "a very generous grant" to Amateur Radio on the International
    Space Station (ARISS) to help fund its next-generation Interoperable
    Radio System (IORS) and associated infrastructure improvements and
    enhancements. ARISS said the IORS will replace the aging amateur
    stations on the ISS to ensure the continuation of its primary program
    that lets students speak to ISS crew members via Amateur Radio. ARDC
    said it believes ARISS helps to engage students with Amateur Radio and
    science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in general "by
    providing exciting capabilities that don't exist" on cell phones or the
    internet. A dollar figure was not made public.

    "This was fantastic news!" said ARISS International Chair Frank Bauer,
    KA3HDO, who expressed appreciation for ARDC's generosity. Bauer said
    the ARDC gift would go a long way toward covering the considerable cost
    of making the IORS a reality.

    ARISS said its next-generation IORS will "enable new, exciting
    capabilities for hams, students, and the general public." It also plans
    additional enhancements, which would include:
    * New Amateur Radio communication and experimentation capabilities,
    including an enhanced voice repeater and updated digital packet
    radio
    * APRS capability
    * Two-way slow-scan television (SSTV) in both the US and Russian ISS
    segments
    * HamTV-2
    * A new multi-voltage power supply that will support present and
    future Amateur Radio capabilities and enable wireless
    experimentation

    The ARISS International team has already begun planning for an Amateur
    Radio role for NASA's Lunar Gateway initiative. Some ARDC board members
    have expressed an interest in ARISS's future plans involving the Lunar
    Gateway program, ARISS said.

    The donation to ARISS is the first since ARDC announced its grant
    program earlier this summer. ARISS invites contributions via its
    website. Read more.
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: No sunspots again this week, and as
    of Wednesday, we've seen 15 spotless days in a row. This is the solar
    minimum. The current Cycle 24 is expected to end by year's end.

    The average daily solar flux dipped from 69.4 to 68.1, while average
    daily planetary A index declined slightly from 8.9 to 8.3, while the
    average daily mid-latitude A index rose from 7.7 to 8.

    Predicted solar flux is 68 on September 19 - 26; 69 on September 27 -
    October 6; 70 on October 7; 68 on October 8 - 19, and 69 on October 20
    - November 2.

    Predicted planetary A index is 5 on September 19 - 21; 8 on September
    22 - 23; 5 on September 24 - 26; 35, 45, 20, and 10 on September 27 -
    30; 8, 10, and 8 on October 1 - 3; 5, 5, and 12 on October 4 - 6; 5 on
    October 7 - 9; 8, 5, and 8 on October 10 - 12; 5, 8, and 10 on October
    13 - 15; 5 on October 16 - 19; 8, 5, and 5 on October 20 - 22; 8, 25,
    30, and 18 on October 23 - 26; 8, 5, and 8 on October 27 - 29; 5 on
    October 30 - November 1, and 12 on November 2.

    Sunspot numbers for September 12 - 18 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0,
    with a mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 69.4, 68.3, 68.6, 67.7,
    68.7, 67.5, and 66.3, with a mean of 68.1. Estimated planetary A
    indices were 7, 8, 6, 8, 11, 9, and 9, with a mean of 8.3. Middle
    latitude A index was 7, 8, 7, 8, 10, 8, and 8, with a mean of 8.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean," and
    check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * September 20 -- AGB NEMIGA Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * September 21 -- Feld Hell Sprint
    * September 21 -- QRP Afield (CW, phone, digital)
    * September 21 -- AGCW VHF/UHF Contest (CW)
    * September 21 - 22 -- ARRL EME Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * September 21 - 22 -- All Collegiate QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * September 21 - 22 -- ARRL 10 GHz and Up Contest (CW, phone,
    digital)
    * September 21 - 22 -- SARL VHF/UHF Digital Contest
    * September 21 - 22 -- Scandinavian Activity Contest, CW
    * September 21 - 22 -- All Africa International DX Contest (CW,
    phone, digital)
    * September 21 - 22 -- All Iowa QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * September 21 - 22 -- New Jersey QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * September 21 - 22 -- New Hampshire QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * September 21 - 22 -- Washington State Salmon Run (CW, phone,
    digital)
    * September 22 - 25 -- Classic Exchange, Phone
    * September 23 -- 144 MHz Fall Sprint (CW, phone, digital)
    * September 25 -- SKCC Sprint (CW)
    * September 25 -- UKEICC 80-Meter Contest (CW)
    * September 26 -- RSGB 80-Meter Autumn Series, Data

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    Festival of Frequency Measurement Set to Honor WWV Centennial

    HamSCI and the Case Amateur Radio Club of Case Western Reserve
    University (W8EDU) will sponsor a "Festival of Frequency Measurement"
    on the day of WWV's centennial, October 1, from 0000 to 2359 UTC
    (starting on Monday evening, September 30, in the Americas). The event
    invites radio amateurs, shortwave listeners, and others capable of
    making high-quality frequency measurements on HF to participate and
    publish their data to the HamSCI community on the Zenodo open-data
    sharing site.

    "Changes in ionospheric electron density caused by space weather and
    diurnal solar changes are known to cause Doppler shifts on HF ray
    paths," the event announcement says. "HamSCI's first attempt at a
    measurement of these Doppler shifts was during the August 2017 total
    solar eclipse. We plan a careful measurement during the 2024 eclipse."

    Some of the questions the research event is hoping to answer include
    how WWV's 5 MHz propagation path varies over a given calendar day, and
    how various measurement techniques for understanding the path
    variations compare. The objectives are to measure Doppler shifts caused
    by the effect of space weather on the ionosphere, and to use a
    specified measurement protocol available to Amateur Radio operators and
    other citizen-scientists. The experiment will use August 1, 2019 (UTC)
    as a control date.

    "The recordings in this experiment are expected to show formations of
    the D-layer at stations' local sunrise and other daily events of the
    ionosphere," the announcement said. "Space weather varies day to day
    and some features may be prominent. We'll see what we get!"

    Full information is on the Festival of Frequency Measurement website.

    Mount Diablo Amateur Radio Club Assisting in Restoring Fire-Damaged
    Repeaters

    The Mount Diablo Amateur Radio Club (MDARC) Disaster Recovery Program
    for the 2018 Carr and Camp Fires has made a $1,000 grant to the
    California Amateur Radio Linking Association (CARLA) toward the cost of
    rebuilding one of its destroyed sites. The CARLA network of repeaters
    provides coverage across California and western Nevada to provide
    reliable communication during significant local, regional, and
    wide-area incidents.

    "We are extremely pleased and honored to have been the recipient of
    MDARC's generosity through this initiative," said Tom Naso, N6MVT, one
    of the founders of CARLA. "Our loss of CARLA system 25 in the Redding
    area was a huge hit for us. Not only was it a high-level repeater site
    that covered a lot of territory, but it was also a north-south relay
    site that connected our primary Bay Area hub to our Shasta Area hub, so
    it was a big deal on many levels when it went down that fateful day."

    Naso said CARLA, based in the Bay Area, has systems throughout
    California and parts of Nevada. The MDARC grant will make "a
    considerable dent in the outlay of cash in procuring new equipment to
    replace what burned," he said. "We don't have insurance on the
    equipment because of how many sites we have. It just becomes cost
    prohibitive."

    The MDARC Board of Directors has established a fund to assist
    organizations that have suffered ham system losses as a result of the
    Carr and Camp Fires, and it continues to seek additional clubs with
    fire-damaged systems that may require financial aid to rebuild. MDARC
    recognizes that many of these repeater systems are in critical areas
    that otherwise have very little Amateur Radio or cellular coverage and
    are vital in providing important disaster traffic. Contact the club for
    more information. -- Thanks to ARRL East Bay Section Manager Jim
    Siemons, W6LK, and Tom Naso, N6MVT
    Well-Known Yukon Ham J Allen, VY1JA, is Stepping Away from Amateur
    Radio

    Well-known Canadian radio amateur J Allen, VY1JA, of Whitehorse, Yukon
    Territory, has announced that he's retiring from ham radio, citing
    long-term health issues and hearing loss. The familiar VY1JA call sign
    also has been retired. Allen will begin dismantling his station and
    antennas as early as this weekend. His last contact was with KA4UPI on
    September 14. He has uploaded his logs to Logbook of The World (LoTW)
    and sent copies to his QSL managers.

    "After approximately 30 years of operation and over 110,000 contacts,
    the station VY1JA has gone QRT for operator health reasons effective
    2019-09-14," Allen said on his QRZ.com profile. "All gear and antennas
    are for sale."

    For years, VY1JA was an eagerly sought-after multiplier in the ARRL
    November Sweepstakes and other events, as well as a needed zone in DX
    contests. In recent years, as Allen has begun to step away from regular
    on-the-air appearances, his station has been operated remotely as
    VY1AAA by a team of Canadian-licensed operators located in the US.
    Allen said VY1AAA operation would cease on September 22.

    Gerry Hull, W1VE/VE1RM, who has coordinated VY1AAA operations, told
    ARRL that he's been searching over the past 6 months for another
    Northern Territories station that would be willing to host remote
    operation.

    "The VY1AAA team is greatly saddened by this turn of events," Hull
    said. "Hams around the world will surely miss J and the VY1AAA team on
    the bands. J has been an incredible friend and mentor. Now it is time
    for us to help him off the air." Hull said that over the past 4 years,
    the remotely operated station has logged more than 35,000 contacts, and
    QSL requests will continue to be honored. He invited inquiries via
    email.

    Allen thanked Hull for "his tireless efforts to keep YT/NT/VY1 on the
    air throughout the years of his operation and direction of remote
    operations." Read more.
    In Brief...

    Until October 1, WWV and WWVH are broadcasting a US Department of
    Defense message to mark the centennial of WWV and to announce the
    WW0WWV special event. The message will air at 10 minutes past the hour
    from September 28 until October 2 from the WWV transmitter site near
    Fort Collins, Colorado. Kevin Utter, N7GES, a member of the WW0WWV
    Centennial Committee, recorded the audio track for the announcement.
    Utter has been an integral part of the Committee and is a highly
    respected member of the Northern Colorado Amateur Radio community. --
    Thanks to Paul English, WD8DBY

    A CubeSat with an FM-to-Codec-2 transponder has been launched. The
    Taurus-1 (Jinniuzuo-1) CubeSat carrying an Amateur Radio FM-to-Codec-2
    transponder was launched on September 12 from China's Taiyuan Satellite
    Launch Center. The CubeSat was developed by Aerospace System
    Engineering Research Institute of Shanghai for youth education and
    Amateur Radio. The transponder is similar to that used on the
    LilacSat-1 (LO-90) CubeSat and can use the same software, once
    frequencies are changed, receiving FM with 67 Hz CTCSS on 145.820 MHz
    and retransmitting it as Codec-2 9,600 bps BPSK digital voice on
    436.760 MHz. The telemetry downlink is 435.840 MHz. In addition to the
    transponder, the satellite also carries a drag sail. For more
    information on the transponder type, see "Digital Voice on Amateur
    Satellites: Experiences with LilacSat-OSCAR 90," which appeared in the
    January/February edition of The AMSAT Journal. -- Thanks to AMSAT News
    Service

    North Korea is said to be testing digital broadcasting on 80 meters.
    Radio World reports that the People's Democratic Republic of Korea
    (North Korea) has resumed testing digital radio broadcasting on the
    80-meter amateur band after a 2-year absence. North Korea is
    transmitting with the Digital Radio Mondiale (DRM) protocol. The latest
    transmissions on 3.560 MHz began in mid-August. "It appears unclear at
    this time, however, whether the current series of transmissions will
    soon end or be the start of a regular service," Radio World said.
    "According to radio enthusiasts in the region, the signal has been
    clear and very audible." Radio World says Voice of Korea, the North
    Korean international broadcasting service, has conducted DRM trials off
    and on since 2012.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * September 21 - 22 -- New Mexico State Convention, Albuquerque, New
    Mexico
    * September 27 - 28 -- Central Division Convention, Milwaukee,
    Wisconsin
    * September 28 -- Dakota Division Convention, West Fargo, North
    Dakota
    * September 28 -- Washington State Convention, Spokane Valley,
    Washington
    * October 6 -- Iowa State Convention, West Liberty, Iowa
    * October 11 - 12 -- PNWVHFS Conference and Meeting, Issaquah,
    Washington
    * October 11 - 12 -- Florida State Convention, Melbourne, Florida
    * October 13 -- Connecticut State Convention, Meriden, Connecticut
    * October 18 - 19 -- Delta Division Convention, East Ridge, Tennessee
    * October 18 - 20 -- Pacific Division Convention, San Ramon,
    California
    * October 19 -- 21st Wisconsin ARES/RACES Conference, Wisconsin
    Rapids, Wisconsin
    * October 26 -- South Carolina Section Convention, Conway, South
    Carolina
    * November 2 - 3 -- Georgia State Convention, Lawrenceville, Georgia
    * November 16 -- Indiana Section Convention, Fort Wayne, Indiana

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

    .

    .
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    * QEX -- A Forum for Communications Experimenters. Published
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    Free of charge to ARRL members...
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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
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    purposes require written permission.


    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Sep 27 09:05:18 2019
    The ARRL Letter
    September 26, 2019

    * ARRL Thanks Official Observers as Volunteer Monitor Program is Set
    to Debut
    * ARRL Sets Facebook Live Event for Collegiate Amateur Radio Clubs
    * Nine Schools and Organizations Make the Cut for Ham Contacts with
    ISS Crew
    * 1921 Solar Event May Have Been Bigger than Carrington Event
    * The Doctor Will See You Now!
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * WWV Centennial Celebration and Special Event Kick Off this Weekend
    * Amateur Radio CubeSats among 15 Set to Launch on October 21
    * "Storm Area 51" Event Attracts Modest Crowd, Following ARES/RACES
    Deployment
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    ARRL Thanks Official Observers as Volunteer Monitor Program is Set to
    Debut

    As the September 30 date for the closing of the Official Observer (OO)
    program nears, ARRL has expressed deep appreciation to the hundreds of
    volunteers who gave their time as Official Observers to help preserve
    the integrity of the Amateur Radio bands.

    The Official Observer program has served the Amateur Radio community
    and assisted the FCC Enforcement Bureau for more than 85 years. The OO
    program is giving way to the new Volunteer Monitor (VM) program,
    established as part of a formal partnership between ARRL and the FCC.
    ARRL and the FCC signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) earlier
    this year that establishes the Volunteer Monitor program as a successor
    to the Official Observers. The first Volunteer Monitors should be in
    place and ready to begin their duties this fall.

    "Thank you for your dedication and service," ARRL Regulatory
    Information Manager Dan Henderson, N1ND, said. "It was the good work of
    the OOs over many years that laid the foundation for the FCC to
    recommend this new agreement for enforcement." The FCC proposed the
    program following the closures of several FCC regional offices and a
    reduction in field staff.

    Last February, Riley Hollingsworth, K4ZDH, who once handled Amateur
    Radio enforcement for the FCC, was named to oversee the development and
    implementation phases of the Volunteer Monitor program.

    Under the new VM program, volunteers trained and vetted by ARRL will
    monitor the airwaves and gather evidence that could be used to correct
    misconduct as well as to recognize exemplary on-air operation. ARRL
    will refer instances of flagrant violation to the FCC for action, in
    accordance with FCC guidelines, and the FCC will give priority to
    enforcement cases developed by the VM program.

    Official Observers were invited to apply to become Volunteer Monitors,
    and many did. The requirements for being a Volunteer Monitor include:
    * Ability to utilize state-of-the-art receiving equipment and to
    access no-cost remote receive sites; strong writing and
    communication skills
    * An understanding of the importance of thorough documentation
    * Basic word processing and data entry skills
    * The ability to send such information, including recordings, to ARRL
    electronically. Applicants must also be ARRL members, have no
    history of FCC enforcement action, hold a Technician-class or
    higher license, and been licensed for at least 3 years.

    Applicants underwent a training and certification program administered
    by ARRL and were vetted by ARRL through at least one oral interview and
    a preliminary evaluation by ARRL staff. Volunteer Monitors will serve
    3-year terms at the pleasure of ARRL.

    The objectives of the Volunteer Monitoring Program include improving
    and promoting knowledge and compliance of FCC Amateur Radio Service
    rules, extending and preserving the tradition of self-regulation and
    self-administration of the Amateur Radio Service by volunteers, and
    enabling the FCC Enforcement Bureau "to more efficiently and
    effectively utilize its resources in enforcing the Communications Act
    and Commission rules," according to the MOU.
    ARRL Sets Facebook Live Event for Collegiate Amateur Radio Clubs

    ARRL is inviting campus radio clubs to join a Facebook Live Event on
    Wednesday, October 16, at 6:30 PM PDT and MST; 7:30 PM MDT; 8:30 PM
    CDT, or 9:30 PM EDT. The University of Arizona Amateur Radio Club
    (K7UAZ) is hosting the event.

    ARRL staff member Bob Inderbitzen, NQ1R, and students from the radio
    club will discuss topics involving Amateur Radio clubs at colleges and
    universities, including how to recruit student members, popular
    activities for campus radio clubs, and Amateur Radio as a springboard
    for career connections, networking, and practical experience. Your
    ideas and questions are welcome, and student radio club members and
    advisors may participate.

    This event will stream live on the ARRL Collegiate Amateur Radio
    Initiative (CARI) Facebook group, where collegiate radio clubs may
    share information, techniques, and resources. The ARRL Collegiate
    Amateur Radio Initiative is sponsored in part by the W1YSM Snyder
    Family Collegiate Amateur Radio Endowment Fund.

    Nine Schools and Organizations Make the Cut for Ham Contacts with ISS
    Crew

    Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has announced
    that nine schools and organizations have been selected to host Amateur
    Radio contacts with International Space Station crew members during the
    first half of 2020. The selected host organizations must now complete
    an equipment plan that demonstrates their ability to execute the ham
    radio contact. Once a plan is approved, the final selected
    schools/organizations will have contacts scheduled as their
    availability matches up with the opportunities offered by NASA.

    The schools and host organizations are: Celia Hays Elementary School,
    Rockwall, Texas; Golden Gate Middle School, Naples, Florida; J.P.
    McConnell Middle School, Loganville, Georgia; Kittredge Magnet School,
    Atlanta, Georgia; Maple Dale Elementary School, Cincinnati, Ohio;
    Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt, Nashville,
    Tennessee; Oakwood School, Morgan Hill, California; Ramona Lutheran
    School, Ramona, California, and River Ridge High School, New Port
    Richey Florida.

    The primary goal of the ARISS program is to engage young people in
    science, technology, engineering, arts, and math (STEAM) activities and
    raise their awareness of space communication, radio communication,
    space exploration, and related areas of study and career possibilities.
    1921 Solar Event May Have Been Bigger than Carrington Event

    Scientific American reports that, according to new data, the "New York
    Railroad Storm" of 1921 may have surpassed the intensity of the famous
    Carrington Event of 1859. In his paper published in the journal Space
    Weather, Jeffrey Love of the US Geological Survey and his colleagues
    reexamined the intensity of the 1921 event in greater detail than
    previously.

    Although different measures of intensity exist, geomagnetic storms are
    often rated on an index called disturbance storm time (D_st) -- a way
    of gauging global magnetic activity by averaging out values for the
    strength of Earth's magnetic field measured at multiple locations.
    Earth's baseline D_st level is about -20 nanoteslas (nT), with a
    "superstorm" condition occurring when levels fall below -250 nT.
    Studies of the very limited magnetic data from the Carrington Event peg
    its intensity at anywhere from -850 to -1,050 nT. According to Love's
    study, the 1921 storm came in at about -907 nT.

    Peter Ward in his 2017 New York History Blog article "Strange
    Phenomena: The New York Railroad Storm" recounted that theatre-goers in
    New York City "marveled at the spectacle" of an iridescent cloud that
    was brighter than the moon. "On the roof of the Times Building,
    reporters, having discovered the telegraph lines to be curiously
    blocked, gathered to watch the aerial kaleidoscope," he wrote.

    As with the earlier Carrington Event, telegraph operators experienced
    wild fluctuations in the current on their circuits, while wireless
    propagation was enhanced. "The next day, papers reported that the
    Central New England railroad station (also home to the telegraph
    switchboard) had burned to the ground." Railroad officials later blamed
    the fire on the aurora.

    According to Ward's article, the lights were visible in New York,
    California, and Nevada. Especially in rural areas, "the lights were
    said to be brighter, appear closer to the ground, and even move with a
    swishing sound."

    Railroad and telegraph service were restored the following week,
    although one Western Union transatlantic cable showed signs of damage.
    "Delays and damage lead to some referring to it as the New York
    Railroad Storm," Ward wrote.

    A dramatic description of the event on the SolarStorms.org website
    said, "At 7:04 AM on May 15, the entire signal and switching system of
    the New York Central Railroad below 125th Street was put out of
    operation, followed by a fire in the control tower at 57th Street and
    Park Avenue."

    The short article said a telegraph operator reported being driven away
    from his station by flames that enveloped his switchboard and set the
    building on fire. "In Sweden a telephone station was reported to have
    been 'burned out,' and the storm interfered with telephone, telegraph,
    and cable traffic over most of Europe," the article said.

    The Doctor Will See You Now!

    "Keeping Water out of Coaxial Cables" is the topic of the new
    (September 26) episode of the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast.
    Listen...and learn!

    Sponsored by DX Engineering, ARRL The Doctor is In is an informative
    discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet, or
    smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like!

    Every 2 weeks, your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve Ford, WB8IMY, and
    the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, will discuss a broad range of
    technical topics. You can also email your questions to doctor@arrl.org,
    and the Doctor may answer them in a future podcast.

    Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone or
    iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can also
    listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration required,
    or browse the site as a guest) and through the free Stitcher app for
    iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never listened to a podcast
    before, download our beginner's guide.
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: Sorry, still no sunspots.
    Spaceweather.com reported on September 25 that the sun has been
    spotless for more than 3 weeks -- 23 consecutive days -- and with 89%
    spotless days this summer. So far in 2019, 72% of the days have been
    spotless, equal to what it was in the last solar minimum in 2008 and
    2009.

    We transitioned through the fall equinox this week. This is a good time
    for HF propagation, even with low solar activity, whether you are in
    Northern Hemisphere's fall or Southern Hemisphere's spring.

    Over the September 19 - 25 reporting week, the average daily solar flux
    shifted marginally from 68.1 to 67.3, while average daily planetary A
    index reflected quiet geomagnetic conditions, dipping from 8.3 to 5.4.
    The mid-latitude index went from 8 to 4.6.

    Predicted solar flux is 67 on September 26 - October 3, and 68 on
    October 4 - November 9.

    Predicted planetary A index is 8, 28, 45, 24, and 12 on September 26 -
    30; 12 and 8 on October 1 - 2; 5 on October 3 - 5; 12 on October 6; 5
    on October 7 - 9; 8, 5, 8, 10, 8, and 8 on October 10 - 15; 5 on
    October 16 - 19; 12 and 8 on October 20 - 21; 5 on October 22 - 24; 25,
    18, 10, 5, and 8 on October 25 - 29; 5 on October 30 - November 1; 10
    on November 2; 5 on November 3 - 5, and 8, 5, 8, and 10 on November 6 -
    9.

    The planetary A index forecast of 28, 45, and 24 for September 27 - 29
    is due to solar wind spewing from a large coronal hole, the same one
    that gave us planetary A indices of 38 and 45 on August 31 and
    September 1 -- now after making a trip around the sun. Look for it
    again on October 25 - 26.

    Sunspot numbers for September 19 - 25 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0,
    with a mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 67.1, 67.2, 67.7, 68.3,
    66.1, 67.1, and 67.5, with a mean of 67.3. Estimated planetary A
    indices were 4, 3, 7, 4, 3, 13, and 4, with a mean of 5.4. Middle
    latitude A index was 4, 3, 7, 2, 2, 11, and 3, with a mean of 4.6.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * September 28 - 29 -- CQ Worldwide DX Contest, RTTY
    * September 28 - 29 -- Maine QSO Party (CW, phone)
    * September 30 - October 1 -- QCX Challenge (CW)
    * October 1 -- ARS Spartan Sprint (CW)
    * October 1 -- 220 MHz Fall Sprint (CW, phone, digital)
    * October 1 - 7 -- IQRP Quarterly Marathon (CW, phone, digital)
    * October 2 -- UKEICC 80-Meter Contest (phone)
    * October 3 -- German Telegraphy Contest (CW)
    * October 3 -- SARL 80-Meter QSO Party (phone)
    * October 3 -- NRAU 10-Meter Activity Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * October 3 -- SKCC Sprint Europe (CW)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    WWV Centennial Celebration and Special Event Kick Off this Weekend

    The culmination of months of planning will come to a head this weekend
    as the WWV Centennial Celebration and the related WW0WWV Amateur Radio
    special event get under way. WW0WWV will begin operation on Saturday at
    0000 UTC and continue through October 2 at 0000 UTC. The National
    Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Northern Colorado
    Amateur Radio Club (NCARC), and the WWV Amateur Radio Club have teamed
    up to organize 100th anniversary events. WW0WWV will be active around
    the clock on 160 - 6 meters on CW, SSB, and digital modes (FT8
    operation will be Fox and Hound, except on 160 meters). WW0WWV will
    operate from the challenging RF environment at the WWV site near Fort
    Collins, Colorado. Logs will be streamed live to Club Log, and all logs
    will be uploaded to Logbook of The World (LoTW) after the event ends.

    WW0WWV committee member Dave Swartz, W0DAS, said he's been addressing
    last-minute details and putting out "many little fires." Swartz is
    camping out at the WWV site ahead of the special event.

    A c1920 WWV transmitter, built by
    National Bureau of Standards staff
    and coupled with a hand-crank
    record player. [Photo courtesy of
    WWV/NIST]

    WWV is reputed to be among the oldest -- if not the oldest --
    continuously operating radio stations in the world. It started out as
    an experimental station that eventually became a time and frequency
    standard, and WWV often broadcast music in its early years. WWV served
    as a beacon for Amateur Radio pioneers, who may only have had a rough
    idea of where they were transmitting. When they began, early time
    announcements were in CW. Voice announcements did not start until 1950.
    Time announcements used to be every 5 minutes, but WWV switched to
    announcing the time every 60 seconds in 1971.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    W3V East Coast Special Event Will Also Mark WWV Centennial

    An unrelated east coast special event, W3V in Maryland, will also
    celebrate the 100th anniversary of WWV. Originally an
    experimental/demonstration radio station, WWV was licensed to what then
    was called the National Bureau of Standards -- today NIST -- on October
    1, 1919. The transmitter site, initially in the Washington, DC,
    suburbs, moved to the grounds of the Agricultural Research Center
    (BARC) in Beltsville, Maryland, in the 1930s, before relocating to
    Colorado in 1966.

    The WWV Beltsville, Maryland, home
    of WWV from 1943 until 1966. [Photo
    courtesy of WWV/NIST]

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) also was located on the
    BARC campus, and the Goddard Amateur Radio Club (GARC) will host the
    W3V special event September 28 - October 2 at the GARC club station,
    just north of the old WWV site. It will use the former WA3NAN space
    shuttle HF retransmission frequencies -- 3.860, 7.185, 14.295, 21.395,
    and 28.650 MHz -- as well as amateur satellites. For many years, the
    GARC retransmissions used 100-foot wooden antenna poles that it
    inherited from WWV.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    As part of the WWV centennial, HamSCI and the Case Amateur Radio Club
    of Case Western Reserve University (W8EDU) invites all radio amateurs
    and others capable of making highly accurate HF measurements to
    participate in the WWV Centennial Festival of Frequency Measurement.
    The event will take place on WWV's centennial, October 1, from 0000 to
    2359 UTC (starting on Monday evening, September 30, in the Americas).
    Participants are requested to share their data with the HamSCI
    community on the Zenodo data-sharing site.

    Amateur Radio CubeSats among 15 Set to Launch on October 21

    AMSAT reports that an Antares II launch vehicle will carry 15 CubeSats
    into orbit on October 21 from Wallops Island as part of NASA
    Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) Mission 25. Some will
    carry Amateur Radio payloads.
    * TJ REVERB, developed by students at Thomas Jefferson High School in
    Alexandria, Virginia, will carry a 145.825 MHz APRS digipeater.
    * HuskySat, a University of Washington - Seattle project, will be
    boosted into a 500-kilometer (approximately 310-mile) orbit via the
    Cygnus external deployment device. HuskySat will carry a V/U linear
    transponder provided in cooperation with AMSAT.

    [IMG]Other satellites announced for the ELaNa 25 launch include Argus
    (St. Louis University), 437 MHz telemetry; AzTechSat-1 (NASA Ames
    Research Center) 437 MHz telemetry; CySat (Iowa State University) 436
    MHz telemetry; Phoenix (Arizona State University) 437 and 2400 MHz
    telemetry; RadSat-U (Montana State University) 437 MHz telemetry; SPOC
    (University of Georgia) 437 and 2400 MHz telemetry, and SwampSat II
    (University of Florida) 437 and 2400 MHz telemetry. -- Thanks to AMSAT
    News Service
    "Storm Area 51" Event Attracts Modest Crowd, Following ARES/RACES
    Deployment

    The much-heralded "Storm Area 51" event that started out as a joke on
    social media, prompted states of emergency in two Nevada counties

    A "Storm Area 51" publicity poster.
    [Photo courtesy of Alien Research
    Center]

    and spurred an Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES^(R))/Radio Amateur
    Civil Emergency Service (RACES) deployment. As do many storms, this one
    failed to live up to its hype. No one stormed anything, and no
    extraterrestrials were sighted, beyond variously costumed earthlings
    embracing the vibe. The Storm Area 51 weekend of September 20 - 22
    instead morphed into a music festival and other events along a 50-mile
    stretch of highway running through the Nevada desert known as
    Extraterrestrial Highway (Nevada Highway 375).

    At the core of the whole concept was a call urging people to storm the
    mysterious US Air Force Facility known as Area 51 in the Nevada Test
    and Training Range to see if extraterrestrial life forms said to have
    been recovered by the US military following UFO sightings in the 1950s
    were being held there. The military issued stern warnings to stay away,
    and the FAA was reported to have closed the airspace above the area.

    Some 2 million initially indicated they were game for the event, but
    attendance predictions subsequently were tempered considerably.
    Ultimately, an estimated 3,000 to 4,000 visitors heeded the call, and
    only a hundred or so even made it to the main gate. A couple of people
    were arrested.

    The so-called Extraterrestrial
    Highway in Nevada, during quieter
    times. [Photo courtesy of
    TravelNevada.com]

    A major concern was that a horde of visitors to the small towns of
    Rachel and Hiko would come ill prepared for the desert environment and
    overwhelm the few available facilities available. With virtually no
    local infrastructure and faced with the possibility of being overrun by
    visitors, officials in Lincoln and Nye counties declared states of
    emergency. The town of Rachel, in Lincoln County, has just 50
    inhabitants, and virtually all of the land is owned by the federal
    government. The county has just 20 law enforcement officers. No serious
    problems were reported. ARES teams planned to staff and support six
    incident-specific locations along Extraterrestrial Highway.

    Multiple Facebook sites opened to promote the "Alienstock" music
    festival in Rachel, and an Area 51 Basecamp in Hiko. Other UFO-inspired
    events popped up along desolate Extraterrestrial Highway. Law
    enforcement and medical personnel were posted, along with the Nevada
    National Guard. Visitors came from as far away as Australia.
    In Brief...

    [IMG]Orlando HamCation is accepting nominations for its Carole Perry
    Educator of the Year Award through November 1. This award goes to an
    individual who has made an outstanding contribution educating and
    advancing youth in Amateur Radio. The inaugural award in 2018 went to
    its namesake, Carole Perry, WB2MGP, in recognition of her work in
    teaching students about ham radio. Submit nominations via email or on
    the Orlando HamCation website. Nominations also may be mailed to
    Orlando HamCation, PO Box 574962, Orlando, FL 32857. Downloadable
    nomination forms are available. For more information, contact the
    Awards Committee. The 74th Orlando HamCation will take place February 7
    - 9, 2020.

    AMSAT has announced the results of its 2019 Board election. After
    ballots were tallied, Jerry Buxton, N0JY; Drew Glasbrenner, KO4MA;
    Patrick Stoddard, WD9EWK and Michelle Thompson, W5NYV, were elected by
    the AMSAT membership to serve for 2 years. The First Alternate is
    Brennan Price, N4QX. The Second Alternate is Howie Defelice, AB2S. Both
    will serve 1-year terms. Total number of votes cast was 1,052 (892
    electronic plus 160 paper), with the tally as follows: Michelle
    Thompson, W5NYV, 675 votes; Patrick Stoddard, WD9EWK, 585 votes; Jerry
    Buxton, N0JY, 526 votes, and Drew Glasbrenner, KO4MA, 515 votes;
    Brennan Price, N4QX, 480 votes; Howie DeFelice, AB2S, 435 votes; Paul
    Stoetzer, N8HM, 399 votes, and Jeff Johns, WE4B, 366 votes. -- Thanks
    to AMSAT Secretary Clayton Coleman, W5PFG

    Former long-time ARRL Headquarters staffer John Nelson, K0IO, has died.
    Nelson, of Kellogg, Iowa, was an ARRL Life Member. He was 72. Nelson
    previously held W1GNC and W0DRE. Over his 25 years (1970 - 1995) on the
    Headquarters staff, Nelson served as circulation manager, deputy
    publications manager, and planning and financial analysis manager. He
    curated the former ARRL lobby display of vintage radio artifacts. In an
    article published last year about the 80th anniversary of the Newton
    (Iowa) Amateur Radio Association, Nelson told the Newton Daily News
    that he first became interested in ham radio when he was in sixth
    grade. A graduate of the University of South Dakota, Nelson was vice
    president of the Newton Amateur Radio Association, and an active storm
    spotter. "Ham radio was truly his passion," his sister Ellen Pierson,
    said. After retiring, he pursued a second career publishing books
    related to the history of the Rock Island Railroad. "John was always
    there to help, in his relatively soft-spoken way," said ARRL Radiosport
    and Field Services Manager Bart Jahnke, W9JJ, who had worked with
    Nelson.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * September 27 - 28 -- Central Division Convention, Milwaukee,
    Wisconsin
    * September 28 -- Dakota Division Convention, West Fargo, North
    Dakota
    * September 28 -- Washington State Convention, Spokane Valley,
    Washington
    * October 6 -- Iowa State Convention, West Liberty, Iowa
    * October 11 - 12 -- PNWVHFS Conference and Meeting, Issaquah,
    Washington
    * October 11 - 12 -- Florida State Convention, Melbourne, Florida
    * October 13 -- Connecticut State Convention, Meriden, Connecticut
    * October 18 - 19 -- Delta Division Convention, East Ridge, Tennessee
    * October 18 - 20 -- Pacific Division Convention, San Ramon,
    California
    * October 19 -- 21st Wisconsin ARES/RACES Conference, Wisconsin
    Rapids, Wisconsin
    * October 26 -- South Carolina Section Convention, Conway, South
    Carolina
    * November 2 - 3 -- Georgia State Convention, Lawrenceville, Georgia
    * November 16 -- Indiana Section Convention, Fort Wayne, Indiana
    * December 13 - 14 -- West Central Florida Section Convention, Plant
    City, Florida

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
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    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Oct 4 09:05:16 2019
    The ARRL Letter
    October 3, 2019

    * Bidding in ARRL Online Auction Begins on October 17
    * IARU ministrative Council Steps Up Efforts to Combat Radio
    Spectrum Pollution
    * Ten Teams to Compete in Spectrum Collaboration Challenge
    Championship Event
    * So Now What? Podcast
    * The Weather Channel Cites "Old School Tech" Amateur Radio as Storm
    Resource
    * ARISS Invites Proposals to Host Ham Radio Contacts with Space
    Station Crew
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * Belarus Team Dominates 16th IARU High-Speed Telegraphy World
    Championship
    * Radio Club of America (RCA) Announces its 2019 Award Recipients and
    Fellows
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    Bidding in ARRL Online Auction Begins on October 17

    More than 230 items will go on the block as bidding begins on Thursday,
    October 17, at 10 AM EST (1400 UTC) for the 14th Annual ARRL Online
    Auction. The auction will continue through Thursday, October 24,
    closing at 10 PM EST. An auction preview opens on Monday, October 14.

    The 2019 auction includes lab-tested QST "Product Review" gear, vintage
    books, used equipment, and one-of-a-kind items, plus the ARRL Lab team
    has contributed four of its very popular "Mystery Junque Boxes."

    Some premier "Product Review" items up for bid include the Elecraft KPA
    1500 legal-limit HF and 6-meter linear amplifier, the Icom IC-7610 HF
    and 6-meter transceiver, the Palstar LA-1K 160 - 6 meter amplifier, the
    FlexRadio Systems FLEX-6400M HF and 6-meter SDR transceiver, the
    Kenwood TS-890S HF and 6-meter transceiver, and many more.

    The auction will also offer items donated from the popular television
    series Last Man Standing, starring Tim Allen, an actual radio amateur
    who portrays the fictional Mike Baxter, KA0XTT, in the show, which has
    featured ham radio in some episodes.

    Among book offerings in the auction are the sold out 2019 Handbook
    Boxed Set, a special defense edition of The Radio Amateur's Handbook
    from 1942, and a 1949 ARRL Antenna Book.

    Proceeds from the annual Online Auction benefit ARRL education
    programs. These include activities to license new hams, strengthen
    Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES^(R)) training, offer continuing
    technical and operating education, and create instructional materials.

    All bidders must register (your arrl.org user ID and password will not
    work on the auction site). If you have registered for a previous ARRL
    Online Auction, you may use the same login information. If you have
    forgotten your user ID or password, click the "Help" tab for
    instructions on how to retrieve these credentials. Make sure your
    correct address and other information are up to date. The auction site
    only accepts Visa and MasterCard.
    IARU ministrative Council Steps Up Efforts to Combat Radio Spectrum
    Pollution

    The International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) ministrative Council
    (AC) met on September 28 and 29 in Lima, Peru, to conduct a final
    review of IARU preparations for the International Telecommunication
    Union (ITU) World Radiocommunication Conference 2019 (WRC-19). The
    Council's annual meeting took place just ahead of the triennial IARU
    Region 2 (IARU R2) General Assembly. Responsible for IARU policy and
    management, the Council consists of the three IARU international
    officers and two representatives from each of the three IARU regional
    organizations.

    WRC-19's lengthy agenda includes items of direct interest to the
    Amateur Service, including consideration of improvements to the 50 MHz
    amateur allocation in Region 1, protection of existing amateur
    allocations, and development of the agenda for the next WRC in 2023.
    IARU volunteers and member-societies have been working for the past 4
    years -- since WRC-15 -- to influence proposals from national
    telecommunications administrations and regional telecommunications
    organizations (RTOs) that will be considered at WRC-19, which gets
    under way late this month in Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt.

    "IARU efforts have reduced the number of potentially damaging proposals
    that otherwise might have been offered for consideration, but several
    challenges remain," IARU said in a news release. "A small team of IARU
    observers will attend WRC-19 and will work with amateurs and friends on
    national delegations to reach the best possible outcomes."

    Front: Reinaldo Leandro, YV5AM; IARU
    Vice President Ole Garpestad, LA2RR;
    Don Beattie, G3BJ; Ken Yamamoto,
    JA1CJP; Wisnu Widjaja, YB0AZ. Rear:
    Hans Blondeel Timmerman, PB2T; IARU
    President Tim Ellam, VE6SH/G4HUA;
    David Sumner, K1ZZ; Ram¢n Santoyo,
    XE1KK, and George Gorsline, VE3YV.

    Looking beyond WRC-19, the AC plans to increase its commitment to
    influencing the work of standards organizations, particularly the
    International Special Committee on Radio Interference (CISPR) and its
    participating national committees. IARU cited "the rising level of
    radio spectrum pollution caused by unnecessary and unwanted emissions
    from electronic devices, such as wireless power transfer for the
    recharging of electric vehicles (WPT-EV), is a serious threat to
    radiocommunication services including the Amateur Service."

    Council participants engaged in an extensive discussion to identify the
    principal challenges facing Amateur Radio and how the IARU and its
    member-societies might better address them. Upgrading of the current
    websites of the IARU and its three regional organizations is under way
    and should be completed in the coming months. The AC also adopted a
    Brand Guide to ensure a common identity across the IARU organization.

    The Council's next in-person meeting will take place in October 2020,
    just prior to the IARU Region 1 Conference in Novi Sad, Serbia. Virtual
    AC meetings are also planned beginning in December 2019 and January
    2020. Read more. -- Thanks to IARU Secretary David Sumner, K1ZZ

    Ten Teams to Compete in Spectrum Collaboration Challenge Championship
    Event

    Ten teams of academic, industry, and entrepreneurial technologists are
    set to compete in the Spectrum Collaboration Challenge (SC2)
    championship on October 23 at the Mobile World Congress in Los Angeles.
    The Defense vanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) -- a US
    Department of Defense agency -- announced the qualifiers in September.
    SC2 is a 3-year contest to unlock the potential of the RF spectrum
    using artificial intelligence (AI). The teams' radio designs will go
    head to head during a live competition, and the first-, second-, and
    third-place winners will walk away with $2 million, $1 million, and
    $750,000 in prizes, respectively.

    "These teams have fought long and hard for their chance to compete in
    SC2's Championship Event," SC2 Program Manager Paul Tilghman said in a
    news release. "After 3 years of competition, this final roster reflects
    some of the best minds working at the intersection of AI and wireless
    communications."

    Teams representing Drexel University; the University of Florida;
    Northeastern University; Vanderbilt University; a group from Ghent
    University, the University of Antwerp, and Rutgers University will
    compete in this month's event, along with teams of independent
    researchers.

    "Since its beginning in 2016, SC2 has challenged teams to merge recent
    advances in AI and machine learning with the expanding capacities of
    software defined radios (SDR) to create radio networks capable of
    autonomously collaborating on ways to best utilize the spectrum
    moment-to-moment," the news release said. "Some teams employ
    rule-based, or 'first wave' AI approaches that attempt to capture all
    possible moves or scenarios a radio could face and then define a
    corresponding response. Others are using more advanced AI and machine
    learning, or 'second wave' approaches that exploit pattern recognition
    to help their radios avoid interfering with their wireless neighbors
    while skillfully navigating to open spectrum. A few teams use a
    combination of the two approaches."

    The aim of SC2 is to determine if AI-enabled radios can autonomously
    navigate the wireless spectrum, eliminating the need for rigid,
    human-managed spectrum bands or traditional spectrum allocation.

    "The novel approaches developed by our competitors could enable us to
    make more efficient use of the spectrum we currently have available,
    and possibly forestall spectrum scarcity that threatens future
    performance as more and more devices come online," Tilghman said.

    DARPA says that SC2 began with more than 30 teams that either submitted
    a proposal or successfully completing technical hurdles developed by
    SC2 organizers. A championship play-in round was held in early
    September to determine the final 10 teams that would compete in the
    Championship Event.

    Grant Imahara, known for his work on the Discovery series MythBusters
    and Netflix series White Rabbit Project, will serve as the master of
    ceremonies. He will provide commentary with DARPA's Tilghman and GNU
    Radio Foundation President Ben Hilburn, KJ4DDR. The finale is free to
    attend and open to all MWC 2019 Los Angeles attendees as well as the
    general public. Those without a 3-day pass may email to request a free
    1-day pass to the SC2 Championship Event.
    So Now What? Podcast

    "You're not 'Just' a Tech" -- featuring Andy Milluzzi, KK4LWR -- will
    be the focus of the new (October 3) episode of the So Now What? podcast
    for Amateur Radio newcomers.

    If you're a newly licensed Amateur Radio operator, chances are you have
    lots of questions. This biweekly podcast has answers! So Now What?
    offers insights from those who've been just where you are now. New
    episodes will be posted every other Thursday, alternating new-episode
    weeks with the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast.

    So Now What? is sponsored by LDG Electronics, a family owned and
    operated business with laboratories in southern Maryland that offers a
    wide array of antenna tuners and other Amateur Radio products.

    ARRL Communications Content Producer Michelle Patnode, W3MVP, and ARRL
    Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, co-host the podcast. Presented as a
    lively conversation, with Patnode representing newer hams and Carcia
    the veteran operators, the podcast will explore questions that newer
    hams may have and the issues that keep participants from staying active
    in the hobby. Some episodes will feature guests to answer questions on
    specific topic areas.

    Listeners can find So Now What? on Apple iTunes, Blubrry, Stitcher
    (free registration required, or browse the site as a guest) and through
    the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. Episodes
    will be archived on the ARRL website.

    The Weather Channel Cites "Old School Tech" Amateur Radio as Storm
    Resource

    Julio Ripoll, WD4R, Amateur Radio Assistant Coordinator of WX4NHC at
    the National Hurricane Center (NHC) explained Amateur Radio's role
    during severe weather situations to interviewers from The Weather
    Channel (TWC). In a September 16 segment headlined, "Using Old School
    Tech During a Storm," Ripoll -- seated at WX4NHC -- told Weather
    Channel interviewers Rick Knabb and Mike Bettes, that information NHC
    forecasters receive via Amateur Radio volunteers and spotters
    "sometimes fills in gaps they can't get from satellites or
    reconnaissance."

    Knabb recounted an occasion when he was trying to pin down information
    about a storm system in Central America. "The only way I was able to
    accurately document what happened with that system in Central America
    was because of data through the ham radio operators that relayed it,"
    he told Ripoll.

    Ripoll cited the WX4NHC volunteer staff of approximately 30 radio
    amateurs who gather and essentially screen information gathered via
    Amateur Radio for weather data that may be of use to forecasters.

    Over the weekend, Ripoll expressed appreciation to WX4NHC, Hurricane
    Watch Net, and VoIP Hurricane Net volunteers for the time they donate
    during hurricanes and the reports they send to WX4NHC.

    "Sometimes, we sit for hours listening to static. Sometimes, we receive
    many reports that are unremarkable. Sometimes, we receive very few
    reports. But then there are those times that one or two reports make a
    difference," Ripoll said. He noted that NHC Hurricane Specialist Stacy
    Stewart cited Amateur Radio in a Hurricane Humberto advisory.

    The advisory noted, "An Amateur Radio operator at Ports Island near the
    southern end of Bermuda reported a sustained wind of 75 MPH and a gust
    to 104 MPH during the past hour. An Amateur Radio operator in Somerset
    Village recently reported a sustained wind of 70 MPH and a gust to 89
    MPH." -- Thanks to Julio Ripoll, WD4R
    ARISS Invites Proposals to Host Ham Radio Contacts with Space Station
    Crew

    The Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) Program is
    seeking formal and informal education institutions and organizations --
    individually or working together -- to host an Amateur Radio contact
    with a member of the International Space Station crew. The deadline to
    submit a proposal is November 30. Proposal information and documents
    are on the ARISS website.

    ARISS anticipates that contacts would take place between July 1 and
    December 31, 2020. Crew scheduling and ISS orbits will determine
    specific contact dates. To make the most of these radio contact
    opportunities, ARISS is looking for organizations that will draw large
    numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed
    education plan.

    Crew members aboard the International Space Station routinely conduct
    scheduled Amateur Radio contacts throughout the year. These contacts
    are approximately 10 minutes long and allow students to interact with
    the astronauts through a question-and-answer session.

    Amateur Radio organizations around the world -- with the support of
    NASA and space agencies in Russia, Canada, Japan, and Europe -- make
    these contact opportunities available to educational organizations. An
    ARISS contact is a voice-only communication opportunity via Amateur
    Radio between astronauts and cosmonauts aboard the space station and
    classrooms to educate students about what it is like to live and work
    in space and to learn about space research conducted on the ISS.
    Students will also have an opportunity to learn about satellite
    communication, wireless technology, and radio science.

    Amateur Radio organization volunteers provide the equipment and
    operational support to enable communication between crew on the ISS and
    students around the world using Amateur Radio.

    Because of the nature of human spaceflight and the complexity of
    scheduling activities aboard the ISS, organizations must demonstrate
    flexibility to accommodate changes in contact dates and times.

    Proposal information and more details, including expectations, proposal
    guidelines, proposal forms, and dates and times of informational
    webinars, are on the ARISS website.

    Please direct any questions to ariss.us.education@gmail.com.

    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: A new sunspot from old Cycle 24
    appeared on Tuesday and Wednesday of this week, with the sunspot number
    at 11 on both days. Average daily solar flux rose only slightly from
    67.3 to 67.6. Geomagnetic indices were higher. Average planetary A
    index rose from 5.4 to 14.4, and average mid-latitude A index increased
    from 4.6 to 11.

    Predicted solar flux is 68 for the next 45 days, October 3 - 16.
    Predicted planetary A index is 12 and 8 on October 3 - 4; 5 on October
    5 - 9; 8, 5, 8, and 12 on October 10 - 13; 8 on October 14 - 15; 5 on
    October 16 - 20; 12, 5, and 5 on October 21 - 23; 18, 25, 12, and 10 on
    October 24 - 27; 8, 8, and 12 on October 28 - 30; 8, 8, and 12 on
    October 31 - November 2; 5 on November 3 - 5; 8, 5, 8, 10, 8, and 8 on
    November 6 - 11, and 5 on November 12 - 16.

    Sunspot numbers for September 26 - October 2 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 11,
    and 11, with a mean of 3.1. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 67.1, 66.4,
    67.3, 67.4, 67.9, 68.7, and 68.3, with a mean of 67.6. Estimated
    planetary A indices were 4, 21, 27, 13, 15, 13, and 8, with a mean of
    14.4. Middle latitude A index was 2, 15, 21, 10, 11, 11, and 7, with a
    mean of 11.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * October 5 -- FISTS Fall Slow Speed Sprint (CW)
    * October 5 - 6 -- California QSO Party (CW, phone)
    * October 5 - 6 -- TRC DX Contest (CW, phone)
    * October 5 - 6 -- Oceania DX Contest, Phone
    * October 5 - 6 -- Russian World Wide Digital Contest
    * October 5 - 6 -- International Hell Contest (Digital)
    * October 5 - 6 -- SKCC QSO Party (CW)
    * October 5 - 7 -- YLRL DX/NA YL Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * October 6 -- RSGB DX Contest (CW, phone)
    * October 6 -- UBA ON Contest, SSB
    * October 6 -- Peanut Power QRP Sprint (CW, phone)
    * October 9 -- 432 MHz Fall Sprint (CW, phone)
    * October 10 -- 10-10 International 10-10 Day Sprint (CW, phone,
    digital)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.

    Belarus Team Dominates 16th IARU High-Speed Telegraphy World
    Championship

    The team from Belarus dominated the 16th High-Speed Telegraphy (HST)
    World Championship in mid-September, sponsored by the International
    Amateur Radio Union (IARU). Belarus came away with

    Stanislau
    Haurylenka,
    EW8GS.

    more than two-thirds of the medals, with several other countries' teams
    sharing the rest. Representatives of 19 countries participated in the
    championship, which took place in Albena, Bulgaria, sponsored by the
    Bulgarian Federation of Radio Amateurs.

    Belarus team member Stanislau Haurylenka, EW8GS, ran up a score of
    291,597 points, to top the old world record of 288,671 in the male
    RufzXP category. The top speed achieved during the attempt was 943
    characters/minute or 195 WPM. Teodora Karastoyanova, LZ2CWW, set a new
    female record in the same event, with 293,877 points and a maximum
    speed of 943 characters/minute or 195 WPM. Last May, she set an
    official female record in the Romanian Championships with 286,944
    points.

    Teodora
    Karastoyanova,
    LZ2CWW.

    In all, 60 male and 30 female competitors took part in the events,
    which included reception of five letter/figure/mixed groups for a
    period of 1 minute according to the software provided, transmission of
    five letter/figure/mixed groups for a period of 1 minute, and "radio
    amateur practicing tests," using RufzXP software for call sign
    receiving, and Morse Runner software for pileup receiving.

    The HST competition also includes entry categories for "young" males
    and females (age 16 and younger) and "junior" males and females (up to
    age 21). Official results as well as the world record list are
    available online.

    The 17th IARU HST World Championship will take place in 2020 in
    Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. -- Thanks to IARU Region 1
    Radio Club of America (RCA) Announces its 2019 Award Recipients and
    Fellows

    The Radio Club of America (RCA) has announced its 2019 award recipients
    and fellows. Many of those being recognized are radio amateurs.
    Honorees will be feted at RCA's 110th Banquet & Awards Presentation on
    Saturday, November 23, in New York City.

    Awards

    Armstrong Medal: Thomas Marzetta, for outstanding achievements and
    lasting contributions to the radio arts and sciences and wireless
    communications.

    Fred M. Link Award: George R. Stoll, WA0KBT, for notable achievements
    in land mobile radio communications.

    RCA Special Recognition Award: PMC Associates, in recognition of
    dedicated service to the Radio Club of America.

    Radio Club of America Service Award: David Bart, KB9YPD, in recognition
    of dedicated service to the Radio Club of America.

    US Navy Captain George P. McGinnis Memorial Award: CTM2 Michael Lee
    Heenan, USN (posthumously), in recognition of service and dedication to
    the advancement and preservation of US Navy Cryptology.

    The Vivian A. Carr Award: Margaret Lyons, in recognition of an
    outstanding woman's achievements in the wireless industry.

    Jay Kitchen Leadership Award: Jay Kitchen (posthumously), in
    recognition of achievement of a high level of success leading a
    wireless association.

    Lee de Forest Award: Frederick M. Baumgartner, K0FMB, for significant
    contributions to the advancement of radio communications.

    Barry Goldwater Amateur Radio Award: Martin F. Jue, K5FLU, for unique
    contributions to the field of Amateur Radio.

    Lifetime Achievement: Henry Richter, W6VZA, for significant
    achievements and a major body of work that has advanced the art and
    science of wireless technology.

    Frank A. Gunther Award: Robert Strickland, for dedication to the field
    of military communications.

    Alfred H. Grebe Award: Bob Heil, K9EID, for significant achievements
    and demonstrated excellence in the engineering and manufacturing of
    radio equipment.

    RCA President's Award: Chester "Barney" Scholl, Jr., K3LA, for service
    and dedication to the Radio Club of America.

    DeMello Award: Chief Barry Luke, for demonstrating the highest level of
    personal and professional conduct and performance in Public Safety
    Communications.

    2019 RCA Fellows

    Elevation to Fellow is made by nomination of members in good standing
    for at least the previous 5 years, in recognition of contributions to
    the art and science of radio communications, broadcast, or the Radio
    Club of America.
    * Louis T. Fiore, W2LTF
    * Dana B. Hanford, Jr., KC7SDD
    * Don Root, K6CDO
    * Alan Spindel, AG4WK
    * Lee A. Ward, K0LW
    * Holly Wayt

    A complete listing of RCA Awards and previous recipients is on the RCA
    website.
    In Brief...

    The International Lighthouse/Lightship Weekend (ILLW) will hold its
    23rd annual operating event in 2020 a week later than usual. The event
    is usually held on the third full weekend in August, but this year,
    that date coincides with the 75th anniversary of the cessation of
    hostilities in the Pacific during World War II. "The organizers of the
    event have decided it would be inappropriate to hold the ILLW event on
    the third full weekend of August next year, as many stations will be
    involved in commemorating the important anniversary of VP day,
    especially those bordering and within the Pacific Rim," said ILLW
    Organizer and Webmaster Kevin Mulcahy, VK2CE. "We trust this temporary
    move to August 22 - 23 will not inconvenience anyone." Mulcahy said
    this year's 22nd annual event "was again very successful," with 426
    stations in 50 countries, plus others who did not register
    participating. "Several new countries and lighthouses were listed this
    year," he reported.

    Australian Regulator Reinstates US Amateur Radio License Reciprocity
    The Wireless Institute of Australia (WIA) reports Australia's
    communications regulator, the Australian Communications and Media
    Authority (ACMA) is reinstating the reciprocal arrangement for US
    Amateur Radio license holders. "The reinstatement follows a period of
    suspension of reciprocity precipitated by a complainant objecting to
    the granting of [Australian] licenses," a WIA statement read. "The WIA
    believes that irrespective of the motivations of the complainant to
    raise their objections, the impact of the suspension was only to
    increase barriers to entry to Amateur Radio in Australia, and was most
    unhelpful." The WIA expressed its pleasure that the restriction was
    lifted. A reciprocal license is valid only for 12 months from the date
    of issue and cannot be renewed or extended unless the holder passes the
    local regulations examination.

    Former ARRL North Texas Section Manager Phil Clements, K5PC, of Ben
    Wheeler, Texas, died on September 23. An ARRL Life Member, he was 79.
    Clements served as ARRL North Texas Section Communications
    Manager/Section Manager from 1979 until 1989. (ARRL changed the
    position title to Section Manager in 1984.) Clements was a pilot for
    Braniff Airways and Airborne Express.

    IARU Region 3 Provides for Satellite Uplinks on 15 Meters International
    Amateur Radio Union Region 3 (Asia, Pacific) has approved a modified
    interim band plan that provides Amateur Satellite uplink frequencies
    between 21.125 - 21.450 MHz. The IARU Region 1 and 2 band plans do not
    provide for Amateur Satellite usage. "In all cases of conflict between
    a band plan and the national regulations of a country, the latter shall
    prevail," the band plan states. "However, it is not recommended to use
    frequencies outside of the band plan for the Amateur Satellite Service,
    and it should be noted that the IARU cannot coordinate Amateur
    Satellite usage of frequencies outside of the band plan." The Region 3
    directors met in Tokyo on September 2 - 3. -- Thanks to AMSAT

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * October 6 -- Iowa State Convention, West Liberty, Iowa
    * October 11 - 12 -- PNWVHFS Conference and Meeting, Issaquah,
    Washington
    * October 11 - 12 -- Florida State Convention, Melbourne, Florida
    * October 13 -- Connecticut State Convention, Meriden, Connecticut
    * October 18 - 19 -- Delta Division Convention, East Ridge, Tennessee
    * October 18 - 20 -- Pacific Division Convention, San Ramon,
    California
    * October 19 -- 21st Wisconsin ARES/RACES Conference, Wisconsin
    Rapids, Wisconsin
    * October 26 -- South Carolina Section Convention, Conway, South
    Carolina
    * November 2 - 3 -- Georgia State Convention, Lawrenceville, Georgia
    * November 16 -- Indiana Section Convention, Fort Wayne, Indiana
    * December 13 - 14 -- West Central Florida Section Convention, Plant
    City, Florida

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

    .

    .
    * Join or Renew Today! ARRL membership includes QST, Amateur Radio's
    most popular and informative journal, delivered to your mailbox
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    Subscribe to...
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    articles by top contesters, letters, hints, statistics, scores, NA
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    * QEX -- A Forum for Communications Experimenters. Published
    bimonthly, features technical articles, construction projects,
    columns, and other items of interest to radio amateurs and
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    Free of charge to ARRL members...
    * Subscribe to the ARES E-Letter (monthly public service and
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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
    and registered guests may subscribe at no cost or unsubscribe by editing
    their profile.

    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
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    purposes require written permission.


    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Oct 11 09:05:16 2019
    The ARRL Letter
    October 10, 2019

    * FCC Proposes Fining New York Radio Amateur $17,000 for Alleged
    Deliberate Interference
    * ARRL Public Relations Committee Invites Nominations for Bill
    Leonard Award
    * US Coast Guard Airs Proposal to End MF Navigational Telex (NAVTEX)
    Broadcasts
    * The Doctor Will See You Now!
    * Hawaii Contest Station and Winlink Leveraged for 2019 Simulated
    Emergency Test
    * Ohio Sheriff Observes and Participates in ARES Simulated Emergency
    Test
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * FCC Dismisses Three Petitions for Rule Making Filed by Radio
    Amateurs
    * Milwaukee Radio Amateurs' Club Celebrates Centennial of ARRL
    Affiliation
    * Anna Brummer, N2FER, Feted on her 105th Birthday
    * Lynyrd Skynyrd Founding Member Larry Junstrom, K4EB, SK
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    FCC Proposes Fining New York Radio Amateur $17,000 for Alleged
    Deliberate Interference

    Harold Guretzky, K6DPZ, of Richmond Hill, New York, is facing a $17,000
    FCC fine for allegedly causing intentional interference on a local
    repeater and preventing other radio amateurs from using it. The FCC
    issued a Notice of Apparent Liability for Forfeiture (NAL) on October
    3.

    "Given his history as a repeat offender, this violation warrants a
    significant penalty," the FCC said in the NAL.

    The NAL recounted numerous complaints alleging that Guretzky was
    deliberately interfering with a repeater in Glen Oaks, New York. In
    June of 2017, the FCC issued a Warning Letter to Guretzky, advising him
    of the nature of the allegations against him and directing him to stop
    using the repeater going forward. Nonetheless, additional complaints
    were filed. In April 2018, agents from the FCC New York Enforcement
    Bureau office drove to Richmond Hill to investigate and to advise him
    in writing that he was prohibited from using the local repeater.

    After the FCC received further complaints, an Enforcement Bureau agent
    monitored the VHF repeater's input and output frequencies and, after
    observing deliberate interference to other stations, used
    direction-finding techniques to identify the source of the transmission
    as Guretzky's station.

    "The agent monitored and recorded the transmissions emanating from
    Guretzky's station for several hours that afternoon and heard him
    interfering with the local repeater," the NAL said. "Later, the agent
    heard Guretzky making threatening comments toward other amateur
    operators." The following month, FCC Regional Director David Dombrowski
    spoke with Guretzky by telephone, noting the continued complaints and
    and cautioning him against using the repeater.

    In the NAL, the FCC said Guretzky demonstrated "a deliberate disregard
    for the Commission's authority and the very spirit of the Amateur Radio
    Service by continuing to interfere with the local repeater" despite
    having been warned. Read more.
    ARRL Public Relations Committee Invites Nominations for Bill Leonard
    Award

    The ARRL Public Relations Committee is seeking ARRL members' assistance
    in recognizing print, radio, and television/multimedia news stories
    that have best showcased Amateur Radio this year. Nominations are open
    for the 2019 Bill Leonard Award, which honors professional journalists
    or journalistic teams whose outstanding coverage highlights the
    enjoyment, importance, and public service value of the Amateur Service.
    The award honors its namesake, the late CBS News President Bill
    Leonard, W2SKE (SK), who was an avid radio amateur and advocate.

    Awards are presented in each of three categories -- print/digital,
    audio, and visual. Nominations are judged by members of the ARRL Public
    Relations Committee, and the ARRL Board of Directors will make the
    final decision on award recipients at its January 2020 meeting. The
    award winner in each category, either an individual or a group, will
    receive an engraved plaque, and a $250 contribution will be made in
    each winning entry's name to the charitable organization of their
    choice.

    To be considered:
    * Nominees must be professional journalists or professional
    journalistic teams in print, electronic media, or multimedia.
    * A nominee's work must have appeared between December 1, 2018 and
    November 29, 2019, in English in a commercially published book,
    recognized general-circulation (non-trade) daily or weekly
    newspaper, general or special interest magazine (except
    publications predominantly about Amateur Radio), commercial or
    public radio or television broadcast (including services delivered
    via cable), a website operated by a generally-recognized
    journalistic organization (e.g., newspaper, magazine, broadcast
    station, or network), or multimedia format intended for and readily
    accessible to the general public within the US.
    * The scope of the work nominated may be a single story or series.
    * Stories must be truthful, clear, and accurate, reflecting high
    journalistic standards.
    * Submission may be by the author of the work or on his or her behalf
    by another individual who believes the work merits the award.

    Entries must be received at ARRL Headquarters, c/o Communications
    Manager, ARRL, 225 Main St., Newington, CT 06111, by 5 PM on November
    29, 2019.

    For more information, contact ARRL Communications Manager David Isgur,
    N1RSN (telephone 860-594-0328). Visit the award web page for award
    rules. Scroll down the page for a link to a downloadable nomination
    form.

    US Coast Guard Airs Proposal to End MF Navigational Telex (NAVTEX)
    Broadcasts

    The US Coast Guard is seeking comments on a proposal that it may stop
    broadcasting medium-frequency (MF) Navigational Telex (NAVTEX). The
    service says it first will ensure that the information contained in
    NAVTEX broadcasts is available via International Maritime
    Organization-recognized satellite services. Interested parties may
    submit comments online by November 12. The proposal is docket
    USCG-2019-0702. Comments should include the docket number, specific
    section of the document to which each comment applies, and a reason for
    each suggestion or recommendation. Comments may be anonymous.

    "Current MF NAVTEX equipment is in dire need of replacement. The
    equipment is antiquated, and essential replacement parts are difficult
    to find and expensive, placing overall operation of MF NATEX at risk,"
    the Coast Guard said. "Any approved GMDSS satellite terminal will be
    able to receive this information."

    NAVTEX is an international automated service for radio delivery of
    navigational and meteorological warnings and forecasts, as well as
    urgent maritime safety information. It provides a low-cost means of
    broadcasting this information to ships out to approximately 100
    nautical miles offshore. NAVTEX is part of the Global Maritime Distress
    and Safety System (GMDSS) which has been incorporated into the Safety
    of Life at Sea (SOLAS) treaty, to which the US is a party. The US Coast
    Guard operates the system nationwide.

    System coverage is reasonably continuous in the east, west, and Gulf
    coasts of the US, as well as the area around Kodiak, Alaska; Guam, and
    Puerto Rico. The US has no coverage in the Great Lakes, although
    coverage of much of the Lakes is provided by the Canadian Coast Guard.
    The US Coast Guard originally only installed NAVTEX at sites where
    Morse code messages had been previously transmitted, and some coverage
    gaps exist.

    "We believe the transition from terrestrial broadcast to satellite will
    provide for more reliable delivery of NAVTEX information and allow
    better, more cost-effective products in the future," the Coast Guard
    said.
    The Doctor Will See You Now!

    "Antenna EnTRAPment! All about Traps" is the topic of the new (October
    10) episode of the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast. Listen...and learn!

    Sponsored by DX Engineering, ARRL The Doctor is In is an informative
    discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet, or
    smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like!

    Every 2 weeks, your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve Ford, WB8IMY, and
    the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, will discuss a broad range of
    technical topics. You can also email your questions to doctor@arrl.org,
    and the Doctor may answer them in a future podcast.

    Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone or
    iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can also
    listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration required,
    or browse the site as a guest) and through the free Stitcher app for
    iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never listened to a podcast
    before, download our beginner's guide.

    Hawaii Contest Station and Winlink Leveraged for 2019 Simulated
    Emergency Test

    ARES volunteers in Hawaii took the opportunity of the 2019 Simulated
    Emergency Test (SET) on October 6 (UTC) to test Winlink radio messaging
    to the US mainland, using the KH6YY (KH6J) contest station on O'ahu.
    One of the premier contest stations in the middle of the Pacific Ocean,
    KH6YY offers a commanding propagation path over an expanse of
    saltwater.

    "You have to start with digital modes somewhere," ARRL Pacific Section
    Manager Joe Speroni, AH0A, said.

    A view from above: The KH6YY (KH6J)
    contest station.

    A group of radio amateurs has developed a robust Winlink system in the
    Hawaiian Islands to help support communication in a natural disaster.
    The Amateur Radio email system is well known for its role in emergency
    and disaster relief communications, providing the ability for users to
    exchange email with attachments, photos, position reporting, weather,
    and information bulletins.

    KH6YY sports eight antennas, most on 90-foot towers, and nine operator
    positions. For the SET, the station was configured to receive traffic
    on 7,100 kHz (dial frequency) in PACTOR, WINMOR, ARDOP, and VARA modes.
    The four-element 40-meter beam was aimed at Hilo. Simulating an
    internet outage, the setup was used to pass received traffic to a
    second 20-meter gateway on 14,100.5 kHz and forwarded to a mainland
    gateway with internet access.

    Incoming message traffic on 40 meters would be automatically forwarded
    to the mainland on 20 meters. Most of the traffic went to gateways in
    Mexico and Texas for forwarding to the internet. One user reported
    receiving email confirmation that a message was received within
    minutes. Read more. -- Thanks to Stacy Holbrook, KH6OWL
    Ohio Sheriff Observes and Participates in ARES Simulated Emergency Test

    One public official in Ohio not only observed the ARES Simulated
    Emergency Test (SET) this month but participated in it with Greene
    County ARES (GCARES). Greene County Sheriff Gene Fischer, KX8GCS
    ("Greene County Sheriff"), checked in when the Resource Net Control,
    Bob Baker, N8ADO, called for volunteers. Although the suggested
    scenario called for only using simplex, GCARES employed the Xenia
    Amateur Radio Weather Net (XWARN) repeater to reach out for as many
    volunteers as possible. Volunteers then switched to a simplex tactical
    net to communicate with the GCARES Command Center.

    Greene County Sheriff Gene
    Fischer, KX8GCS.

    Before the SET, Fischer let Greene County ARES Emergency Coordinator
    Henry Ruminski, W8HJR, know that he planned to participate in the SET
    to determine how well his handheld radio would perform in an emergency
    situation. While he found it okay for getting into the resource net, it
    was less than adequate for effective simplex operation.

    Sheriff Fischer had an intense introduction to ham radio in the spring
    of 2017 when the Dayton Hamvention^(R) moved to Xenia, and his
    department dealt with traffic control and other issues created by the
    influx of more than 25,000 visitors. At the urging of several hams,
    Fischer subsequently got his license, and his wife became relicensed.
    Fischer has since upgraded to General.

    Ruminski said the SET was "relatively successful." Signals could have
    been better from some locations, but most stations were able to
    communicate with command, he said. Lessons learned will be used to
    improve future emergency communication plans.

    The K7RA Solar Update

    No sunspots appeared over the past week, and in the prior week there
    were only two days with sunspots, so the average daily sunspot number
    declined from 3.1 to 0.

    Average daily solar flux nudged higher, but just barely, from 67.6 to
    67.8.

    Geomagnetic indicators were much lower this week, with average daily
    planetary A index retreating from 14.4 to 6.3, while the mid-latitude
    average went from 11 to 5.3.

    Predicted solar flux for the next 45 days is 68. That's correct -- on
    every day for the next month and a half, October 10 through November
    23, the solar flux is forecast to be 68.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * October 12 -- QRP ARCI Fall QSO Party (CW)
    * October 12 -- FISTS Fall Unlimited Sprint (CW)
    * October 12 -- Microwave Fall Sprint (CW, phone)
    * October 12 - 13 -- Makrothen RTTY Contest
    * October 12 - 13 -- Nevada QSO Party (CW, phone)
    * October 12 - 13 -- Oceania DX Contest, CW
    * October 12 - 13 -- Scandinavian Activity Contest, SSB
    * October 12 - 13 -- SKCC Weekend Sprintathon (CW)
    * October 12 - 13 -- Pennsylvania QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * October 12 - 13 -- Arizona QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * October 12 - 13 -- South Dakota QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * October 12 - 13 -- PODXS 070 Club 160-Meter Great Pumpkin Sprint
    (Digital)
    * October 13 -- UBA ON Contest, CW
    * October 13 -- UBA ON Contest, 6 Meters (CW, phone)
    * October 14 -- 4 States QRP Group Second Sunday Sprint (CW, phone)
    * October 14 -- RSGB 80-Meter Autumn Series (CW)
    * October 17 -- AGCW Semi-Automatic Key Evening (CW)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.

    FCC Dismisses Three Petitions for Rule Making Filed by Radio Amateurs

    The FCC has dismissed petitions for rule making filed in 2018 by three
    radio amateurs. All of the petitions were put on public notice earlier
    this year and comments invited.

    Edward C. Borghi, KB2E, of Farmington, New York, and Jeffrey Bail,
    NT1K, of West Springfield, Massachusetts, submitted very similar
    petitions seeking changes in how the FCC grants Amateur Radio vanity
    call sign applications. Borghi's Petition (RM-11834), would have
    prohibited vanity applicants from requesting call signs not designated
    for the applicant's geographical region, with some exceptions. He
    complained that applicants had to compete with "out-of-area people for
    the few 1 * 2 or 2 * 1 or catchy 2 * 3 call signs available in their
    area of residence."

    Bail's Petition (RM-11835) asked the FCC to give residential preference
    in competing applications to applicants whose listed FCC address is
    within the same district/region as the applied call sign. He cited
    limited availability and increased demand for 1 * 2 and 2 * 1 call
    signs. The FCC dismissed both petitions in a single letter.

    "When the Commission established the vanity call sign system in 1995,
    it rejected a proposal to restrict vanity call sign applicants to call
    signs designated for the region in which the applicant resides," the
    FCC wrote, because it would restrict a given applicant's choice of
    vanity call signs to 10% or less of those otherwise assignable.

    The FCC concluded that no need exists to require vanity call signs to
    correspond to a licensee's mailing address, "given that call signs do
    not automatically change when a licensee moves, and a licensee's
    mailing address is not necessarily the location from which he or she is
    transmitting." The FCC said it rejected similar proposals in the past
    for the same reasons.

    The FCC also turned away a Petition (RM-11833) from Jerry Oxendine,
    K4KWH, of Gastonia, North Carolina, who asked the FCC to clarify that
    states and localities should have no authority to regulate Amateur
    Radio with respect to enacting "distracted driving" statutes. Oxendine
    argued that such statutes violate FCC rules on scope and operation of
    equipment by licensees; violate the intent of the FCC and Congress with
    respect to Amateur Radio's role in disasters, and hinder emergency
    operations using mobile equipment.

    In denying the request, the FCC took issue with Oxendine's assertion
    that the strong federal interest in promoting Amateur Radio
    communication should preempt distracted driving laws.

    "Laws that prohibit talking on handheld communications devices while
    driving do not preclude or unreasonably obstruct mobile use of handheld
    two-way radios," the FCC said in denying Oxendine's petition. "These
    laws apply to the use of handheld devices while driving. A driver can
    comply with these laws by using a hands-free attachment or by parking
    the vehicle prior to using a handheld device, both of which are
    contemplated by our rules regarding two-way radios."

    The FCC said, "The record before us does not demonstrate that state and
    local laws that prohibit talking on handheld devices while driving
    stand as an obstacle to amateur communications or actually conflict
    with federal law in any way." Read more.
    Milwaukee Radio Amateurs' Club Celebrates Centennial of ARRL
    Affiliation

    Members of the Milwaukee Radio Amateurs' Club (MRAC) on September 28
    celebrated the radio club's 100th anniversary of ARRL affiliation
    during the 2019 ARRL Central Division Convention, held September 27 -
    28. The convention, held during the HRO Superfest, was hosted by Ham
    Radio Outlet at its Milwaukee location.

    MRAC was formed in January 1917. In 1919, after World War I, ARRL
    introduced the concept of having local radio clubs officially affiliate
    with ARRL to formalize a network for relaying message traffic from
    coast to coast. MRAC was granted ARRL affiliation on December 5, 1919,
    as one of a group of 10 clubs. In 1970, MRAC was recognized as the only
    one of that first group of clubs that was still active, making it the
    oldest ARRL-affiliated club.

    ARRL CEO Howard Michel, WB2ITX
    (left), presented a plaque to MRAC
    Club President David Schank, KA9WXN,
    on behalf of the ARRL Central
    Division.

    MRAC sponsored the first-ever ARRL Central Division Convention in 1928,
    and it organized an ARRL National Convention in 1948. The club produced
    a video in 2017 that recounts its rich history.

    MRAC today has a full calendar of annual activities that include
    regular club meetings featuring speakers and presentations covering a
    variety of topics. The club participates in ARRL Field Day each June,
    conducts regular license exam sessions, and holds an annual swapfest. A
    group of club members are currently developing an Amateur Satellite
    station and related resources, which they plan to use to support a
    local school as part of an educational outreach program. Club members
    are also Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES^(R)) volunteers,
    supporting public service communication for events throughout the
    region and during emergencies.
    Anna Brummer, N2FER, Feted on her 105th Birthday

    When she turned 80, Anna Brummer, N2FER, of Fort Edward, New York,
    predicted she would live to be 100. On September 27, she topped her own
    forecast by 5 years, as she celebrated her birthday at the Fort Hudson
    Nursing Center, surrounded by family and friends. The only thing she
    wanted was a drink of Scotch whiskey, and the nursing home obliged,
    along with a slice of cake. Unit Manager Donna Hopkins told Post Star
    newspaper reporter Gretta Hochsprung that she didn't attempt to put 105
    candles on Brummer's cake because it would have been a fire hazard.
    Brummer told Hochsprung that the secret to longevity is being nice to
    people.

    "Keeps you young when everything's going smooth," she told the
    reporter.

    Anna Brummer was a latecomer to Amateur Radio. In 1984, her son
    Richard, K2JQ (ex-K2REB), got his mom and his dad, Edwin, interested in
    Amateur Radio, and Anna obtained her Technician license when she was 69
    years old. Edwin Brummer, who died in 1996, was N2FEQ, and held a Tech
    Plus ticket. They were married for 56 years.

    No official records are kept, but Anna Brummer is among a small circle
    of centenarian radio amateurs in the US and may be the oldest woman
    holding a license. Read more.
    Lynyrd Skynyrd Founding Member Larry Junstrom, K4EB, SK

    Southern Rocker Larry "LJ" Junstrom, K4EB, died on October 6. He was
    reported to be 70. Junstrom was a founding member and bassist of Lynyrd
    Skynyrd, although he left the group before it recorded its first album.
    He's better known as a member of another Southern Rock band, 38
    Special, with which he performed from 1977 until retiring in 2014.

    "The Big Man on the Big Bass has left us," a statement on the 38
    Special website said. "He rocked arenas all over the world and
    succeeded in living his dream. He was truly one of a kind, a congenial
    traveling companion and a great friend to all with a humorous slant on
    life that always kept our spirits high -- a kind man with a big heart
    for everyone who crossed his path."

    Licensed in 1962 as WN2LKF, later becoming WA4LKF, he was a regular
    attendee of Orlando HamCation. Junstrom was inactive in Amateur Radio
    during his busy years on the road but picked up the hobby again in 1990
    and became an avid DXer with 347 entities in mixed DXCC. He was a
    frequent check-in to the Musicians' Net on 40 meters.

    After retiring, Junstrom worked in real estate in north central
    Florida.
    In Brief...

    The ARRL Board of Directors' Executive Committee (EC) will meet on
    October 12 in Denver, Colorado. The meeting agenda includes legal,
    legislative, and organizational matters as well as reports from ARRL
    President Rick Roderick, K5UR; ARRL CEO Howard Michel, WB2ITX, and
    Washington Counsel David Siddall, K3ZJ. The EC will consider an ex
    parte filing on ARRL's petition for rule making (RM-11785) to the FCC
    to create a new, contiguous secondary Amateur Service band at 5 MHz,
    filed in January of 2017. In its petition, ARRL asked the Commission to
    keep four of the current five 60-meter channels -- one would be within
    the new band -- as well as the current operating rules, including the
    100 W PEP effective radiated power (ERP) limit.

    The Tokelau Islands ZK3A DXpedition has ceased operation early. Due to
    the illness of an Island resident, the ZK3A Tokelau Islands DXpedition
    shut down a couple of days ahead of schedule. "ALL TEAM MEMBERS ARE
    FINE!" said an announcement on the ZK3A website. "A person on the
    island is ill. So, they have sent the boat there early to get this
    person medical help. The team has ceased operations and [is] packing up
    all equipment to get on that boat, because there will not be another
    boat for 10 days." As of October 8, ZK3A had logged approximately
    50,000 contacts in 7 days of operation on CW, SSB, RTTY, FT8, and EME,
    as well as 10 contacts on slow-scan TV. The DXpedition had been set to
    conclude on October 11.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * October 11 - 12 -- PNWVHFS Conference and Meeting, Issaquah,
    Washington
    * October 11 - 12 -- Florida State Convention, Melbourne, Florida
    * October 13 -- Connecticut State Convention, Meriden, Connecticut
    * October 18 - 19 -- Delta Division Convention, East Ridge, Tennessee
    * October 18 - 20 -- Pacific Division Convention, San Ramon,
    California
    * October 19 -- 21st Wisconsin ARES/RACES Conference, Wisconsin
    Rapids, Wisconsin
    * October 26 -- South Carolina Section Convention, Conway, South
    Carolina
    * November 2 - 3 -- Georgia State Convention, Lawrenceville, Georgia
    * November 16 -- Indiana Section Convention, Fort Wayne, Indiana
    * December 13 - 14 -- West Central Florida Section Convention, Plant
    City, Florida

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

    .

    .
    * Join or Renew Today! ARRL membership includes QST, Amateur Radio's
    most popular and informative journal, delivered to your mailbox
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    * Listen to ARRL Audio News, available every Friday.

    Subscribe to...
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    * QEX -- A Forum for Communications Experimenters. Published
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    columns, and other items of interest to radio amateurs and
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    Free of charge to ARRL members...
    * Subscribe to the ARES E-Letter (monthly public service and
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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
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    purposes require written permission.


    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Daryl Stout@1:19/33 to SEAN DENNIS on Mon Oct 14 08:04:00 2019
    Sean,

    The ARRL Letter
    October 10, 2019

    * FCC Proposes Fining New York Radio Amateur $17,000 for Alleged
    Deliberate Interference

    I have to wonder at the stupidity of some of these hams who do such
    flagrant violations.

    Daryl, WX4QZ


    * OLX 1.53 * NO CARRIER -- but I've got some warships and F-15's.
    --- SBBSecho 3.10-Win32
    * Origin: The Thunderbolt BBS - tbolt.synchro.net (1:19/33)
  • From Ricky DeLuco@1:135/383 to Daryl Stout on Wed Oct 16 07:41:28 2019

    * FCC Proposes Fining New York Radio Amateur $17,000 for Alleged
    Deliberate Interference

    I have to wonder at the stupidity of some of these hams who do such flagrant violations.

    Daryl, WX4QZ


    I read the full article and also referenced the ARRL section on this. This person was asked, warned, visited and asked again. Then was issues a warning letter. What was next ... "pretty please" ... He is getting exactly what he deserves.

    Ricky, K4JTT

    ---

    Rocket Town BBS - Telnet: rtbbs.ddns.net
    fsxNET: 21:1/203 FidoNET:1:135/383 - Titusville, FL. NASA SPACE Coast

    --- Mystic BBS v1.12 A43 2019/03/03 (Windows/32)
    * Origin: Rocket Town BBS (1:135/383)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Oct 18 09:05:02 2019
    The ARRL Letter
    October 17, 2019

    * ARRL to Launch New On the Air Magazine
    * ARRL Online Auction Bidding is Now Open
    * Report Causes Concern and Confusion in California's Amateur Radio
    Ranks
    * NASA Spacecraft Launches on Mission to Explore Frontier of Space
    * So Now What? Podcast
    * Next School Club Roundup Set for October 21 - 25
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * PACTOR Developer SCS Announces Monitoring Software
    * AMSAT Goal: "Amateur Radio in Every CubeSat"
    * Homebrew Heroes Award for 2019 in Amateur Radio Announced
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions

    ARRL to Launch New On the Air Magazine

    ARRL is launching a new magazine, On the Air, in January 2020. To be
    published on a bimonthly basis, On the Air will offer new and
    beginner-to-intermediate-level radio amateurs a fresh approach to
    exploring radio communication. Each issue will include advice and
    insights on topics from the variety of Amateur Radio interests and
    activities: radio technology, operating, equipment, project building,
    and emergency communication. The goal of this new magazine is to be a
    vital resource in helping new and newer radio amateurs get active and
    involved in radio communications.

    "On the Air responds to the brand-new and not-so-brand-new radio
    amateur seeking ideas and answers," said QST Managing Editor Becky
    Schoenfeld, W1BXY. Schoenfeld is part of the ARRL staff team that
    developed the new magazine. The planning included an extensive
    national-level study of new Amateur Radio licensees, identifying their
    motivations for getting licensed and their experiences of getting
    started. A focus group responded positively to a trial sample edition
    of the magazine.

    "Too many new licensees never take the next step," says Schoenfeld.
    "We're excited to introduce a new Amateur Radio magazine for this
    audience, aimed at getting them active, getting them involved, and
    getting them on the air."

    The first issue of On the Air will be published in January 2020
    (January/February issue) and will be introduced as a new ARRL
    membership benefit. Effective November 1, when eligible US radio
    amateurs join ARRL or renew their memberships, they will be prompted to
    select the print magazine of their choice -- On the Air or QST. Current
    members receiving the print edition of QST, upon renewal, may choose to
    continue receiving the print edition of QST (monthly) or the print
    edition of On the Air (bimonthly).

    All ARRL members, including international members, will be able to
    access digital editions of both QST and On the Air. Members who already
    access QST on the web or from the mobile app will be able to access QST
    and On the Air starting in January.
    ARRL Online Auction Bidding is Now Open

    Bidding began today, October 17, on more than 230 items on the block in
    the 14th annual ARRL Online Auction. Bidding got under way at 10 AM EST
    (1400 UTC), and the auction will continue through Thursday, October 24,
    closing at 10 PM EST (Friday, October 25, at 0200 UTC).

    The 2019 auction includes lab-tested QST "Product Review" gear, vintage
    books, used equipment, and one-of-a-kind items. Some premier "Product
    Review" items up for bid include the Elecraft KPA1500 legal-limit HF
    and 6-meter linear amplifier, the Icom IC-7610 HF and 6-meter
    transceiver, the Palstar LA-1K 160 - 6 meter amplifier, the FlexRadio
    Systems FLEX-6400M HF and 6-meter SDR transceiver, and the Kenwood
    TS-890 HF and 6-meter transceiver.

    Among book offerings in the auction are the "sold out" 2019 Handbook
    Boxed Set, a special defense edition of The Radio Amateur's Handbook
    from 1942, and a 1949 ARRL Antenna Book.

    Proceeds from the annual Online Auction benefit ARRL education
    programs. Bidders must register (your arrl.org user ID and password
    will not work on the auction site). If you have registered for a
    previous ARRL Online Auction, you may use the same login information
    this year.

    Report Causes Concern and Confusion in California's Amateur Radio Ranks

    By all credible and reliable accounts, the State of California has not
    turned its back on Amateur Radio as an emergency communication
    resource, nor have established repeater owners been asked to remove
    their equipment from state-owned sites unless they pay sizable fees.
    The California controversy, inflamed by a viral YouTube video, stemmed
    from a California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE)
    communication telling a repeater owner or group that Amateur Radio
    equipment would have to be removed from a state-owned site or "vault"
    if the owner(s) determined the cost was too great to proceed with a
    formal application to keep it there.

    "I do understand and appreciate all of the service you have provided in
    the past," CAL FIRE's Lorina Pisi, told the unknown repeater owner(s)
    or group(s) last month. "However, with constantly changing
    technological advances, there is no longer the same benefit to State as
    previously provided. Therefore, the Department no longer financially
    supports HAM operators [sic] radios or tenancy. If you desire to enter
    into a formal agreement to operate and maintain said equipment, you
    must complete and submit attached collocation application along with
    fee as outlined on page one of application. There is cost associated
    with getting an agreement in place."

    It's not clear to whom Pisi's memo was addressed, because any name or
    names were redacted from the version of the memo that is being
    circulated. ARRL reached out to Pisi but has not heard back.

    ARRL officials who have also looked into the situation agree that it's
    been blown out of proportion by parties with their own agendas.

    "The State of California has not made any determination we can find
    'that Ham Radio [is] no longer a benefit,'" Pacific Division Director
    Jim Tiemstra, K6JAT, is quoted on the Sacramento Valley Section
    website. "What happened is that CAL FIRE has transferred responsibility
    for its communications sites to its property management department.
    That department has the task of evaluating each site, its condition,
    use, and tenants. If a repeater not known to be associated with the
    emergency management function of a local jurisdiction is found in a CAL
    FIRE vault, the default action is to move it out or subject it to
    commercial rental rates."

    ARRL Southwestern Division Director Dick Norton, N6AA, has been
    responding to inquiries with the same message. Read more.
    NASA Spacecraft Launches on Mission to Explore Frontier of Space

    NASA's Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) spacecraft is in orbit
    for a first-of-its-kind mission to study a region of space where
    changes can disrupt communications and satellite orbits, and even
    increase radiation risks to astronauts. ICON was launched on October 11
    after a Stargazer L-1011 aircraft from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station
    in Florida carried it to about 39,000 feet. Then, a Pegasus rocket
    fired the roughly refrigerator-sized ICON into space.

    +----------------------------------+
    |An artist's rendering of NASA's |
    |ICON spacecraft, which was |
    |launched into space last week at |
    |39,000 feet from a L-1011 |
    |Stargazer aircraft. [NASA image] |
    +----------------------------------+

    The spacecraft's solar panels successfully deployed, indicating it has
    power with all systems operating, NASA reported. ICON will start
    sending back its first science data in November.

    ICON will study changes in the ionosphere, where, in addition to
    affecting radio signal propagation, space weather can prematurely decay
    spacecraft orbits and expose astronauts to radiation-borne health
    risks. "Historically, this critical region of near-Earth space has been
    difficult to observe," NASA explained. "Spacecraft can't travel through
    the low parts of the ionosphere and balloons can't travel high enough."
    ICON's orbit around Earth places it at a 27ų inclination at an altitude
    of about 360 miles, from which it can observe the ionosphere around the
    equator.

    Nicola Fox, Director for Heliophysics at NASA Headquarters in
    Washington, said that ICON will be the first mission to simultaneously
    track what's happening in Earth's upper atmosphere and in space to see
    how the two interact, causing the kinds of changes that can disrupt
    radio communication. ICON will employ four instruments to explore the
    connections between the neutral atmosphere and the electrically charged
    ionosphere. Three of these rely on the phenomenon called airglow, which
    is created by a process similar to that which causes aurora -- gas is
    excited by radiation from the sun and emits light. By way of airglow,
    ICON can observe how particles throughout the upper atmosphere are
    moving. ICON's fourth instrument provides direct measurements of the
    ionosphere around it.

    Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) veteran Will
    Marchant, KW4WZ (ex-KC6ROL), is part of the ICON team.

    So Now What? Podcast

    "Ham Lingo" will be the focus of the new (October 17) episode of the So
    Now What? podcast for Amateur Radio newcomers.

    If you're a newly licensed Amateur Radio operator, chances are you have
    lots of questions. This biweekly podcast has answers! So Now What?
    offers insights from those who've been just where you are now. New
    episodes will be posted every other Thursday, alternating new-episode
    weeks with the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast.

    So Now What? is sponsored by LDG Electronics, a family owned and
    operated business with laboratories in southern Maryland that offers a
    wide array of antenna tuners and other Amateur Radio products.

    ARRL Communications Content Producer Michelle Patnode, W3MVP, and ARRL
    Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, co-host the podcast. Presented as a
    lively conversation, with Patnode representing newer hams and Carcia
    the veteran operators, the podcast will explore questions that newer
    hams may have and the issues that keep participants from staying active
    in the hobby. Some episodes will feature guests to answer questions on
    specific topic areas.

    Listeners can find So Now What? on Apple iTunes, Blubrry, Stitcher
    (free registration required, or browse the site as a guest), and
    through the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices.
    Episodes will be archived on the ARRL website.
    Next School Club Roundup Set for October 21 - 25

    ARRL's twice-yearly School Club Roundup (SCR) gets under way on Monday,
    October 21, at 1300 UTC, and runs through Friday, October 25, at 2359
    UTC. Stations may operate for up to 24 hours during the entire contest
    and for 6 hours during any single 24-hour period. Any mode -- SSB, CW,
    or digital -- is allowed for the event.

    Stations will participate in five categories: Elementary/Primary,
    Middle/Intermediate/Junior High School, Senior High School,
    College/University Club, and Non-School Club. There is also a category
    for Individuals to participate.

    The most popular time for younger students to be on the air is during
    after-school hours, but older students may be on the air at any time.
    Groups are limited to one transmitter on the air at any given time.
    Stations exchange signal report, category (School, Club, or
    Individual), and state, province, or DXCC entity. Stations can be
    worked once per band and mode. Participants will now be able to make up
    to three contacts with a station on each band using CW, voice, and
    digital modes.

    The School Club Roundup is co-sponsored by ARRL and the Long Island
    Mobile Amateur Radio Club (LIMARC), and results appear in QST as well
    as online. The top three entries in each category -- Elementary,
    Middle/Intermediate/Junior High School, Senior High School
    College/University -- will receive an award certificate. Non-school
    clubs or multioperator groups and individuals are also eligible for
    certificates.

    Submit scores and logs via the SCR score entry website. Scores and logs
    may be entered from the time the contest begins through the log
    submission deadline. Paper logs are acceptable as well. Logs for the
    October SCR are due by November 9.

    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: Solar activity remains very low. At
    the bottom of the sunspot cycle, any sunspot activity is fleeting.
    Another week has passed with no sunspots at all. Spaceweather.com
    reports no sunspots for the past 2 weeks, and the total number of
    spotless days this year is now 213, or 73%, which matches the
    percentage of spotless days in 2008 -- 11 years ago.

    Average daily solar flux during the week of October 10 - 16 was 67.3,
    down insignificantly from 67.6 during the previous week.

    The average daily planetary A index was 6.4, down from 14.4 over the
    previous week, and the average daily mid-latitude A index declined from
    11 to 5.1.

    The predicted solar flux for the next 45 days is 68, through the end of
    November.

    Predicted planetary A index is 5 on October 17 - 20; 12, 8, 5, 18, 25,
    12, 10, and 8 on October 21 - 28; 5 on October 29 - November 9; 8 on
    November 10 - 11; 5 on November 12 - 16; 15 on November 17; 5 on
    November 18 - 19; 15, 20, 10 and 8, on November 20 - 23, and 5 on
    November 24 - 30.

    Rick Tucker, W0RT, of Parsons, Kansas, was listening for HZ1TT (Saudi
    Arabia) on October 14 on 21.023 MHz at 1045 UTC. The band sounded dead,
    but at 1115 UTC he copied several European stations calling and working
    the Saudi station. Tucker said he never heard HZ1TT, but HZ1TT was
    spotted by a station in New Brunswick, Canada.

    Sunspot numbers for October 10 - 16 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0, with
    a mean of 3.1. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 67.5, 68.5, 68.3, 67.2,
    66.2, 67.2, and 66.3, with a mean of 67.3. Estimated planetary A
    indices were 13, 8, 5, 2, 6, 5, and 6, with a mean of 6.4. Middle
    latitude A index was 10, 6, 4, 1, 5, 5, and 5, with a mean of 5.1.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * October 18 -- Zombie Shuffle (CW)
    * October 19 -- Feld Hell Sprint
    * October 19 -- Argentina National 7 MHz Contest (Phone)
    * October 19 - 20 -- Araucaria World Wide VHF Contest (CW, phone)
    * October 19 - 20 -- ARRL EME Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * October 19 - 20 -- JARTS WW RTTY Contest
    * October 19 - 20 -- 10-10 International Fall Contest (CW)
    * October 19 - 20 -- All New York QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * October 19 - 20 -- Worked All Germany Contest (CW, phone)
    * October 19 - 20 -- Stew Perry Topband Challenge (CW)
    * October 20 -- Asia-Pacific Fall Sprint (CW)
    * October 20 -- UBA ON Contest, 2 Meters (CW, phone)
    * October 20 - 21 -- Illinois QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * October 20 -- RSGB RoLo CW
    * October 21 -- Run for the Bacon QRP Contest (CW)
    * October 21 - 25 -- ARRL School Club Roundup (CW, phone, digital)
    * October 21 - 22 -- Telephone Pioneers QSO Party (CW, phone,
    digital)
    * October 23 -- SKCC Sprint (CW)
    * October 23 -- RSGB 80-Meter Autumn Series (Digital)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on Amateur Radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.

    PACTOR Developer SCS Announces Monitoring Software

    SCS, the company that created PACTOR, has unveiled software that offers
    the ability to monitor the content of PACTOR 1, 2, and 3 transmissions
    over the air. The free PMON software runs under the Linux operating
    system. A software version to monitor PACTOR 4 is scheduled to become
    available next year. PMON will offer "thorough observation and
    documentation of all presently available PACTOR 1, 2, and 3
    transmissions," SCS said.

    "PMON covers all PACTOR levels with the appropriate speed levels and
    packet variations," SCS said. "PMON will read in parallel PACTOR 2 and
    PACTOR 1. The very wide receiving range (frequency offset ń200 Hz), as
    well as automatic sideband recognition, ease routine operation of PMON
    with PACTOR 2 and PACTOR 3 considerably."

    According to SCS, only minimal hardware is required to use PMON. The
    equipment complement includes a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ (minimum)
    computer and a USB sound device. SCS noted in an October 11 news
    release that all SCS PACTOR hardware modems include a command to allow
    PACTOR monitoring on the fly. The German company says PMON now makes
    this possible without a modem and adds the ability to decode
    B2F/LZHUF-compressed messages -- Winlink email and others.

    "This exciting new software development for Raspberry Pi complements
    and surpasses previously released SCS software that leveraged PACTOR
    modems' ability to monitor PACTOR to read Winlink for meaning," SCS
    said. The company also said the new software permits modem-less
    monitoring of all kinds, something that would be useful for monitoring
    Winlink email traffic.

    The Winlink Development Team called the new software a "welcome
    contribution to the Amateur Radio community."

    The issue of message encryption arose in recent months with respect to
    renewed attention to ARRL's so-called "symbol rate" petition for
    rulemaking (RM-11708) and the accommodation of automatically controlled
    digital stations (ACDS) -- many of which employ Winlink. Some
    commenters on ARRL's petition have asserted incorrectly that PACTOR
    facilitates de facto message encryption, which would violate FCC
    Amateur Service rules.

    AMSAT Goal: "Amateur Radio in Every CubeSat"

    AMSAT wants to see Amateur Radio in every CubeSat, and it's partnering
    with non-Amateur Radio partners to make that happen. In the "Apogee
    View" editorial for the September/October issue of The AMSAT Journal,
    Executive Vice President Paul Stoetzer, N8HM, wrote, "[W]e continue to
    support a stream of LEO satellites. RadFxSat-2/Fox-1E is ready for
    launch no earlier than December 1, 2019, on the ELaNa XX mission. The
    linear transponder and telemetry system carried aboard Fox-1E was
    designed for use in different CubeSats by merely adding an interface
    adapter for connection to the host bus."

    +-----------------------------+
    |AMSAT Executive Vice |
    |President Paul Stoetzer, |
    |N8HM. |
    +-----------------------------+

    Stoetzer said CubeSat programs interested in launching an Amateur Radio
    payload may partner with AMSAT to carry a Fox-1E module on their
    spacecraft. "By providing Amateur Radio capability, the CubeSat program
    gets a worldwide ground station network to receive their telemetry and
    experiment data while the Amateur Radio community gets a transponder to
    use in orbit," he pointed out.

    Stoetzer said the first such partnership will be with the Husky
    Satellite Lab at the University of Washington. Its 3U CubeSat --
    HuskySat-1 -- is set to launch on the ELaNa XXV mission from Wallops
    Island, Virginia, no sooner than November 2. A Northrop Grumman Cygnus
    spacecraft will carry HuskySat-1 to the International Space Station,
    and after completing its mission there, Cygnus will continue to an
    orbit of approximately 500 kilometers (310 miles) to deploy HuskySat-1.

    "After a 30-day mission to complete tests of its experimental payloads
    -- a pulsed plasma thruster, and a K-band (24 GHz) communications
    system -- the satellite will be turned over to AMSAT, and the linear
    transponder will be made available to the Amateur Radio community,"
    Stoetzer said.

    AMSAT will celebrate its 50th anniversary at its 2019 Board of
    Directors meeting and AMSAT Space Symposium October 18 - 20 in
    Arlington, Virginia. -- Thanks to AMSAT News Service
    Homebrew Heroes Award for 2019 in Amateur Radio Announced

    The Homebrew Heroes Award Program has announced its first annual
    recipient. He is Hans Summers, G0UPL, of East Sussex in the UK. The
    annual award recognizes individuals, groups, or organizations who help
    define the frontiers of Amateur Radio technology through the
    long-standing tradition of constructing their own equipment.

    +-------------------------------+
    |Homebrew Hero Hans Summers, |
    |G0UPL. |
    +-------------------------------+

    "Our Steering Committee sought the advice of an anonymous selection
    committee that surveyed the landscape of known homebrew designers in
    Amateur Radio," Steering Committee member Frank Howell, K4FMH, said in
    an October 13th news release. "There are indeed many very deserving
    ones! But only one can be chosen each year." Other Steering Committee
    members are Martin Butler, M1MRB, and Colin Butler, M6BOY -- all
    affiliated with the ICQ Podcast.

    For his part, Summers said he was humbled and "just blown away by it
    all" to be the first recognized with the Homebrew Heroes Award. Summers
    said he's been sharing his homebrew work and that of his company QRP
    Labs through his website for years. "To have these efforts publicly
    recognized in this way is so personally gratifying," Summers said.

    Martin Butler said that Summers "has continually demonstrated to all
    with at least one eye open that the traditional homebrew craft and
    science is alive and well."

    "I've watched Hans Summers continue to innovate in his design of
    terrific homebrew kits and products that have made a fantastic impact
    on the Amateur Radio marketplace," Colin Butler added. "As publisher of
    the ICQ Podcast, I am delighted for us to serve as the official
    promotional partner of this awards program." Read more.
    In Brief...

    Scouting's Jamboree on the Air (JOTA) takes place this weekend. The
    largest Scouting event in the world, with an estimated half-million
    participants, JOTA links Scouts and hams across the nation and around
    the world via Amateur Radio. Typical exchanges may include name,
    location, Scout rank, age, and hobbies. JOTA officially starts Friday
    evening during the "JOTA Jump Start" and runs through Sunday evening.
    The event will be competing for band spectrum with the popular Worked
    All Germany (WAG) contest. JOTA participants seeking contacts with
    stations in Europe should note that the WAG rules define contest-free
    segments, so the two events can operate at the same time with minimal
    problems. -- Thanks to Boy Scouts of America and Geert Jan de Groot,
    PE1HZG

    The legendary Radio Corporation of America (RCA) incorporated on this
    date, October 17, in 1919. RCA negotiated patent cross-licensing
    agreements with other industry leaders, paving the way for the
    explosive development of American radio in the early 1920s. In 1921,
    WCC in Chatham, Massachusetts, became the first RCA coastal station
    equipped with tube sets offering 2 kW on 600 and 2200 meters. The WCC
    Amateur Radio Association (WCCARA) continues its year-long celebration
    of the RCA centennial as WA1WCC/100RCA. -- Thanks to Ed Moxon, K1GGI,
    trustee, WCC commemorative station WA1WCC

    Two separate groups took advantage of the Amateur Radio Emergency Data
    Network (AREDN) to monitor wildfires in California. The Mariposa Area
    Amateur Radio Organization (MAARO) used the Amateur Radio mesh to
    stream -- via microwave -- video from the Briceburg Fire near Yosemite
    National Park. The Pleasant Valley Amateur Radio Club (PVARC) employed
    the AREDN mesh to stream video from the Saddle Ridge Fire near Los
    Angeles from a repeater site overlooking San Fernando Valley. The
    Briceburg and Saddle Ridge fires are now under control, but archived
    streams are still available. This is the same network that was used to
    stream video from the Thomas and Woolsey fires in 2017 and 2018,
    respectively. -- Thanks to Ben Kuo, AI6YR

    A mail delivery problem has affected delivery of West Gulf Division
    Board election ballots. Recent flooding has affected some US Postal
    Service distribution centers in the Houston area, damaging some sorting
    machines. This is delaying delivery to many members in that area. They
    are processing mail, but there are delays in processing bulk mail,
    which include the ballots. If you still do not receive your ballot by
    Monday, October 21, 2019, please send a request for a new ballot. ARRL
    Headquarters will process replacement requests on Tuesday, October 22,
    2019, via first-class mail and daily as later requests come in. Read
    more.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * October 18 - 19 -- Delta Division Convention, East Ridge, Tennessee
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    California
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    Rapids, Wisconsin
    * October 26 -- South Carolina Section Convention, Conway, South
    Carolina
    * November 2 - 3 -- Georgia State Convention, Lawrenceville, Georgia
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    City, Florida
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    Brookville, New York
    * January 17 - 18 -- North Texas Section Convention, Forest Hill,
    Texas
    * January 19 - 25 -- Quartzfest, Quartzsite, Arizona
    * January 24 - 26 -- Puerto Rico State Convention, Hatillo, Puerto
    Rico
    * January 25 -- ARRL Midwest Conference (Winterfest), Collinsville,
    Illinois

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

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    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Oct 25 09:05:16 2019
    The ARRL Letter
    October 24, 2019

    * ARRL Creates New Online Groups for Members to Communicate with
    Leadership
    * New ARRL Handbook and ARRL Antenna Book Editions Available in Your
    Favorite Format
    * New Antenna Concept Uses Saltwater and Plastic Instead of Metal
    Conductor
    * The Doctor Will See You Now!
    * IARU Secretary David Sumner, K1ZZ, Offers Amateur Radio Perspective
    on WRC-19
    * Pitcairn Island VP6R DXpedition Proving Popular; Injured Operator
    Evacuated
    * FCC Turns Down Petition to Amend Amateur Radio Identification Rules
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * MARS Members to Work with Radio Amateurs during SET and DOD COMEX
    19-4
    * Arizona Club Takes vantage of Low Bands to Support 100-Mile
    Endurance Run
    * Getting It Right!
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    ARRL Creates New Online Groups for Members to Communicate with
    Leadership

    ARRL's Committee on Communication with ARRL Members has opened new
    online forums where all radio amateurs -- ARRL members and non-members
    alike -- can discuss issues and topics in two-way conversation with
    ARRL leadership. The new groups are aimed at enhancing communication
    among ARRL leadership, staff, members, and prospective members, in a
    manner that enables timely updates and collegial discussion.

    This project was based on the success over the past several years of
    the ARRL-LoTW (Logbook of The World) Group in responding to Amateur
    Radio operators' questions and generating discussion on ways to improve
    that program. "The LoTW initiative has clearly demonstrated the
    effectiveness of online Groups as a means of achieving the desired
    interaction," ARRL said in announcing the new groups.

    ARRL has added three online groups:
    * ARRL-Contesting -- Moderated by ARRL Contest visory Committee
    Chairman Dennis Egan, W1UE.
    * ARRL-Awards -- Moderated by ARRL Radiosport and Field Services
    Manager Bart Jahnke, W9JJ.
    * ARRL-IARU -- Moderated by IARU Secretary Dave Sumner, K1ZZ.

    The existing ARRL-LOTW group, which has about 4,750 members, remains
    hosted by Groups.io but has moved.

    Everyone who subscribes to an ARRL Group is also automatically
    subscribed to the "ARRL Groups" group. This administrative feature will
    allow ARRL to convey routine announcements relevant to subscribers of
    all ARRL groups.

    ARRL IT Manager Michael Keane, K1MK, worked with Groups.io to set up
    the new groups. Since these new groups are hosted on a Groups.io
    platform, those wishing to subscribe must use a Groups.io username and
    password, if they have one, or create a Groups.io account if they
    don't.

    In the months ahead, the Committee envisions creating more online
    groups to support two-way communication focusing on areas of additional
    interest to radio amateurs, including ARRL activities, services,
    initiatives, and policies.

    ARRL currently hosts members-only online forums that include Awards and
    Contesting. While these forums will continue to operate, participants
    will be encouraged to post new threads in the appropriate new groups.

    Participants will be expected to adhere to some basic ground rules:
    * All questions are welcome, no matter how many times they have
    already been asked and answered, or how obvious the answers might
    be in the documentation.
    * Neither personal attacks nor foul language will be tolerated.
    Violators will immediately be placed on "moderated" status, meaning
    their subsequent posts will require Moderator approval until the
    Moderator's trust has been regained.
    * Individuals posting are reminded that these forums are open to
    everyone, including prospective hams and operators who are not ARRL
    members but may be thinking about joining. Civility and courtesy
    are expected, even when you may take issue with a post or thread
    topic. Read more.
    New ARRL Handbook and ARRL Antenna Book Editions Available in Your
    Favorite Format

    Now shipping, the latest editions of The ARRL Handbook for Radio
    Communications and The ARRL Antenna Book for Radio Communications are
    available in formats that best suit your needs. The 2020 edition of the
    Handbook offers three choices -- traditional softcover, a six-volume,
    shrink-wrapped book set (not a boxed set), and eBook digital editions.
    The 24th edition of the Antenna Book now is available as a four-volume
    boxed set, in addition to the traditional softcover version, and eBook
    digital editions. The Handbook and the Antenna Book also are available
    in Kindle editions.

    The 2020 Handbook

    The ARRL Handbook for Radio Communications limited-edition six-volume
    set is workbench friendly. Grab the volume you need without having to
    retrieve the entire Handbook. Volumes are divided by major topic areas.

    ARRL introduced the first edition of The Radio Amateur's Handbook in
    1926. Ever since, the Handbook has been recognized as a benchmark for
    radio communications learning and applied knowledge. This 97th edition
    is a complete guide to radio experimentation, discovery, and
    innovation.

    New Handbook projects and content include an analysis of Solar Cycle
    24, and discussion of what we can expect from Cycle 25; an
    easy-to-build RF choke that can squelch the line noise from your ac
    generator; a guide to compare rotator ratings and how to choose,
    install, and maintain rotators; an annual transceiver survey (don't buy
    your next radio before reading it), and supplemental content, such as a
    high-voltage switching power supply, a tunable RF preamplifier, a 10 W
    audio amplifier, and more, available for download.

    Both Handbook formats include a unique code so you can download and
    install a fully searchable digital edition of the printed book, as well
    as expanded supplemental content, software, PC board templates, and
    other support files.

    The Handbook six-volume book set, ARRL Item No. 1137, ISBN
    978-1-62595-113-7, is $59.95 retail. The Handbook softcover edition,
    ARRL Item No. 1076, ISBN 978-1-62595-107-6, is $49.95 retail. Order
    from the ARRL Store, from your ARRL Dealer, or call 860-594-0355 or,
    toll-free in the US, 888-277-5289. The Handbook Kindle edition comes in
    six separate volumes, automatically delivered to your Kindle, for $9.99
    per volume (Vol 1, Vol 2, Vol 3, Vol 4, Vol 5, Vol 6).

    The ARRL Antenna Book, 24th Edition

    ARRL introduces the limited-edition Antenna Book as a four-volume boxed
    set, divided into manageable volumes and including a hard slipcase for
    easy storage and access. Just reach for the volume you need without
    having to retrieve the entire Antenna Book. The four volumes are
    divided by major topic areas.

    Showcasing 80 years of antenna know-how, this 24th edition of the
    Antenna Book represents persistent pioneering development by radio
    amateurs, for radio amateurs. You'll find new and time-tested antenna
    projects for nearly any conceivable circumstance.

    New Antenna Book projects and content include info about the highly
    popular HF transmitting loops; an all-new chapter on VHF/UHF antennas;
    some new MF, HF, and 6-meter antennas; the importance of ground and
    bonding; how to troubleshoot your antenna tuner quickly and easily;
    getting the most out of your antenna analyzer, and designing a
    high-performance "Band-Optimized Log Periodic Dipole Array."

    Both editions of the Antenna Book include a unique code that lets you
    download and install a fully searchable digital edition of the printed
    book and offers expanded supplemental content, software, PC board
    templates, and other support files.

    The Antenna Book four-volume boxed set, ARRL Item No. 1144, ISBN
    978-1-62595-114-4, is $64.95 retail. The Antenna Book softcover
    edition, ARRL Item No. 1113, ISBN 978-1-62595-111-3, is $49.95 retail.
    The Antenna Book eBook edition, ARRL Item No. 1113MLD for Mac/Linux or
    ARRL Item No. 1113WD for Windows is $49.95. Order from the ARRL Store,
    from your ARRL Dealer, or call 860-594-0355 or toll-free in the US,
    888-277-5289. The Antenna Book Kindle edition comes in four separate
    volumes, automatically delivered to your Kindle, for $9.99 per volume
    (Vol 1, Vol 2, Vol 3, Vol 4). Read more.

    New Antenna Concept Uses Saltwater and Plastic Instead of Metal
    Conductor

    A new antenna that uses saltwater and plastic instead of metal could
    make it easier to build VHF and UHF networks, an IEEE Spectrum article
    asserts.

    Michelle Hamson says, "Being able to focus the energy of a radio signal
    toward a given receiver means you can increase the range and efficiency
    of transmissions," in her article, "New Antenna Uses Saltwater and
    Plastic to Steer Radio Beams." According to the article, beam-steering
    or beamforming on a large scale is one of the key underlying mechanisms
    behind the rollout of 5G networks. The configuration of the saltwater
    antenna allows 360ų beam-steering and works for frequencies between 334
    and 488 MHz.

    In a recent publication in IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation
    Letters, Lei Xing and her colleagues at the College of Electronic and
    Information Engineering at Nanjing University of Aeronautics and
    Astronautics in China have proposed a new saltwater-based antenna that
    achieves 12 directional beam-steering states, and one omnidirectional
    state.

    "The proposed design consists of a circular ground plane, with 13
    transparent acrylic tubes that can be filled with (or emptied of) salt
    water on demand. One tube is located in the center to act as a driven
    monopole. Surrounding it are 12 parasitic monopoles," the article
    explains. "The 12 remaining monopoles, when filled with water, work
    together to act as reflectors and give the broadcasted signal
    direction."

    "The attractive feature of using water monopoles is that both the water
    height and activating status can be dynamically tuned through
    microfluidic techniques, which has a higher degree of design
    flexibility than metal antennas," explains Xing.

    One limitation of salt water-based antennas, she notes, is that that
    the permittivity of salt water -- i.e, how it interacts with electrical
    fields -- is sensitive to temperature variations.
    The Doctor Will See You Now!

    "Beverage Antennas" is the topic of the new (October 24) episode of the
    ARRL The Doctor is In podcast. Listen...and learn!

    Sponsored by DX Engineering, ARRL The Doctor is In is an informative
    discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet, or
    smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like!

    Every 2 weeks, your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve Ford, WB8IMY, and
    the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, will discuss a broad range of
    technical topics. You can also email your questions to doctor@arrl.org,
    and the Doctor may answer them in a future podcast.

    Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone or
    iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can also
    listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration required,
    or browse the site as a guest) and through the free Stitcher app for
    iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never listened to a podcast
    before, download our beginner's guide.

    IARU Secretary David Sumner, K1ZZ, Offers Amateur Radio Perspective on
    WRC-19

    Writing in a special World Radiocommunication Conference 2019 (WRC-19)
    edition of ITU News Magazine, International Amateur Radio Union (IARU)
    Secretary David Sumner, K1ZZ, offers an overview of conference agenda
    items and issues pertaining to amateur radio in his article, "Views of
    the International Amateur Radio Union on WRC-19 Agenda Items." WRC-19
    gets under way on October 28 in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, and continues
    until November 22.

    Sumner noted that the IARU has participated in ITU conferences since
    1927 and is a member of the ITU Radiocommunication and Development
    sectors. According to Sumner, the IARU's overall objectives for WRC-19
    are global harmonization of the amateur 50 - 54 MHz allocation;
    maintenance of existing spectrum access for amateurs, and strengthening
    protections for radiocommunication services against interference from
    other RF generators.

    "When new technology is developed that generates radiofrequency energy,
    it is essential that adequate protection of radiocommunication services
    be included in the system design," Sumner said. He concluded by noting,
    "No future agenda items for new or harmonized spectrum allocations for
    the amateur services are being sought at WRC-19. This position does not
    preclude seeking specific allocations in the unallocated spectrum above
    275 GHz, if allocations to other services are considered. IARU is
    carefully monitoring proposals for future agenda items that may impact
    existing amateur and amateur-satellite allocations." Read more.
    Pitcairn Island VP6R DXpedition Proving Popular; Injured Operator
    Evacuated

    At mid-week, the Pitcairn Island VP6R DXpedition reported some 35,000
    contacts in the log, including what team leader Glenn Johnson, W0GJ,
    called "a lot of activity" on 12 and 10 meters. VP6R also has been
    taking advantage of FT8 digital protocol, operating in fox/hound (F/H)
    mode. The team arrived at the South Pacific island on October 17 and at
    the home of Andy Christian, where the DXpedition's equipment had been
    shipped well in advance.

    The team is down to 12 operators after one individual fell and suffered
    several fractures. "Our evacuated team member has made it to the
    hospital in Papeete, French Polynesia," Johnson said in a mid-week
    update. "DXpeditions to remote places are not without risk, and medical
    care is quite limited at best," he pointed out in an earlier report.
    The injured operator is not being identified for privacy reasons.

    By Saturday, the DXpedition team had settled into its operating routine
    from two sites -- one at Christian's home and the other at an old radio
    station site that is serving as VP6R's primary low-band site. "Pitcairn
    has power from 8 AM until 10 PM," Johnson explained. "After 10 PM, we
    switch to generators until morning. The 'radio site' is 100% generator
    powered."

    Johnson stressed that those attempting to work VP6R on FT8 in F/H mode
    must use a frequency above 1,000 Hz; the DXpedition is transmitting
    somewhere below 500 Hz. "The software will move your transmit frequency
    down automatically when your turn comes up in the queue, if you have
    F/H mode set up properly," he said. "If you see your FT8 contact
    confirmed with 'RR73,' you can be assured that you are in the log."

    VP6R is active around the clock on 20 meters on more than one mode. The
    DXpedition team will be on all bands during the CQ World Wide DX phone
    contest, October 25 - 26. The VP6R logs are periodically uploaded to
    Club Log.

    Third-graders at Dorothy Grant Elementary School in Fontana,
    California, and their teacher Bev Matheson, WA6BK, are following the
    Pitcairn Island DXpedition teams travels and amateur radio operation,
    using the school's club station, K6DGE. They will talk with DXpedition
    team members and learn about Pitcairn Island, some geography, a bit
    about early explorers, navigation, the oceans, ecology, different
    customs and heritages, and communication skills. "We are thrilled to
    have these kids following us and expanding their world through amateur
    radio," the VP6R team said on its website.

    FCC Turns Down Petition to Amend Amateur Radio Identification Rules

    The FCC has denied a Petition for Rule Making (PRM) to amend Part 97
    station identification rules to better accommodate and simplify station
    identification during emergency nets, drills, or activations. ARRL
    member Robert A. Dukish, KK8DX, of Canfield, Ohio, had sought a change
    to Section 97.119(a) of the rules to allow a single point of
    transmission for station ID on those occasions. He proposed permitting
    a net control station or other designated participant to announce the
    call signs of every station taking part in the net or exercise, when
    tactical call signs often are in use, at 10-minute intervals, using
    automatic CW identification.

    In turning down Dukish's petition, Scot Stone, the Deputy Chief of the
    Wireless Telecommunications Bureau's Mobility Division, said commenters
    overwhelmingly opposed the proposal.

    "They argue that the current rule strikes the appropriate balance
    between the need to identify the source of transmissions and ease of
    communication," Stone wrote. "Commenters state that, in their years of
    experience with amateur emergency communications, the station
    identification requirement has not proven to be a burden or obstacle,
    and that the current procedure actually contributes to efficient
    operations by providing a clear indication that a communication has
    ended and the channel is available."

    Stone said some commenters asserted that Dukish's proposed procedure
    would be unworkable and cause confusion, while others characterized his
    proposal as a solution in search of a problem.

    "The purpose of the station identification requirement is to make the
    source of transmissions clearly known to those receiving those
    transmissions," Stone wrote. "Separating the call sign from each
    transmission would defeat this purpose." Moreover, he said there's no
    evidence that the current station ID requirements have hindered amateur
    radio emergency communications.
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: On Monday, October 21, the
    10.7-centimeter solar flux sank to its lowest level in recorded
    history. The solar flux was 64, just slightly lower than the 64.4 flux
    value recorded on July 2, 1954, at the start of Solar Cycle 19, which
    was by far the biggest solar cycle ever recorded. I understand that the
    solar flux dipped to 64.2 in 1906.

    Over the October 17 - 23 reporting week, the average daily solar flux
    was 65.3 -- 2 points lower than last week. The average daily planetary
    A index dropped from 6.4 to 4.7, while the average daily mid-latitude A
    index declined from 5.1 to 3.1. And, of course, no sunspots showed up.

    Predicted solar flux for the next 45 days is 66 on every day from
    October 24 through December 7.

    The predicted planetary A index is 22 and 30 on October 24 - 25; 15 on
    October 26 - 28; 8 on October 29; 5 on October 30 - November 16; 15, 8,
    and 5 on November 17 - 19; 20 and 24 on November 20 - 21; 15 on
    November 22 - 23; 12 and 8 on November 24 - 25, and 5 on November 26 -
    December 7.

    Sunspot numbers for October 17 - 23 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0, for a
    mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 66.1, 66.1, 66, 65, 64, 65.6,
    and 64.5, for a mean of 65.3. Estimated planetary A indices were 6, 6,
    5, 6, 5, 3, and 2, with a mean of 4.7. The middle latitude A index was
    4, 4, 3, 4, 4, 2, and 1, with a mean of 3.1.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted on Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * October 26 - 27 -- CQ World Wide DX Contest, SSB
    * October 30 -- UKEICC 80-Meter Contest (CW)
    * October 31 -- RSGB 80-Meter Autumn Series, SSB

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on amateur radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    MARS Members to Work with Radio Amateurs during SET and DOD COMEX 19-4

    During October and corresponding with the ARRL Simulated Emergency Test
    (SET), Military Auxiliary Radio System (MARS) members will be reaching
    out to the amateur radio community to continue building working
    relationships and improving interoperability. As part of this effort,
    MARS will be promoting the use of a serial phase-shift keying protocol,
    Military Standard 188-110 (M110), on the 60-meter interoperability
    channels. Radio amateurs are authorized to use this digital mode on the
    five 60-meter interop channels, although M110 exceeds the allowable
    symbol rate that radio amateurs may use on all other HF bands.

    Starting on November 2 and continuing until November 17, the MARS
    community will be executing Department of Defense (DOD) Communications
    Exercise (COMEX) 19-4. MARS members will use the exercise to continue
    training and refining their operator skills to provide situational
    awareness information, such as county status reports and weather
    observations.

    To announce the kickoff of the exercise, WWV and WWVH will broadcast
    voice announcements starting on or about October 31. WWV will transmit
    the announcements at 10 minutes past the hour, while WWVH will transmit
    them at 10 minutes before the hour.

    The communication exercise will culminate on the evening of November 16
    with military stations sending M110 messages to the amateur community
    on 60-meter channel 1 (5330.5 kHz USB).
    Arizona Club Takes vantage of Low Bands to Support 100-Mile Endurance
    Run

    The Coconino Amateur Radio Club (CARC) provided safety and coordination
    communications for the 100-mile Stagecoach Line Run over the September
    21 - 22 weekend. This 31-hour endurance run from Flagstaff to the Grand
    Canyon takes place every September. Supporting the event requires
    planning and commitment. Because of the geographical coverage required,
    the club's amateur radio support even took advantage of 160 meters,
    which is not a band typically associated with public service
    communication.

    The Hull Cabin checkpoint, south of
    the Grand Canyon, with Bill Smith,
    KQ1S, and Hannah Seidler on duty.
    [Photo courtesy of Bill Smith,
    KQ1S]

    "Because we are in a solar minimum, a combination of bands and
    communication methods were required in order to track and maintain
    contact with the numerous stations," said Dan Shearer, N7YIQ, the
    club's Public Information Officer. "What worked well at 3 o'clock in
    the afternoon was not going to work at 2 in the morning." The club's
    communication infrastructure required a combination of HF and VHF/UHF
    equipment that included setting up portable repeaters and stations
    powered by generators and other power sources.

    "When you add in the cold weather of the high desert in September and
    the possibility of rain and snow, this becomes a test of what Amateur
    Radio may be called upon to do to support a disaster somewhere in the
    nation," Shearer said.

    CARC members invested more than 300 hours of their time in planning and
    supporting the race, helped by a few additional volunteers from
    Glendale and Prescott. Nineteen club members staffed eight sites, where
    volunteers set up camps and kept vigil through the night to track and
    make sure runners were accounted for throughout the race.

    A typical race checkpoint. This one
    was north of Flagstaff. [Scott
    Downard, N7SMD, photo]

    In addition to tracking runners into and out of each aid station, net
    control entered these times into an online spreadsheet as they
    progressed through the race, allowing runners to be located easily in
    case they did not make it to the next checkpoint.

    During the event, CARC members helped locate two missing runners and
    helped save the life of another who developed severe asthma. Medical
    care and treatment during these types of extreme events poses a
    significant challenge, as EMS responses are delayed. "Much of the area
    between Flagstaff and the Grand Canyon is US Forest Service land, and
    travel through these areas by vehicles is slow," Shearer explained.
    "Severe emergencies can only be handled by aircraft, if conditions
    permit."

    During the race, 75 meters worked well during the day, but 160 meters
    was put into play after dark. Cross-band repeaters were placed at
    remote sites to allow access to existing repeaters. Although VHF and
    UHF were used, these links at times became unusable, and alternate
    forms and bands were required to maintain contact.
    Getting It Right!

    The item, "PACTOR Developer SCS Announces Monitoring Software," which
    appeared in the October 17 edition of The ARRL Letter, included some
    inaccurate language. The story should have said, "The issue of message
    transparency arose in recent months with respect to renewed attention
    to ARRL's so-called 'symbol rate' petition for rulemaking (RM-11708)
    and the accommodation of automatically controlled digital stations
    (ACDS) -- many of which employ Winlink. Some commenters on ARRL's
    petition have asserted incorrectly that PACTOR facilitates de facto
    message encryption, which would violate FCC Amateur Service rules."
    (Neither Winlink nor PACTOR are encrypted.)

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * October 26 -- South Carolina Section Convention, Conway, South
    Carolina
    * November 2 - 3 -- Georgia State Convention, Lawrenceville, Georgia
    * November 16 -- Indiana Section Convention, Fort Wayne, Indiana
    * December 13 - 14 -- West Central Florida Section Convention, Plant
    City, Florida
    * January 4 -- New York City-Long Island Section Convention,
    Brookville, New York
    * January 17 - 18 -- North Texas Section Convention, Forest Hill,
    Texas
    * January 19 - 25 -- Quartzfest, Quartzsite, Arizona
    * January 24 - 26 -- Puerto Rico State Convention, Hatillo, Puerto
    Rico
    * January 25 -- ARRL Midwest Conference (Winterfest), Collinsville,
    Illinois

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
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    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Nov 1 09:05:18 2019
    The ARRL Letter
    October 31, 2019

    * World Radiocommunication Conference 2019 Opens in Egypt
    * Congressional Champion of Amateur Radio Greg Walden, W7EQI,
    Announces Retirement
    * Taking vantage of Coaxial Cable Capacitance
    * So Now What? Podcast
    * ARRL November Sweepstakes Offers Two Weekends of Fun
    * ARRL Headquarters Welcomes New Section Managers for Orientation
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * Revised AMSAT-NA Website in Development
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    World Radiocommunication Conference 2019 Opens in Egypt

    World Radiocommunication Conference 2019 (WRC-19) is under way in Sharm
    el-Sheikh, Egypt. More than 3,500 delegates from 193 member-states
    around the world are attending the month-long gathering, sponsored by
    the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), which opened on
    Monday, October 28. WRC-19 delegates will discuss changes to the ITU
    Radio Regulations. Amateur radio issues are but a small part of the
    conference agenda. The ITU is characterizing the aim of the conference
    as forging pathways for future digital communications.

    "WRC-19 [is] to manage scarce radio-frequency spectrum for rapidly
    evolving terrestrial and space-based communication technologies," ITU
    said in a news release, describing WRC-19 as an "international
    treaty-making conference governing the global management of scarce
    radio-frequency spectrum as well as geostationary-satellite and
    non-geostationary-satellite orbits." UN Secretary-General Ant¢nio
    Guterres addressed WRC-19 by video.

    The International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) and its member-societies
    are representing the Amateur and Amateur Satellite Services with a team
    of 14 people from 10 countries. Agenda Items of particular interest to
    IARU are:
    * Agenda Item 1.1, to allocate spectrum in the 50 - 54 MHz Region in
    Region 1 to the Amateur Service.
    * Agenda Item 1.13, to consider new spectrum for International Mobile
    Telecommunications, which could potentially impact amateur spectrum
    at around 47 GHz.
    * Agenda Item 1.16, which could impact amateur spectrum at 5 GHz.
    * Agenda Item 9.1.6, addressing Wireless Power Transmission (WPT),
    where harmonics of WPT systems could negatively impact the MF/HF
    radio spectrum.
    * Agenda Item 10, to consider WRC-23 agenda items that could impact
    the Amateur Service, including the 1240 - 1300 MHz band.

    "This meeting is the culmination of 4 years' work by IARU in ITU and
    regional telecommunications organizations to protect and enhance
    Amateur Service frequency allocations," IARU said.

    At WRC-19 this week, the official document on IARU WRC-19 positions on
    various current agenda items and views on future proposals that may
    impact the Amateur Service was released. Also released was the detailed
    50 MHz study report that provides the basis for the consideration of
    Agenda Item 1.1. In addition to classical narrow-band analog usage, the
    study considers wider-bandwidth digital systems.

    IARU Secretary David Sumner, K1ZZ, reported on the ITU
    Radiocommunication Assembly (RA) that took place in Sharm el-Sheikh
    just ahead of WRC-19.

    "Last week, the RA met to approve standards developed during the 2015 -
    2019 cycle of work in the ITU Radiocommunication Sector and to begin
    planning the work for the next 4 years," Sumner said in a post to the
    ARRL IARU Group. Sumner said Brazilian delegation member Flavio
    Archangelo, PY2ZX, with the support of several other administrations,
    pressed for greater attention to the growing problem of radio noise.

    "There is tight security around the conference center and the official
    hotels," Sumner reported.
    Congressional Champion of Amateur Radio Greg Walden, W7EQI, Announces
    Retirement

    One of amateur radio's strongest supporters in the US House of
    Representatives, Oregon Republican Greg Walden, W7EQI -- the top
    Republican on the powerful House Energy and Commerce Committee -- said
    this week that he will not seek another term in 2020. Walden, 62, who
    will have served for 22 years in the US House at the end of his current
    term, championed the Amateur Radio Parity Act as the chair of the
    Subcommittee on Communications and Technology. He went on to chair the
    US House Energy and Commerce Committee in the 115th Congress, and has
    served as the panel's ranking member since the Democratic Party gained
    control of the House.

    "I will close the public service chapter of my life, thankful for the
    friends I've made and the successful work we've done together," Walden
    said in a statement.

    In 2014, the ARRL Board of Directors voted to confer the first Barry
    Goldwater, K7UGA, Achievement Award "in recognition of many years of
    exceptional contributions to the strength and vitality of the Amateur
    Radio Service in the United States."

    In 2002, Walden was an original cosponsor of H.R. 4720, the Amateur
    Radio Emergency Communications Consistency Act, which aimed to provide
    relief to amateurs faced with private deed covenants, conditions, and
    restrictions -- CC&Rs -- in erecting antennas by requiring private
    land-use regulators, such as homeowners' associations, to "reasonably
    accommodate" amateur radio communication

    In 2003, he cosponsored H.R. 713, the Amateur Radio Spectrum Protection
    Act, and during a hearing on the bill, Walden called for a halt to the
    "astonishing" erosion of amateur radio spectrum.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    "Despite [ham radio's] widespread use and importance in times of
    emergencies, land-use restrictions in some areas have prioritized
    esthetics over the rights of hams. -- US Representative Greg Walden,
    W7EQI

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    In 2004, Walden wrote the FCC chairman, seeking to have the Commission
    defer action on the Broadband over Power Lines (BPL) rulemaking until
    the release of a National Telecommunications and Information
    ministration (NTIA) study and an opportunity for public comment. That
    same year, during a hearing on telecom convergence, Walden grilled a
    BPL industry representative about interference.

    In 2010, Walden cosponsored H.R. 2160, the Amateur Radio Emergency
    Communications Enhancement Act -- a subsequent bill addressing the
    issue of private land-use constraints on amateur radio antennas.

    In 2011, ARRL was invited to testify before Walden's subcommittee on
    "Creating an Interoperable Public Safety Network," offering an
    opportunity to defend 420 - 440 MHz against reallocation.

    During a 2016 Capitol Hill hearing, Walden called the Amateur Radio
    Parity Act (H.R. 1301) "a commonsense bill" and urged his colleagues to
    support it.

    "As a ham radio operator, I'm acutely aware of the passion that amateur
    radio operators have for their service," Walden told the subcommittee.
    "Despite [ham radio's] widespread use and importance in times of
    emergencies, land-use restrictions in some areas have prioritized
    esthetics over the rights of hams. H.R. 1301 seeks to ensure that
    amateur radio operators get a fair shake and protection from
    unnecessary bans on their equipment by instructing the FCC to adopt
    rules to this end."

    Taking vantage of Coaxial Cable Capacitance

    Jeff Blaine, AC0C, had a bad capacitor in the 15-meter filter section
    of his 5B4AGN multiband band-pass filter, because as he puts it, "they
    have been treated terribly over the years." One way to damage a filter
    is to use power levels at the limit of the filter into a load that
    presents a high SWR -- especially a high duty cycle mode like RTTY. He
    didn't have the required small 14 pF capacitor, so he trimmed a piece
    of

    Jeff, AC0C, used a small length of
    RG58 coaxial cable to replace a
    failed low-value capacitor in a
    bandpass filter. [Jeff Blaine, AC0C,
    photo]

    RG-58 to the required value - coaxial cable exhibits a certain amount
    of capacitance per unit length.

    "The repaired 15-meter filter runs 1.10:1 or better SWR across the band
    with an insertion loss of about 0.65 dB," he reports. Blaine advises
    that the RG-58 "can be coiled up and secured with some tie wraps" and
    that it should be kept away from the toroid to minimize interaction --
    a half-inch is probably sufficient. This approach may work well for
    other applications where a low-value capacitor is difficult to obtain
    and space is available.

    Blaine uses an L/C meter to measure the capacitance as the piece of
    cable is trimmed to approach the target value, and he leaves the cable
    about a quarter of an inch, then trims the braid back to increase the
    distance between it and the center conductor. He puts shrink wrap over
    the end, and measures the passband of the filter section with the
    chassis cover in place. -- Thanks to the ARRL Contest Update
    So Now What? Podcast

    "A Halloween and Throwback Special with QST Senior Editor, Jen Glifort,
    KC1KNL," will be the focus of the new (October 17) episode of the So
    Now What? podcast for amateur radio newcomers.

    If you're a newly licensed amateur radio operator, chances are you have
    lots of questions. This biweekly podcast has answers! So Now What?
    offers insights from those who've been just where you are now. New
    episodes will be posted every other Thursday, alternating new-episode
    weeks with the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast.

    So Now What? is sponsored by LDG Electronics, a family owned and
    operated business with laboratories in southern Maryland that offers a
    wide array of antenna tuners and other amateur radio products.

    ARRL Communications Content Producer Michelle Patnode, W3MVP, and W1AW
    Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, co-host the podcast. Presented as a
    lively conversation, with Patnode representing newer hams and Carcia
    the veteran operators, the podcast will explore questions that newer
    hams may have and the issues that keep participants from staying active
    in the hobby. Some episodes will feature guests to answer questions on
    specific topic areas.

    Listeners can find So Now What? on Apple iTunes, Blubrry, Stitcher
    (free registration required, or browse the site as a guest), and
    through the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices.
    Episodes will be archived on ARRL's website.

    ARRL November Sweepstakes Offers Two Weekends of Fun

    The ARRL November Sweepstakes (SS) weekends again loom large on the
    amateur radio contest horizon. The CW weekend is November 2 - 4 -- this
    weekend -- while the phone weekend is November 16 - 18. Both events
    begin on Saturday at 2100 UTC and conclude on Monday at 0259 UTC. An
    Operating Guide that relates some of the history and evolution of these
    North American contests is available. SS offers operating categories
    for every preference. The goal for many seasoned SS operators is to
    complete a "clean sweep" by working all 83 ARRL and Radio Amateurs of
    Canada (RAC) Sections. Some may just want to dabble. Others enjoy
    trying to make a clean sweep by working one station in each section.
    Most SS operators, though, simply try to run up the contact and
    multiplier counts, staying in the chair for the full 24 (out of 30)
    allowable hours.

    Some multipliers are much rarer than others, although these can shift
    from one event to the next. Stations in Puerto Rico and the Virgin
    Islands have been absent in recent years after hurricanes devastated
    those areas. Northern Territories (NT) is often the most difficult, and
    for a while, it looked as though the NT mainstay, VY1AAA (at the Yukon
    Territory station of J. Allen, VY1JA), might not be on the air this
    month. Allen has stepped away from amateur radio, and his station was
    supposed to have been dismantled already. But circumstances changed,
    the VY1JA station is still intact, and Gerry Hull, W1VE/VE1RM, says
    he'll be making the NT multiplier available to the SS multitude.

    "100% I will be on with guns blazing, CW and SSB," Hull told ARRL this
    week. "The big 'if' was getting J's Alpha 9500 back in working order,
    and that happened last Friday. After that, we are done. So, a sweep
    will be possible."

    Hull will operate VY1AAA remotely from New Hampshire. He said that for
    the CW event this weekend, he'll either stay very low in the band --
    the bottom 5 kHz -- or operate above 40 kHz to avoid interference. And
    while he's a snappy CW operator, he promises to slow down for anyone.

    "The trick will be finding my own Section," Hull added. "Let's see if
    the propagation gods are with us. I hope so, for this swan song."

    Once the VY1JA station is finally dismantled, VY1AAA will also be off
    the air, unless Hull is able to secure another station. Hull told ARRL
    earlier this year that he's been searching for several months for
    another Northern Territories station that would be willing to host
    remote operation.

    Allen cited long-term health issues and hearing loss for his decision
    to retire from ham radio, and his familiar VY1JA call sign will retire
    with him.

    Gerry Hull, W1VE/VE1RM, operates
    VY1AAA remotely during ARRL Field
    Day.

    "The VY1AAA team is greatly saddened by this turn of events," Hull
    said. "Hams around the world will surely miss J and the VY1AAA team on
    the bands. J has been an incredible friend and mentor." Over the past 4
    years, VY1AAA has logged more than 35,000 contacts, and QSL requests
    will continue to be honored.

    Operators with limited time to get on the air may want to raise the
    excitement level by "running" -- i.e, calling CQ -- a lot of stations
    or by operating later in the contest, when the SS regulars will be on
    the lookout for call signs they have not yet encountered.

    For both the CW and phone events, stations exchange a sequential serial
    number (no leading zeros needed), an operating category (precedence),
    call sign, the last two digits of the year of first license for either
    operator or station (check), and ARRL/RAC Section.

    Many areas of the US change from daylight saving time to standard time
    at 2 AM local time on November 3 by moving clocks back 1 hour. UTC is
    not affected. -- Thanks to Gerry Hull, W1VE/VE1RM, and The ARRL Contest
    Update
    ARRL Headquarters Welcomes New Section Managers for Orientation

    Back row (L - R): Rick Breininger,
    N1TEK (Wyoming); Tom Preiser, N2XW
    (Southern New Jersey); John
    Gotthardt, K1UAF (New Hampshire);
    Dan Marler, K7REX (Idaho), and
    Lelia Garner, WA0UIG (Iowa).
    Bottom row (L - R): Paul Stiles,
    KF7SOJ (Montana), Steve Ewald,
    WV1X (ARRL Field Services
    Manager), Steve Smith, KG5VK
    (North Texas). [Michelle Patnode,
    W3MVP, photo]

    Newly elected ARRL Section Managers were at ARRL Headquarters October
    11 - 13 for the 2019 New Section Manager Workshop. Attendees got a
    detailed tour through ARRL Headquarters to meet and talk with staff
    leaders and staff members, participated in various training and
    orientation presentations and discussions, and enjoyed the chance to
    operate W1AW. Attending were Tom Preiser, N2XW (Southern New Jersey);
    Paul Stiles, KF7SOJ (Montana); Steven Lott Smith, KG5VK (North Texas);
    Dan Marler, K7REX (Idaho); Rick Breininger, N1TEK (Wyoming); John
    Gotthardt, K1UAF (New Hampshire), and Lelia Garner, WA0UIG (Iowa). --
    Thanks to Steve Ewald, WV1X

    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: Still no sunspots, but average daily
    solar flux rose this week from 65.3 to 68.5 -- yet there have been
    surprising reports of HF stations heard and worked over long distances.

    On Friday and Saturday, a coronal hole let loose a solar wind stream,
    causing geomagnetic instability, and the average daily planetary A
    index rose from 4.7 to 16.4.

    Predicted solar flux has increased recently, with values of 70 on
    October 31 - November 7; 66 on November 8-23; 70 on November 24 -
    December 6, and 69 on December 7-14.

    Predicted planetary A index is 8 on October 31 - November 1; 5 on
    November 2-4; 8 and 10 on November 5-6; 5 on November 7-16; 15, 8, and
    5 on November 17-19; 20 and 24 on November 20-21; 15 on November 22-23;
    12 on November 24; 5 and 15 on November 25-26; 12 on November 27-28,
    and 5 on November 29 - December 14.

    Sunspot numbers for October 24 - 30 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0, with
    a mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 65, 68.6, 68.6, 68.8, 69.4,
    69.2, and 69.7, with a mean of 68.5. Estimated planetary A indices were
    18, 29, 25, 15, 11, 8, and 9, with a mean of 16.4. Middle latitude A
    index was 12, 29, 17, 11, 8, 8, and 6, with a mean of 13.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * November 1 -- Silent Key Memorial Contest (CW)
    * November 2 -- IPARC Contest (CW)
    * November 2 - 3 -- Ukrainian DX Contest (CW, phone)
    * November 2 - 4 -- ARRL November Sweepstakes (CW)
    * November 3 -- IPARC Contest (SSB)
    * November 3 -- EANET Sprint (CW, phone, digital)
    * November 3 -- High Speed Club CW Contest
    * November 4 -- RSGB FT4 Contest Series
    * November 5 -- ARS Spartan Sprint (CW)
    * November 6 -- UKEICC 80-Meter Contest (Phone)
    * November 7 -- NRAU 10-Meter Activity Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * November 7 -- SKCC Sprint Europe (CW)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on amateur radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.

    Revised AMSAT-NA Website in Development

    AMSAT Treasurer and Vice President of User Services Robert Bankston,
    KE4AL, has announced that the AMSAT Board has approved his
    recommendations for an internet-based membership management system, the
    transition to a digital full-color edition of AMSAT Journal, and a
    complete overhaul of the AMSAT-NA website.

    "I have been putting together these proposals for several months and
    thank the Board of Directors for the permission to move these projects
    forward," Bankston said at the conclusion of the 2019 AMSAT Symposium
    and Annual General Meeting over the weekend. He said the improvements
    will modernize how AMSAT serves its members and that the new membership
    management system will give members control over their membership
    accounts, allowing them to update contact information, pay dues, and
    register for events. He did not indicate when the updated website would
    be up and running.

    Bankston said the new website will aim to make navigating the site more
    intuitive with portals for members and friends in the AMSAT community,
    how-to guides on getting started in amateur radio satellites, and
    information about current satellites and what is needed to work them.

    "In addition, the program will automatically push out reminders,
    newsletters, and a digital copy of the AMSAT Journal," Bankston
    explained. "Transitioning to a digitally delivered AMSAT Journal will
    allow us to provide a full-color magazine without raising the cost of
    membership. In addition, we will have the opportunity to provide
    member-only content on our website and to include back issues of our
    AMSAT Journal."

    AMSAT is marking its 50th anniversary in 2019. -- Thanks to AMSAT News
    Service
    In Brief...

    Results and certificates from the Hiram Percy Maxim (HPM) Birthday
    Celebration August 31 - September 8 are now available. The 9-day
    operating event commemorated the 150th anniversary of the birth of ARRL
    cofounder and first president Hiram Percy Maxim, W1AW. Amateurs from 57
    ARRL/RAC Sections and four countries submitted more than 25,000
    contacts over the course of the event. Results of the event and
    downloadable certificates are on the ARRL Contests Page. A special HPM
    150 QSL card is available for stations that worked W1AW/150 during the
    event. To receive a card, send your QSL with an SASE to W1AW, 225 Main
    St., Newington, CT 06111.

    The ARRL Foundation has announced for additional recipients of
    scholarships that it manages. The Albemarle Scholarship was awarded to
    Dalton Southerland, W1DGS, of Louisburg, North Carolina; the Atlanta
    Radio Club Scholarship was awarded to Emily Wilbourn, KM4JXB, of
    Buford, Georgia; the Cordel Scholarship was awarded to Collin Pike,
    KJ4AXB, of Roanoke, Alabama, and the Winscot Scholarship was awarded to
    Anna Grogen Pike, KD4PCU, of Roanoke, Alabama.

    More than 50 Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES^(R)) and Auxiliary
    Communication Service (ACS) volunteers supported the MCAS Miramar Air
    Show. They donated some 500 hours of their time to support public
    safety at the largest show of its type in the US over the September 27
    - 29 weekend in San Diego, California. Miramar served as the shooting
    location for the 1986 film Top Gun. Performances by the US Navy Blue
    Angels and the British Royal Air Force Red Arrows drew large crowds
    that strained anxious public safety services at the annual event.
    Working daily 12-hour shifts, ARES operators continuously patrolled the
    crowds looking for air show guests in distress with heat exhaustion or
    lost family members, while ACS hams liaised with law enforcement
    agencies and kept information flowing between agencies. High noise
    levels from low-flying aircraft were challenging. During a barbecue
    break, volunteers compared notes about whose noise-cancelling
    headphones worked best, as well as how to secure the transceiver
    connections and to avoid open mics. -- Thanks to Dave Kaltenborn,
    N8KBC, via The ARRL ARES E-Letter

    Louisiana and Mississippi amateur radio volunteers supported the "Bike
    MS: Dat's How We Roll" Event. Over the October 5 - 6 weekend, 32
    amateur radio volunteers from the Southeast Louisiana Amateur Radio
    Club (SELARC), the Southwest Mississippi Amateur Radio Club (SMARC),
    and Southeast Louisiana ARES supported the "Bike MS: Dat's How We Roll"
    event. The tour provided 267 volunteer hours in support of the annual
    multiple sclerosis bike ride from Hammond, Louisiana, to Percy Quin
    Park, Mississippi, and back. The hams used the SELARC VHF repeater and
    the LWARN UHF repeater system to provide communication for safety,
    logistics, and medical teams along the route on the back-country roads
    of Louisiana and Mississippi. Event sponsors, staffers, and friends and
    families of the cyclists as well as the cyclists themselves expressed
    their appreciation for the work of the ham radio volunteers and were
    impressed with the capabilities of amateur radio, Communications
    Coordinator Bob Priez, WB5FBS, said.

    [IMG]The Yasme Foundation Board of Directors has approved a supporting
    grant of $4,000 to Club Log and Club Log Author Michael Wells, G7VJR.
    The grant will support capital improvements, needed to take the system
    into the future with improved resiliency, enhanced performance, and the
    hardware needed for continued innovation, such as an interface to other
    online services like CloudLog. Club Log caters to DXers and DXpedition
    hosting. Yasme's association with Club Log began with a grant in 2012,
    when the system hosted 67 million contacts with 7,300 users. Today,
    Club Log boasts some 70,000 active users and some 590 million contacts.
    The Yasme Foundation is a not-for-profit corporation organized to
    support scientific and educational projects related to amateur radio,
    including DXing and the introduction and promotion of amateur radio in
    developing countries.

    Eric Tichansky, NO3M, and Roger Crofts, VK4YB, are claiming a new world
    distance record on 630 meters. They worked each other on October 14 at
    1032 UTC using JT9 mode. Tichansky said the contact represented the
    culmination of 2 years of effort around every equinox since September
    2017. "Hopes were wearing thin as we were moving away from the recent
    equinox on September 23," he said. "Even when the path may have been
    open over the past 3 weeks, either end would be plagued with QRN." He
    said that while the opening that facilitated the record-breaking
    contact was not comparably as strong as past openings, "something
    special was obviously at play." The contact covered 9,307.5 miles
    (14,979 kilometers), topping the previous record of 8,351.9 miles set
    by Roger Crofts, VK4YB, and Kenneth Roberson, K5DNL, by nearly 1,000
    miles. Tichansky said his transmit antenna is a 67-foot top-loaded
    vertical, and the receive antenna is a full-sized eight-circle array
    comprised of short verticals. The transmit/receive at VK4YB is a
    linear-loaded vertical. -- Thanks to Eric Tichansky, NO3M

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * November 2 - 3 -- Georgia State Convention, Lawrenceville, Georgia
    * November 16 -- Indiana Section Convention, Fort Wayne, Indiana
    * December 13 - 14 -- West Central Florida Section Convention, Plant
    City, Florida
    * January 4 -- New York City-Long Island Section Convention,
    Brookville, New York
    * January 17 - 18 -- North Texas Section Convention, Forest Hill,
    Texas
    * January 19 - 25 -- Quartzfest, Quartzsite, Arizona
    * January 24 - 26 -- Puerto Rico State Convention, Hatillo, Puerto
    Rico
    * January 25 -- ARRL Midwest Conference (Winterfest), Collinsville,
    Illinois

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

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    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Nov 8 09:05:02 2019
    The ARRL Letter
    November 7, 2019

    * IARU Reports Early Progress, Contention on Difficult Issues Mark
    First Week of WRC-19
    * Pitcairn Island DXpedition Logs More Than 80,000 Contacts
    * MARSRADIO is Keeping the Phone Patch Alive
    * The Doctor Will See You Now!
    * W1AW to Commemorate 98th Anniversary of First Amateur Radio Signals
    to Span the Atlantic
    * SKYWARN Recognition Day Celebrates 20 Years on December 7
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * Preparations Resume for 3Y0I Bouvet Island DXpedition
    * France Gives its Highest Honor to The Secret Wireless War Author
    Geoffrey Pidgeon
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    IARU Reports Early Progress, Contention on Difficult Issues Mark First
    Week of WRC-19

    The first week of World Radiocommunication Conference 2019 (WRC-19) saw
    agreement reached on several issues on which discussions prior to the
    conference had revealed consensus. Those were the easy ones; the rest
    will be more difficult, the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU)
    said. The conference is in its second week in Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt.
    The IARU said the early agreements were only possible because of
    countless hours of work conducted within the ITU Radiocommunication
    Sector and the six regional telecommunications organizations (RTOs)
    since WRC-15. Three of those decisions were on issues of interest to
    the IARU.
    * The band 47.0 - 47.2 GHz was allocated solely to the Amateur and
    Amateur Satellite Services by the 1979 World ministrative Radio
    Conference (WARC-79). Commercial wireless broadband interests had
    expressed some interest in the band being designated for
    International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT), and there was some
    concern that such a proposal might be made at WRC-19. The fact that
    none was forthcoming was due in part to the work of the IARU at the
    Conference Preparatory Meeting earlier this year and in the RTOs.
    The WRC has agreed to "no change" (NOC) at 47.0 - 47.2 GHz.
    * Another NOC decision that avoided impact on the Amateur Service
    applies to the band 5850 - 5925 MHz, an amateur secondary
    allocation in Region 2. Consideration of proposals involving other
    parts of spectrum in the 5 GHz range will take much longer,
    according to the IARU.
    * Consideration of a 50 MHz allocation in ITU Region 1 (Europe,
    Africa, and the Mideast) to harmonize the allocations in the three
    regions was the subject of spirited debate in a Sub Working Group
    chaired by Dale Hughes, VK1DSH, of the Australian delegation. The
    four RTOs in Region 1 made disparate proposals to the conference,
    and a small group of administrations proposed no change. For 3
    days, there was no progress toward a consensus solution, but that
    changed on Friday morning. An agreement was made, subject to
    confirmation by the regional groups, that will provide
    administrations in Region 1 with flexibility in how to accommodate
    their radio amateurs.

    The WRC agreed to make no frequency allocations or other changes to the
    Radio Regulations to accommodate wireless power transmission for
    electric vehicles (WPT-EV). "Much more work remains to be done on an
    urgent basis in the ITU and other standards organizations if

    IARU President Tim Ellam,
    VE6SH (right), chats with
    IARU Secretary David Sumner,
    K1ZZ, on the way to a WRC-19
    session. [Jon Siverling,
    WB3ERA, photo]

    radiocommunication services are to be adequately protected from harmful
    interference that may be generated by WPT-EV, both at the fundamental
    frequency and from unwanted emissions," the IARU said.

    One of the most difficult issues facing WRC-19 is to develop an agenda
    for WRC-23. Dozens of proposals for agenda items have been suggested,
    and they cannot all be accommodated within available ITU resources.

    Delegates have been warned to expect more intensive use of weekend and
    evening hours as the conference proceeds toward its conclusion on
    November 22. -- Thanks to the IARU
    Pitcairn Island DXpedition Logs More Than 80,000 Contacts

    The VP6R DXpedition to Pitcairn Island shut down at 1800 UTC on
    November 1, reporting 82,700 contacts. They reported excellent weather
    for the teardown and got everything packed and aboard the Braveheart,
    which is taking them to Mangareva. According to their update, the
    oldest resident of Pitcairn Island died on November 1, and the VP6R
    team attended the funeral the next day. The individual was buried next
    to Tom Christian, VP6TC, who gave many radio amateurs their first
    Pitcairn contacts.

    During their stay on the island, VP6R team members helped two local
    radio amateurs to get on the air -- Meralda Warren, VP6MW, and Mike
    Warren, VP6AZ.

    The entire VP6R log will be posted to Logbook of The World (LoTW), and
    stations may QSL via K9CT.

    "On behalf of the team, our off-island support members, and our
    sponsors, may I say thank you to our DX audience for your interest,
    support, and of course, the QSOs," Ralph Fedor, K0IR, said. "To the
    kids at the Dorothy Grant Elementary School, thank you for taking part
    in this great adventure with us through ham radio. You brightened our
    path."

    The DXpedition reported high spirits, big pileups, and good
    propagation, giving out "many all-time new ones" during its stay. "We
    had fun with this," Fedor said. "We hope you did too."

    VP6R operated from two sites on the island. During their stay, the team
    took part in the CQ World Wide DX Contest (SSB). A DXpedition veteran,
    Fedor had to pull out of the Pitcairn Island trip due to health issues,
    but maintained a support role.

    MARSRADIO is Keeping the Phone Patch Alive

    A military plane over the North Atlantic suddenly experiences rapid
    decompression. A call goes out to MARSRADIO, explaining the emergency
    and requesting a phone patch to the aircraft's command post. Over the
    next few hours, a MARSRADIO volunteer handles many phone patches to
    help resolve the situation. An adjunct within the Air Force Military
    Auxiliary Radio System (MARS), MARSRADIO is reminiscent of an era when
    MARS facilitated hundreds of troop morale phone patches each night
    between soldiers deployed in Vietnam and their families and loved ones
    back home.

    Today, MARS is more oriented to official Department of Defense (DoD)
    communication, but the venerable phone patch remains viable within
    MARSRADIO, a special MARS operations group that provides primary
    service and a backup system that handles requests for official and
    morale phone patches, weather forecasts, informal messages, selective
    calling tests, and radio checks. Membership in MARSRADIO is open to
    both Army and Air Force MARS members, and it is seeking additional
    volunteers.

    MARSRADIO members have advanced station capabilities, put in many hours
    of participation, and operate under more stringent requirements than
    the standard MARS program does. These include the ability to monitor
    two frequencies simultaneously; an amplifier; a directional antenna
    (i.e., Yagi) for operation above 13 MHz; dipoles for use below 13 MHz;
    internet access; at least 36 hours of participation per quarter, and no
    digital requirement, if MARSRADIO is the station's primary assignment.

    "MARSRADIO" is the net call sign for the 11th Air Force MARS MARSRADIO
    Squadron (11AFMS) under the 1st AFMARS Special Operations Group
    (1AFMSOG). MARSRADIO net members guard frequencies as much as possible,
    and the net is authorized 24/7/365. MARSRADIO serves as a backup to US
    Defense Department communication, including the US Air Force Global
    System, handling an average of 2,500 requests each year for assistance
    -- from providing estimated times of arrival to communications
    involving medical or mechanical emergencies.

    MARSRADIO has evolved into a DoD asset that's noteworthy for its
    volunteer support, and interest is rising as HF regains importance.
    Volunteers handle communication for all branches of the military and
    for other US government users. All types of DoD aircraft and ground
    units may request support to complete their missions, and the net is
    open to US allies.

    MARSRADIO is not for every ham or every MARS member, but those
    interested in service would be working with real-time traffic on a
    daily basis. A fast-track program is in place to bring well-qualified
    operators directly into MARSRADIO. While today's MARS is highly digital
    and encrypted, the phone patch is a totally different animal. Members
    of MARSRADIO do not need digital capability. They don't even need a
    landline. A Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) connection via the
    internet will provide the phone line needed to run a patch.

    More information on MARSRADIO is available.
    The Doctor Will See You Now!

    "Antenna Switches" is the topic of the new (November 7) episode of the
    ARRL The Doctor is In podcast. Listen...and learn!

    Sponsored by DX Engineering, ARRL The Doctor is In is an informative
    discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet, or
    smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like!

    Every 2 weeks, your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve Ford, WB8IMY, and
    the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, will discuss a broad range of
    technical topics. You can also email your questions to doctor@arrl.org,
    and the Doctor may answer them in a future podcast.

    Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone or
    iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can also
    listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration required,
    or browse the site as a guest) and through the free Stitcher app for
    iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never listened to a podcast
    before, download our beginner's guide.

    W1AW to Commemorate 98th Anniversary of First Amateur Radio Signals to
    Span the Atlantic

    December 11 marks the 98th anniversary of the success of ARRL's
    Transatlantic Tests in 1921, organized to see if low-power amateur
    radio stations could be heard across the Atlantic using shortwave
    frequencies (i.e., above 200 meters). On that day, a message
    transmitted by a group of Radio Club of America members at 1BCG in
    Greenwich, Connecticut, was copied by Paul Godley, 2ZE, in Scotland.

    While the first two-way contact would not take place until 1923, the
    1921 transatlantic success marked the beginning of what would become
    routine communication between US radio amateurs and those in other
    parts of the world -- the birth of DX.

    To commemorate this amateur radio milestone, Maxim Memorial Station
    W1AW will be on the air through the day on December 11 with volunteer
    operators. The goal is to encourage contacts between radio amateurs in
    the US and Europe while showcasing the significance of the
    transmissions that pioneered global communication and laid the
    groundwork for technology widely used today.

    The event will run from 1300 until 0000 UTC. Some details are still
    being worked out, but operation will focus on 40 and 20 meters (SSB).

    Contact Clark Burgard, N1BCG, for more information.
    SKYWARN Recognition Day Celebrates 20 Years on December 7

    SKYWARN Recognition Day (SRD) will mark its 20th anniversary on
    December 7, 0000 to 2400 UTC. This is the day each year when radio
    amateurs operate from National Weather Service (NWS) forecast offices
    across the country, celebrating the long relationship between the
    amateur radio community and the National Weather Service SKYWARN
    program. The purpose of the event is to recognize amateur radio
    operators for the vital public service they perform during times of
    severe weather and to strengthen the bond between radio amateurs and
    their local NWS offices.

    Developed in 1999, SRD is cosponsored by ARRL and the NWS.
    Traditionally, radio amateurs have assisted the mission of the NWS
    through providing near real-time reports of severe weather and storm
    development. Reports received from radio amateurs have proven
    invaluable to NWS forecasters.

    During SRD, participants exchange contact information with as many NWS
    stations as possible on 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6, and 2 meters, plus 70
    centimeters. Contacts via repeaters are permitted. Stations should
    exchange call signs, signal reports, and locations, plus a quick
    description of the weather at your location (e.g., sunny, partly
    cloudy, windy, rainy, etc.). EchoLink and IRLP nodes, including the
    Voice over Internet Protocol Weather Net (VoIP-WX), are expected to be
    active as well.

    WX4NHC at the National Hurricane Center will also be on the air for
    SRD, 1300 - 1700 UTC, for its 21st year of SRD participation.

    Event certificates are electronic and printable from the main website
    at the conclusion of SRD. To learn more, visit the SKYWARN Recognition
    Day website.

    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: Two new sunspot groups appeared this
    week on two consecutive days, each lasting for only a day, with a daily
    sunspot number of 11 and 13 last Friday and Saturday, just in time for
    the ARRL November Sweepstakes CW weekend. Both sunspot groups had a
    magnetic polarity signature indicating Solar Cycle 25 and appeared
    after 4 weeks of no sunspots.

    [IMG]Spaceweather.com reported both appearances as region AR2750, while
    NOAA reported a new sunspot group on each day.

    Solar flux was higher over the October 31 - November 6 reporting week,
    with average daily solar flux rising from 68.5 to 70.4. Geomagnetic
    indicators were low, with average daily planetary A index declining
    from 16.4 to 4.1, and average mid-latitude A index softening from 13 to
    2.7.

    Predicted solar flux is 70 on November 7; 68 on November 8 - 14; 67 on
    November 15 - 19; 68 and 70 on November 20 - 21; 71 on November 22 -
    30; 70 on December 1 - 6; 69 on December 7 - 19, and 70 on December 20
    - 21.

    Predicted planetary A index is 8 on November 7; 5 on November 8 - 10; 8
    on November 11 - 12; 5 on November 13 - 19; 15, 25, 18, 12, and 10 on
    November 20 - 24; 8 on November 25 - 26; 5 on November 27 - December
    16, and 15, 20, 18, 12, and 12 on December 17 - 21.

    Even during days with no sunspots, there was notable HF propagation
    recently, with the just-ended VP6R Pitcairn Island DXpedition making HF
    contacts across the Americas, even on 10 meters.

    Sunspot numbers for October 31 - November 6 were 0, 11, 13, 0, 0, 0,
    and 0, with a mean of 3.4. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 71.2, 70.7,
    70.7, 69.4, 70.8, 70.4, and 69.3, with a mean of 70.4. Estimated
    planetary A indices were 7, 4, 2, 2, 4, 5, and 5, with a mean of 4.1.
    The middle latitude A index was 5, 2, 1, 1, 4, 2, and 4, with a mean of
    2.7.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * November 9 - 10 -- WAE DX Contest RTTY
    * November 9 - 10 -- 10-10 International Fall Contest (Digital)
    * November 9 - 10 -- JIDX Phone Contest
    * November 9 - 10 -- SARL VHF/UHF Analogue Contest (CW, phone)
    * November 9 - 10 -- OK/OM DX Contest (CW)
    * November 9 - 10 -- SKCC Weekend Sprintathon (CW)
    * November 9 - 11 -- CQ-WE Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * November 9 - 11 -- PODXS 070 Club Triple Play Low Band Sprint
    (Digital)
    * November 9 - 17 -- AWA Bruce Kelley 1929 QSO Party (CW)
    * November 10 -- North American SSB Sprint Contest
    * November 11 -- 4 States QRP Group Second Sunday Sprint (CW, phone)
    * November 11 -- RSGB 80-Meter Autumn Series (Digital)
    * November 15 -- YO International PSK31 Contest

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on amateur radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.

    Preparations Resume for 3Y0I Bouvet Island DXpedition

    Another attempt to activate Bouvet Island is in the planning stages,
    according to the 3Y0I website. Efforts are under way to secure the
    necessary funds.

    "As you probably know, our first attempt to reach the island of Bouvet
    in March 2019 failed," the news update said. "Despite complex
    preparations and training received in Cape Town, South Africa, our
    vessel got hit by a big storm so badly that we had no choice but to
    sail back to Cape Town to reshuffle our plans. We were so close -- just
    63 nautical miles offshore!" The 3Y0I sponsors estimate that a second
    attempt would cost around $170,000. "[W]e have already secured half of
    the required budget to go back to Bouvet," the announcement said,
    adding that it's beyond the capacity of the DXpedition team members to
    cover the entire cost, so they are trying to collect $85,000 to fund
    the second attempt.

    The 3Y0I team has a GoFundMe page, set up by 3Y0I team leader Dom
    Grzyb, 3Z9DX. No time frame was given for the second attempt by Grzyb's
    team, and it's not known if Grzyb has obtained operating permission
    from the Norwegian government. The 19-square-mile subantarctic island
    is a Norwegian dependency.

    "Our intentions are clear: If we don't reach our fundraising goal, we
    won't receive nor spend a single cent you donate and it would be
    returned to your GoFundMe account for withdrawal, or to support any
    other GoFundMe project of your choice," the announcement says.

    "The future of amateur radio expeditions, especially in terms of
    activating entities placed across cold high-latitude seas, isn't
    bright," the 3Y0I statement says. "Apart from the uncertainty of future
    solar cycles' strength that may badly reflect radio propagations, there
    are still very few of us who realize that visiting remote cold islands
    may become very seldom or even almost impossible."

    According to Club Log's DXCC Most Wanted List, Bouvet Island is number
    2, right behind North Korea. The unrelated 3Y0Z DXpedition attempt to
    land on Bouvet in early 2018 failed after the vessel transporting the
    team developed engine issues as it lay just offshore. The last
    successful Bouvet activation was 3Y0E, during a scientific expedition
    over the winter of 2007 - 2008. -- Thanks to Southgate Amateur Radio
    News via OPDX
    France Gives its Highest Honor to The Secret Wireless War Author
    Geoffrey Pidgeon

    The author of The Secret Wireless War, Geoffrey Pidgeon, recently
    became the 6,000th veteran to receive the French Legion of Honor
    (Legion d'Honneur). Through his undercover work in British
    intelligence, Pidgeon, now 93, played a pivotal role in the D-Day
    landings. His book, which recounts the important role of the

    Geoffrey Pidgeon. [Forces TV]

    Communications Division of Britain's Secret Intelligence Service (SIS)
    during World War II, has long been a favorite among hams.

    "There never was, in the whole history of wireless, a bigger role for
    the amateur wireless enthusiast," says Pidgeon. "This is an
    extraordinary story that includes hams among those patriots that
    undoubtedly helped the Allied war effort."

    Pidgeon said he was "somewhat overwhelmed" by the turnout for the award
    presentation by French Ambassador to the UK Catherine Colonna. UK
    Defence Secretary Ben Wallace also attended. The event attracted news
    media as well. Reports included one from Forces TV. Pidgeon also was
    interviewed by London's The Sunday Times.

    "They made a fuss of me today," Pidgeon told Forces TV.

    The Secret Wireless War offers a history of the SIS, its growing use of
    wireless in the 1930s, its involvement in the dissemination by wireless
    of Enigma (Ultra) intelligence, and a whole range of secret uses of
    wireless as part of the successful prosecution of the war.

    The book documents the personal tales of those who were part of this
    most secret of units, and events that helped to win the war: Secret
    agents abroad, wireless operators handling Ultra and agents' traffic,
    wireless engineers, interceptors, and administrators; the story of
    Churchill's personal wireless operator; a fleet of 70+ Packard motor
    cars and converted Dodge ambulances used as mobile wireless stations;
    and hams listening to the German secret service and the Gestapo.

    Pidgeon's memoir of his days in MI6 Communications during World War II
    is distributed in the US by ARRL.
    In Brief...

    The American Legion Amateur Radio Club (TALARC) will operate special
    event station N9V on Veterans Day, November 11. The club's headquarters
    station, K9TAL, will anchor the N9V Veterans Day operations, joined by
    several TALARC stations around the US, for its annual national salute
    to veterans. The American Legion is celebrating its 100th anniversary
    this year. Operation will be from 1800 to 0000 UTC on or about 7.285,
    14.285, and 21.285 MHz. Certificates will be available to all sending a
    QSL card. More information is on the N9V profile page on QRZ.com. --
    Thanks to Jim Harris, W0EM, and The National Legion Amateur Radio Club

    University of Washington
    doctoral candidate Paige
    Northway with a HuskySat
    engineering model.
    [Courtesy of UW News]

    A Cygnus cargo spacecraft carrying the University of Washington's
    student-built HuskySat-1 CubeSat has been successfully launched. The
    Cygnus docked with the International Space Station (ISS) on November 4.
    It then is scheduled to depart the ISS on January 13, 2020, and raise
    its orbit to approximately 500 kilometers (310 miles), where HuskySat-1
    and SwampSat will be deployed. After deployment, HuskySat-1's 1,200 bps
    BPSK beacon on 435.800 MHz should be active and decodable with the
    latest release of FoxTelem. HuskySat-1 is expected to run its primary
    mission for 30 days -- testing a pulsed plasma thruster and
    experimental 24 GHz data transmitter -- before being turned over to
    AMSAT for amateur radio operation. HuskySat-1 features a 30 kHz wide
    145 to 435 MHz linear transponder for SSB/CW. "Usually people buy most
    of the satellite and build one part of it," said Paige Northway, a
    doctoral student who's been involved with the project since inception.
    "We built all the parts. It was a pretty serious undertaking." For more
    information about HuskySat-1's development and its science, read the UW
    News article, "Washington's first student-built satellite preparing for
    launch." -- Thanks to AMSAT News Service via SpaceNews.com; Paul
    Stoetzer, N8HM, and UW News

    The FCC is looking for a telecommunications specialist to work at the
    HF Direction Finding Center in Columbia, Maryland. This is a full-time
    position with a competitive salary. The incumbent would perform "watch
    duty" and serve as a technical authority, providing technical
    assistance and guidance to communication systems users to resolve radio
    interference complaints and problems. The telecommunications specialist
    collects radio signal analysis information using equipment deployed
    throughout the US to collect, correlate, and analyze characteristics of
    radio signals involved in interference problems, distress, or
    safety-related signals, or other radio signals involved in other
    high-priority activities, such as law enforcement or national defense.
    This individual analyzes complaints, inquiries, and comments from
    multiple sources; investigates compliances with FCC rules and
    regulations, and determines appropriate actions, utilizing the FCC's
    remote HF network of radio direction finders and radio signal analysis
    equipment. For additional information, see the full job description.

    The FCC has solicited comments on a Petition for Declaratory Ruling
    clarifying Amateur Service rules governing encrypted or encoded
    messages. Filed on behalf of New York University (NYU), the Petition
    seeks to clarify that Section 97.113(a)(4) of the Amateur Service rules
    prohibits the transmission of "effectively encrypted or encoded
    messages, including messages that cannot be readily decoded
    over-the-air for true meaning." Comments are due by December 2, with
    reply comments (comments on comments already filed) due on December 17.
    The FCC has requested that all filings refer to WT Docket No. 16-239,
    which grew out of an ARRL Petition for Rule Making requesting
    elimination of symbol rate limitations on the amateur bands and is
    unrelated to the wider encryption issue. The NYU Petition contends that
    some communication modes incorporating dynamic compression techniques
    "by extension, effectively encrypt or encode the communications."

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * November 16 -- Indiana Section Convention, Fort Wayne, Indiana
    * December 13 - 14 -- West Central Florida Section Convention, Plant
    City, Florida
    * January 4 -- New York City-Long Island Section Convention,
    Brookville, New York
    * January 17 - 18 -- North Texas Section Convention, Forest Hill,
    Texas
    * January 19 - 25 -- Quartzfest, Quartzsite, Arizona
    * January 24 - 26 -- Puerto Rico State Convention, Hatillo, Puerto
    Rico
    * January 25 -- ARRL Midwest Conference (Winterfest), Collinsville,
    Illinois

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
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    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Nov 15 09:05:02 2019
    The ARRL Letter
    November 14, 2019

    * HamSCI Founder Nathaniel Frissell, W2NAF, Wins $1.3 Million
    Ionosphere Study Grant
    * World Radiocommunication Conference 2019 Enters Its Third Week
    * RF-Seismograph Gets Traction in Hackaday
    * So Now What? Podcast
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * More Than 1 Million Contacts Logged During 2019 ARRL Field Day
    * AMSAT Says HuskySat-1 is Paving the Way for Further Cooperation
    * IARU and Amateur Radio Are Reaching "An Inflection Point"
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    HamSCI Founder Nathaniel Frissell, W2NAF, Wins $1.3 Million Ionosphere
    Study Grant

    Nathaniel Frissell, W2NAF, now a University of Scranton physics and
    electrical engineering professor, has won a $1.3 million National
    Science Foundation (NSF) grant to study weather effects in the
    ionosphere by leveraging a network of amateur radio stations. Frissell
    is perhaps best known within the amateur radio community as the founder
    of HamSCI, the Ham Radio Science Citizen Investigation initiative. The
    Distributed Arrays of Small Instruments (DASI) project will be
    implemented over 3 years. As principal investigator, Frissell -- a
    space physicist -- will head a collaborative team that will develop
    ground-based space science observation instruments and software. His
    research effort will recruit multiple universities and radio amateurs
    to operate a network of personal space weather stations.

    "I'm very excited," Frissell told ARRL. "This grant is extremely
    exciting for both ham radio and ionospheric research. Perhaps more than
    the money, it means that the NSF is recognizing the good work that we,
    as hams, are doing and the contribution we can make in the future."

    Frissell said the grant demonstrates that the scientific community is
    taking amateur radio seriously. "This is great for ham radio, as it
    provides yet another avenue for us to contribute to the art and science
    of radio in a meaningful way," he said.

    The space weather equipment will be developed at two levels of
    sophistication -- one at a low-cost, easy-to-use level for radio
    amateurs, and another, more complex version for university partners
    that will allow the collection of additional data.

    "The equipment and network allows us to measure and characterize
    ionospheric and geomagnetic short-term, small-scale variability on a
    large geographic scale in order to understand the response of the
    ionosphere to sources from above (space weather) and below (atmospheric
    forcing)," Frissell explained in his grant proposal. "By designing
    personal space weather station variants at multiple price points, open
    sourcing the hardware and software, and directly engaging with the ham
    radio community, this project maximizes the chances of widespread
    adoption of this system." Frissell intends to focus his recruitment
    efforts through HamSCI and TAPR. Read more.
    World Radiocommunication Conference 2019 Enters Its Third Week

    Intense discussions of the most contentious agenda items marked the
    second week of World Radiocommunication Conference 2019 (WRC-19), but
    very little was resolved.

    "It is clear that long days and nights are ahead in the last 2 weeks,"
    International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) Secretary David Sumner, K1ZZ,
    observed earlier this week. Representatives of the IARU and its
    member-societies -- 14 in all -- are attending all or part of the
    conference. IARU is admitted in a non-advisory capacity. Those
    representing IARU may attend meetings but may not participate unless
    asked by the chairman to provide information. Sumner reported on where
    issues affecting the amateur services stand at the midway point of the
    conference.

    50 MHz in Region 1: While a couple of details remain to be worked out
    as to how other existing services in Region 1 (Europe, Africa, and the
    Middle East) will be protected from interference, there is agreement
    that the amateur service should gain entry at 50 MHz in the
    international Table of Frequency Allocations for Region 1. The present
    6-meter allocations in Regions 2 and 3 will be unchanged. Region 1
    administrations came to the conference holding disparate views on this
    agenda item, ranging from a 4 MHz primary allocation to no allocation
    at all. Sumner said a delicate compromise led to a positive outcome.

    "While it is too early to celebrate, we are cautiously optimistic that
    the compromise will hold," Sumner reported. In a separate report, Radio
    Amateurs of Canada Special visor Bryan Rawlings, VE3QN, said that
    hammering out a 6-meter Region 1 allocation "has been a long and
    frustrating process," and that a 4 MHz primary allocation similar to
    that available in Regions 2 and 3 is an unlikely outcome.

    IARU Secretary David Sumner, K1ZZ
    (left), gives an encouraging thumbs
    up at WRC-19. On the right is IARU
    Region 1 representative Dave Court,
    EI3IO. [Photo courtesy of the Radio
    Society of Great Britain]

    Future Agenda Items: The IARU is not seeking any agenda items for
    future WRCs at this conference. With the spectrum from 8.3 kHz to 275
    GHz fully allocated and some bands above 275 GHz already identified for
    particular uses, any proposal for new allocations involves sharing with
    one or more incumbent services.

    "The pressures for spectrum access to accommodate new uses for
    commercial purposes are intense; for an established service such as
    ours, any WRC that does not reduce our own useful spectrum access is a
    success," Sumner said.

    The notion of including 144 - 146 MHz in a study of non-safety
    aeronautical mobile service applications has not resurfaced at WRC-19.
    The IARU is, however, concerned about a proposed item for WRC-23,
    "Review of the amateur service and the amateur-satellite service
    allocations to ensure the protection of the radionavigation-satellite
    service (space-to-Earth) in the frequency band 1240 - 1300 MHz." A
    single, well-documented and quickly resolved case of interference to a
    Galileo (GPS) receiver 5 years ago prompted the proposed agenda item.

    "The IARU recognizes the concern and does not want the amateur service
    to affect the operation of the Galileo system in any way," Sumner said.
    WRC-19 will conclude on November 22. Read more.

    RF-Seismograph Gets Traction in Hackaday

    Alex Schwarz, VE7DXW, has theorized for some time now that his
    RF-Seismograph, initially aimed at indicating band openings, seemed to
    also act as a real seismograph of sorts, with effects of earthquakes
    affecting HF noise levels and -- going out on a limb -- actually
    briefly enhancing HF propagation (click on image). Schwarz has some
    support from Professor Kosuke Heki of Hokkaido University in Japan, who
    has been researching whether changes occur in the ionosphere as a
    result of an earthquake.

    [IMG]The work of both citizen scientist Schwarz and space geodesy
    expert Heki caught the attention of Hackaday, the online publication
    with a stated goal of promoting "the free and open exchange of ideas
    and information." A November 12 Hackaday article, "HF Propagation and
    Earthquakes," outlines the observations of both men. According to the
    article, Heki "knew that changes in the ionosphere can affect GPS and
    GNSS receivers on the ground, and with Japan's vast network of
    receivers to keep track of the smallest of movements of the Earth's
    crust, he was able to spot an anomalous buildup of electrons directly
    above the devastating 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake that preceded the
    earthquake by 40 minutes."

    Heki's theory is along these lines: Chemical bonds in the rock --
    specifically peroxy bonds between two oxygen atoms -- are broken by
    microfractures, leaving one side of the peroxy bond with excess
    electrons and the other with a positive hole. "These holes tend to
    migrate from high stress to unstressed areas of the rock, which leads
    them to eventually reach the surface, leaving it with a net positive
    charge," the Hackaday piece says. "As stress in the rock below
    increases, the number of positive holes reaching the surface rapidly
    multiplies, drawing electrons from the atmosphere to balance the
    charge. The moving charges generate an enormous electromagnetic field
    that can reach all the way up to the ionosphere, creating just the kind
    of anomalies that Professor Heki observed."

    Alex Schwarz, VE7DXW, spoke at
    the 2015 ARRL-TAPR Digital
    Communications Conference.
    [Photo courtesy of
    HamRadioNow]

    This week, Schwarz reported that the US Geological Survey recorded nine
    "significant earthquakes" on November 11, eight of which also were
    recorded by his RF-Seismograph. According to Schwarz, several small
    quakes early in the morning "opened the 40-meter band slightly, but the
    precursor of the quake [in Neiafu, Tonga] created a disturbance
    starting 4 hours prior to the quake and a total radio blackout between
    0330 UTC and 0550 UTC. The quakes in late morning did not have a great
    effect on the local propagation. The one from Vanuatu created 80-meter
    propagation for 10 minutes only. At 2340 UTC, another quake from
    Indonesia opened the 30-meter band again," Schwarz said.

    The Hackaday article concludes, "Clearly, the RF-Seismograph is not yet
    ready to claim to have a solid predictive ability for earthquakes. For
    that matter, Dr. Heki's space-based observations aren't ready to stake
    that claim either. But it certainly looks like ionospheric changes can
    be correlated to earthquakes, both in time and space..."
    So Now What? Podcast

    "Navigating the Nets," with guest Steve Ewald, WV1X, ARRL Field
    Services Supervisor, will be the focus of the new (November 14) episode
    of the So Now What? podcast for amateur radio newcomers.

    If you're a newly licensed amateur radio operator, chances are you have
    lots of questions. This biweekly podcast has answers! So Now What?
    offers insights from those who've been just where you are now. New
    episodes will be posted every other Thursday, alternating new-episode
    weeks with the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast.

    So Now What? is sponsored by LDG Electronics, a family owned and
    operated business with laboratories in southern Maryland that offers a
    wide array of antenna tuners and other amateur radio products.

    ARRL Communications Content Producer Michelle Patnode, W3MVP, and ARRL
    Station Manager Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, co-host the podcast. Presented as a
    lively conversation, with Patnode representing newer hams and Carcia
    the veteran operators, the podcast will explore questions that newer
    hams may have and the issues that keep participants from staying active
    in the hobby. Some episodes will feature guests to answer questions on
    specific topic areas.

    Listeners can find So Now What? on Apple iTunes, Blubrry, Stitcher
    (free registration required, or browse the site as a guest) and through
    the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. Episodes
    will be archived on the ARRL website.

    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: With little to no solar activity,
    it's amazing how many HF DX contacts are possible, even without taking
    advantage of so-called weak-signal modes such as FT8. Recent
    DXpeditions, such as the ones on Pitcairn Island and the Marquesas, had
    little trouble piling up the contacts, even on 10 meters. It helps that
    fall is upon us.

    No sunspots over the past week, and average daily solar flux was about
    the same as last week, 70.3 compared to 70.4. Geomagnetic indices were
    still quiet, with average daily planetary A index at 4 (last week was
    4.1) and middle latitude A index at 3 (compared to 2.7).

    Predicted solar flux is 71 on November 14 - December 3; 70 on December
    4 - 18; and 71 on December 19 - 28.

    Predicted planetary A index is 5 on November 14 - 15; 12 and 8 on
    November 16 - 17; 5 on November 18 - 19; 18, 25, 18, 12, and 10 on
    November 20 - 24; 8 on November 25 - 26; 5 on November 27 - December
    16; 15, 25, 18, 12, and 10 on December 17 - 21; 8 on December 22 - 23,
    and 5 on December 24 - 28.

    Sunspot numbers for November 7 - 13 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0, with
    a mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 69.8, 70.2, 69.6, 70.8, 69.5,
    70.8, and 71.1, with a mean of 70.4. Estimated planetary A indices were
    5, 3, 4, 3, 7, 4, and 2, with a mean of 4.1. Middle latitude A index
    was 3, 2, 3, 2, 7, 3, and 1, with a mean of 2.7.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * November 15 -- YO International PSK31 Contest
    * November 16 -- Feld Hell Sprint
    * November 16 -- All Austrian 160-Meter Contest (CW)
    * November 16 -- RSGB 1.8 MHz Contest (CW)
    * November 16 - 17 -- REF 160-Meter Contest (CW)
    * November 16 - 17 -- ARRL EME Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * November 16 - 17 -- LZ DX Contest (CW, phone)
    * November 16 - 18 -- ARRL November Sweepstakes (Phone)
    * November 17 -- Homebrew and Oldtime Equipment Party (CW)
    * November 18 -- Run for the Bacon QRP Contest (CW)
    * November 19 -- NAQCC CW Sprint
    * November 20 -- RSGB 80-Meter Autumn Series (Phone)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on amateur radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.

    More Than 1 Million Contacts Logged During 2019 ARRL Field Day

    ARRL Contest Program Manager Paul Bourque, N1SFE, reports that nearly
    1.1 million contacts were made during the 2019 ARRL Field Day -- the
    most popular operating event in North America. Bourque reported the
    2019 ARRL Field Day results, which are available starting on page 64 of
    the digital edition of the December 2019 issue of QST. Bourque says in
    his article that more than 36,000 radio amateurs took part in 2019
    Field Day across all 83 ARRL/Radio Amateurs of Canada Sections, up
    slightly from the 35,250 reported last year. The total number of
    contacts was down by about 7% from 2018's 1.18 million contacts.

    The Williamsburg Area Amateur
    Radio Club (WAARC) operated Field
    Day 2019 from Virginia using the
    club's call sign K4RC. GOTA
    Station operator Solana Stevenson
    beams, with her mother Mari Ann
    Stevenson in back at the left and
    grandfather Randy Altona, KM4YSN,
    in back at the right, with GOTA
    Coach Chuck White, AI4WU. [Dan
    Ewart, WG4F, photo]

    "This year, 3,113 entries were received from local clubs and emergency
    operations centers (EOCs), as well as individual portable, mobile, and
    home stations," Bourque wrote in QST. Most entries were in Class A --
    club or non-club groups of three or more.

    Of the nearly 1.1 million contacts, approximately 46% were made on
    phone, and 456,000 (42%) of contacts were made on CW. The remaining
    138,000+ (12%) of the contacts were made on digital modes, such as FT8
    and RTTY.

    "This is a substantial increase compared to 2018, when total QSOs on
    the digital modes numbered just over 56,000," Bourque reported. "With
    the late 2018 release of WSJT-X (which now supports Field Day
    exchanges), many participants made use of FT8's ability to communicate
    when band conditions weren't being cooperative."

    Top 10 scores ranged between W3AO's Class 14A entry from Maryland-DC,
    with 32,356 points, to W1NVT's 14,876-point Class 2A entry from
    Vermont.

    Bourque said that 95% of the 3,113 entries received came through the
    Field Day web applet.

    "Not only is ARRL Field Day an opportunity to sharpen operating skills
    in temporary and portable locations, it's also an occasion to showcase
    amateur radio to the local community," Bourque wrote.

    Soapbox comments for Field Day 2019 are available on the ARRL website.
    ARRL Field Day 2020 will take place June 27 - 28.
    AMSAT Says HuskySat-1 is Paving the Way for Further Cooperation

    AMSAT says it had to maneuver some regulatory challenges in
    establishing its partnership with the University of Washington to share
    the just-launched HuskySat-1. The satellite went into space on November
    2 aboard a Cygnus cargo vessel, which docked to the International Space
    Station. HuskySat-1 will be boosted into a higher orbit and deployed in
    January, and once it completes its primary mission, it will be turned
    over to AMSAT for operation of its linear transponder sometime in the
    second quarter of 2020. AMSAT Vice President-Engineering Jerry Buxton,
    N0JY, explained this week that the AMSAT-UW partnership presented some
    regulatory challenges, but has paved the way for similar partnerships
    in the future.

    "The [FCC] Part 97 license that AMSAT will operate under does not
    include or allow the use of any of the experiments on board," Buxton
    explained. "As those experiments were not able to conform to Part 97's
    so-called 'educational exemption,' including the K-band radio, two
    licenses were required." UW obtained a Part 5 Experimental license to
    cover the telemetry downlink of the AMSAT transponder module, but the
    transponder must remain off during that operation. The AMSAT
    transponder module will operate under an FCC Part 97 Amateur Service
    license.

    "This was the first partnership with an educational institution where
    an AMSAT radio was flown on a non-AMSAT (UW in this case) CubeSat,"
    Buxton said. "In the process of working with the FCC and NASA to obtain
    a single Part 97 license that was not complicated or restricted by
    'pecuniary interest,' the experience developed an understanding with
    FCC as to how a mission such as HuskySat-1 could be fully licensed
    under Part 97."

    AMSAT Vice President-Engineering
    Jerry Buxton, N0JY.

    Buxton said delays and difficulties encountered in executing all of the
    requirements to qualify under Part 97 ultimately bumped up against the
    mission deadline to have a license in hand, so the CubeSat could be
    integrated on the launch vessel. "The only way forward at that time, in
    order for UW to make the launch, was to do the separate licensing,"
    Buxton said.

    "I thank and commend our partners at University of Washington as well
    as the FCC for their work to make it happen, and our friends at NASA
    for giving us the opportunity to push for a path to amateur radio
    licensing for more of the CubeSat launches they sponsor," Buxton
    remarked. "I believe that it has resulted in a known path toward fully
    Part 97-licensed educational (e.g., university) CubeSats. That should
    in turn offer more opportunities for AMSAT radios to fly as the
    communications package for a mission as well as an operating amateur
    radio satellite, in the same way as the CubeSats we produce."

    After deployment, HuskySat-1's 1,200 bps BPSK beacon on 435.800 MHz
    should be active and decodable with the latest release of FoxTelem.
    HuskySat-1 is expected to run its primary mission for 30 days --
    testing a pulsed plasma thruster and experimental 24 GHz data
    transmitter -- before being turned over to AMSAT for amateur radio
    operation. HuskySat-1 will feature a 30 kHz-wide 145-435 MHz linear
    transponder for SSB/CW. -- Thanks to AMSAT News Service

    IARU and Amateur Radio Are Reaching "An Inflection Point"

    Participants at the 45th meeting of the International Amateur Radio
    Union (IARU) ministrative Council (AC) in late September discussed
    the organization's role in advancing amateur radio. The IARU released a
    summary record of the meeting last week. IARU President Tim Ellam,
    VE6SH/G4HUA, who chaired the AC meeting in Lima, Peru, observed that
    the IARU and amateur radio are reaching what he called "an inflection
    point." He asserted that amateur radio is changing, but the IARU and
    its member-societies are not.

    Ellam's remarks prefaced a wide-ranging discussion of the challenges to
    be overcome if the IARU and amateur radio itself are to remain
    relevant. After several hours of discussion, AC participants agreed on
    four top-level headings to identify the challenges that must be faced:
    * What is amateur radio?
    * The roles of IARU and its member-societies
    * Recruitment into amateur radio
    * IARU finances

    The AC also agreed that it is essential to involve younger people from
    outside the Council in determining how to address these challenges, and
    the three IARU regions were asked to identify individuals who "could
    take ownership of these topics."

    A small working group was named, consisting of IARU Region 2 Vice
    President Ram¢n Santoyo, XE1KK; Region 2 Area A Director George
    Gorsline, VE3YV, and IARU Region 1 President Don Beattie, G3BJ. Using
    topics discussed to develop a starting point, the panel will aim to
    have a draft version of a plan by mid-December to address the
    challenges that would serve as a basis for further discussion.

    IARU Region 1 (Europe, Africa, and the Middle East) has been a leader
    in marshalling interest among next-generation radio amateurs,
    sponsoring Youngsters On The Air (YOTA), and other youth-related
    activities, including an annual summer camp attended by young radio
    amateurs from around Region 1. IARU Region 3 noted at the Council
    meeting that it plans a Youth on the Air activity in Thailand next
    October and expressed the hope that Regions 1 and 2 can participate.

    To keep informed on IARU happenings, subscribe to the ARRL-IARU online
    group, moderated by IARU Secretary Dave Sumner, K1ZZ. Read more.
    In Brief...

    There's still time to work TX7T in the Marquesas Islands. The Marquesas
    TX7T DXpedition, sponsored by the CAN-AM DXpedition Group, moved onto
    Hiva Oa on November 6. The team will head home on November 19.
    Typically, three or four stations are on the air on CW, SSB, and FT8 on
    all of the 160 - 10 meter bands. Europe is a key target area, and
    "every attempt will be made to take advantage of propagation," the
    DXpedition has indicated. The DXpedition is mostly funded by the
    operators themselves, but contributions are welcome and will go toward
    freight and shipping costs. The Marquesas Islands rank #59 on the Club
    Log DXCC Most Wanted list. The TX7T logs are available on OQRS.

    A spectrogram
    of the Russian
    "Contayner"
    OTHR. [Image
    courtesy of
    Wolf Hadel,
    DK2OM]

    OTH Radar is now reported to be "everywhere." The latest International
    Amateur Radio Union Region 1 Monitoring System (IARUMS) newsletter
    reports the Russian "Contayner" over-the-horizon radar (OTHR) has been
    active in the 7, 10, 14, and 18 MHz amateur radio allocations (amateur
    radio is primary on 40, 20, and 17 meters). The OTHR transmissions have
    been 40 sweeps/second, FM on pulse, and 12 kHz wide. ditionally,
    IARUMS reports a significant increase in Russian military traffic using
    F1B, PSK, and orthogonal frequency division multiplex (OFDM) on 40, 30,
    20, and 15 meters. IARUMS on November 13 reported an OTHR in northern
    Iran on 6.078 - 7.022 MHz, AM on pulse, 81 sweeps/second, 44 kHz wide.

    Access to 60 meters continues to expand. According to the latest
    edition of The 5 MHz Newsletter, regulatory agencies in an expanding
    list of countries have granted amateur radio access to a 60-meter band.
    A secondary allocation of 5.351.5 - 5.366.5 MHz was released to radio
    amateurs in Kuwait, where they will adhere to the World
    Radiocommunication Conference 2015 (WRC-15) allocation, permitting a
    maximum power of 15 W EIRP. Indonesian and Greek hams recently gained
    access to the same allocation. Meanwhile, Israel has extended
    authorization of 5 MHz amateur permits to the end of December 2023 and
    added a Channel 0 to the existing eight channels, where hams may run
    100 W PEP on several modes, depending upon the channel. Still under
    discussion is ham radio access to a 5 MHz secondary band in Australia,
    where the band is used by some emergency services and law enforcement.
    Nearly 80 countries offer some level of amateur access to the 5 MHz
    band. In the US, ARRL petitioned the FCC shortly after WRC-15 to
    allocate a secondary 60-meter band and to permit 100 W PEP, as already
    authorized on the existing channels there.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * November 16 -- Indiana Section Convention, Fort Wayne, Indiana
    * December 13 - 14 -- West Central Florida Section Convention, Plant
    City, Florida
    * January 4 -- New York City-Long Island Section Convention,
    Brookville, New York
    * January 17 - 18 -- North Texas Section Convention, Forest Hill,
    Texas
    * January 19 - 25 -- Quartzfest, Quartzsite, Arizona
    * January 24 - 26 -- Puerto Rico State Convention, Hatillo, Puerto
    Rico
    * January 25 -- ARRL Midwest Conference (Winterfest), Collinsville,
    Illinois

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
    non-commercial or educational purposes, with attribution. All other
    purposes require written permission.


    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Nov 22 09:05:18 2019
    The ARRL Letter
    November 21, 2019

    * ARRL Legislative vocacy Committee Drafting New Bill dressing
    Antenna Restrictions
    * WRC-19 Delegates Reach Agreement on 6-Meter Band in ITU Region 1
    * Radio Amateur's "Tribute to a Century of Broadcasting" Video Debuts
    on YouTube
    * The Doctor Will See You Now!
    * Melissa Stemmer Joins ARRL Headquarters Staff as Development
    Manager
    * Youth on the Air Camp Coming to the Americas
    * Southern California Hams Support Major Terrorist Attacks Response
    Drill
    * Dayton Hamvention^(R) Invites 2020 Award Nominations
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * Alaska and Tennessee Getting New Section Managers
    * Why Propagation Repeats About Every 27 Days
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL Headquarters will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28 and
    29, for Thanksgiving. The ARRL Letter and ARRL Audio News will not be
    available on those days. The next editions will be on December 5 and 6,
    respectively. We wish everyone a safe and enjoyable Thanksgiving.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL Legislative vocacy Committee Drafting New Bill dressing
    Antenna Restrictions

    The ARRL Board of Directors Legislative vocacy Committee is in the
    process of drafting a new bill to address the issue of private land-use
    restrictions on amateur radio antennas. The proposed legislation would
    be the successor to the Amateur Radio Parity Act. The Legislative
    vocacy Committee, chaired by Pacific Division Director Jim Tiemstra,
    K6JAT, will report to the Board soon, once plans are fleshed out.
    Tiemstra told the ARRL Executive Committee (EC) on October 12 in
    Aurora, Colorado, that vocacy Committee members have traveled to
    Washington to meet on multiple occasions with members of Congress and
    their staffs to inform them of the committee's plans.

    ARRL Washington Counsel Dave Siddall, K3ZJ, told the EC last month that
    he understands the conditional exemption of amateur radio licensees
    from the RF exposure measurement requirements in the FCC's Part 97
    Amateur Service rules is proposed to be removed. A Report and Order in
    FCC Docket WT 13-84 is making the rounds that, if adopted, would make
    amateur licensees subject to the same requirements as all other FCC
    licensees. The Report and Order is expected to be released before
    year's end.

    Siddall also reported to the EC that the FCC is poised to address the
    60-meter band amateur allocation adopted at World Radiocommunication
    Conference 2015 (WRC-15). The National Telecommunications and
    Information ministration (NTIA), on behalf of US government primary
    users of the band, has insisted that the maximum permitted power for
    radio amateurs must not exceed that agreed to at WRC-15 -- 15 W
    effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP) or 9.1 W ERP -- despite the
    fact that Canada has authorized its amateur licensees to use 100 W, and
    eliminate the current discrete channels, which ARRL's petition proposed
    to retain. NTIA oversees federal government frequency allocations and
    users.

    Minutes of the October 12 Executive Committee meeting were posted this
    week on the ARRL website.
    WRC-19 Delegates Reach Agreement on 6-Meter Band in ITU Region 1

    World Radiocommunication Conference 2019 (WRC-19) has approved a
    6-meter allocation for International Telecommunication Region 1
    (Europe, Africa, the Middle East). The decision came after more than 2
    weeks of strenuous negotiations to reconcile widely disparate views of
    Region 1 administrations.

    "The result is a dramatic improvement in the international Radio
    Regulations for amateurs in Region 1," the International Amateur Radio
    Union (IARU) said in announcing the agreement.

    When the Final Acts take effect, 44 countries in Region 1 will have a
    primary allocation of at least 500 kHz, including 26 countries with a
    primary allocation of the 50 - 54 MHz. The entire region will have an
    amateur secondary allocation of 50 - 52 MHz, except in Russia, whose
    administration opted for only 50.080 - 50.280 MHz on a secondary basis.

    Provisions will be in place to protect other existing services using
    the band in Region 1 and in neighboring countries in Region 3. The
    existing primary allocation of 50 - 54 MHz in Regions 2 and 3 is
    unaffected.

    The decision on WRC-19 agenda item 1.1 is the culmination of years of
    effort by the IARU and its member-societies.

    Delegates this week faced a daunting workload as they tried to reach
    consensus on several remaining issues, including the agenda for the
    next WRC. The final session of the conference plenary to approve texts
    for inclusion in the Final Acts of the conference was set to wrap up on
    November 21.

    As of the end of last week, no choices had been made as to which of
    more than three dozen proposed topics will end up on the agenda for
    World Radiocommunication Conference 2023. Each proposed agenda item
    would require studies to be conducted between 2020 and 2023, but
    International Telecommunication Union (ITU) resources will not
    accommodate more than about half of the proposals. Some face strong
    opposition, while others remain ill-defined even at this late stage of
    the conference.
    * Short Duration Satellites: No agreement has been reached on how to
    protect existing services and uses of the uplink frequency band
    proposed for telemetry, tracking, and command of these "simple"
    satellites.
    * 5725 - 5850 MHz: This part of the amateur secondary allocation,
    which includes an amateur-satellite downlink at 5830 - 5850 MHz, is
    the subject of an unresolved conflict over parameters for wireless
    access systems, including radio local area networks.
    * Frequencies above 275 GHz: This upper frequency range is not
    allocated, but several bands are identified for passive
    (receive-only) use, and administrations are encouraged to protect
    them from harmful interference. With that in mind, WRC-19 has
    identified other bands above 275 GHz for the implementation of land
    mobile and fixed service applications. The use of these bands for
    applications in other services, including amateur experimentation,
    is not precluded.

    With the 50 MHz issue settled, the IARU team devoted most of its energy
    to explaining why the proposed Radionavigation Satellite Service (RNSS)
    agenda item for 1240 - 1300 MHz is unnecessary and undesirable. At
    issue is compatibility between radio amateurs, who are secondary on
    1240 - 1300 MHz, with Galileo RNSS (GPS) system receivers. The amateur
    community has advocated that this matter be dealt with through existing
    ITU processes rather than the 4 years of study that an agenda item
    would entail. Read more.

    Radio Amateur's "Tribute to a Century of Broadcasting" Video Debuts on
    YouTube

    Art Donahue, W1AWX, of Franklin, Massachusetts, has posted his "Tribute
    to a Century of Broadcasting" video in recognition of the centennial of
    formal radio broadcasts. The video features a complete scan of the AM
    broadcast band (530 - 1700 kHz), with station IDs for all 118 AM radio
    channels.

    Donahue told ARRL he recorded these off the air using two long-wire
    antennas in the trees. Each slide highlights one station on each
    frequency with call sign, location, power, day/night/gray-line
    reception, distance, and year of first broadcast, accompanied by audio
    of an actual station identification.

    "If you ever spent evenings when you were a kid trying to hear
    long-distance radio stations on your AM radio, this video has what they
    all sound like today," Donahue said. "I wanted to do something in honor
    of the KDKA broadcasting centennial next year and thought I'd try to
    get every single channel recorded. It took a lot of time, patience, and
    good luck. You'll hear a lot of surprises on the video."

    Donhaue added, "It was a fun project to work on."
    The Doctor Will See You Now!

    "Big Wire Antennas" is the topic of the new (November 21) episode of
    the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast. Listen...and learn!

    Sponsored by DX Engineering, ARRL The Doctor is In is an informative
    discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet, or
    smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like!

    Every 2 weeks, your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve Ford, WB8IMY, and
    the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, will discuss a broad range of
    technical topics. You can also email your questions to doctor@arrl.org,
    and the Doctor may answer them in a future podcast.

    Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone or
    iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can also
    listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration required,
    or browse the site as a guest) and through the free Stitcher app for
    iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never listened to a podcast
    before, download our beginner's guide.

    Melissa Stemmer Joins ARRL Headquarters Staff as Development Manager

    Connecticut native Melissa Stemmer has joined the ARRL Headquarters
    staff as Development Manager. Born and raised in Waterbury, Stemmer
    earned a bachelor's degree in pharmacy from the University of
    Connecticut in 1998, and she worked in that field for more than 15
    years. After deciding that a career change was in order, Stemmer went
    back to school, earning a master's in organizational leadership in 2015
    from Quinnipiac University.

    "I am so excited to be on this journey at ARRL, and I am looking
    forward to getting to know everyone," Stemmer said.

    Before coming to ARRL, she was the development director at Seven Angels
    Theatre in Waterbury. In September 2015, Stemmer signed on as
    coordinator of the theatre's annual High School Halo Awards -- the
    largest high school theatre award program in Connecticut.

    During her tenure at Seven Angels Theatre, Stemmer was an active member
    of the Waterbury Regional Chamber and the Waterbury Exchange Club. She
    served on the executive committee and governing council of the Arts and
    Culture Collaborative of the Waterbury Region and was a member of the
    Young Professionals Task Force of the Waterbury Region.
    Youth on the Air Camp Coming to the Americas

    The Electronic Applications Radio Service (EARS) has announced that the
    first Youth On The Air (YOTA) camp in the US is set to take place in
    June. Sponsors hope the camp will become an annual event.

    The inaugural summer camp will take place June 21 - 26 at the National
    Voice of America Museum of Broadcasting in West Chester Township, Ohio.
    The West Chester Amateur Radio Association (WC8VOA) will host the
    event. EARS is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization dedicated to
    wireless technologies and activities.

    According to the announcement, the camp will focus on building peer and
    mentor relationships and taking amateur radio "to the next level."
    Campers will learn and exercise on-the-air skills at special event
    station W8Y.

    For more information, email Camp Director Neil Rapp, WB9VPG, or call
    (812) 327-0749. (Read more.)

    Southern California Hams Support Major Terrorist Attacks Response Drill

    Seventy southern California amateur radio volunteers deployed to 30
    local hospitals, clinics, and city emergency operations centers on
    November 6 to support public safety and emergency medical functions
    during a mock terrorist response drill that tested law enforcement and
    medical treatment facilities in San Diego County.

    The scenario was a coordinated attack at two locations 50 miles apart
    that resulted in mass casualties and inundated local emergency
    departments with 1,000 volunteer actors suffering from simulated
    injuries and frantic families (also actors) trying to locate loved
    ones. One simulated attack occurred at California's LEGOLAND theme
    park, which closed for a half day to support the exercise. The other
    simulated attack occurred at a 20,000-seat amphitheater. During the
    5-hour exercise, hams relayed hundreds of formal ICS 213 messages via
    Winlink and voice nets from hospital to hospital and from hospitals to
    the County Medical Operations Center.

    Participants included hams aboard the 1,000-bed US Navy Hospital Ship
    USNS Mercy and those who checked in via HF from across the southwestern
    US.

    Hospitals used this full-scale exercise to fulfill their annual
    accreditation training requirement. Recent changes in California
    hospital regulations require smaller medical clinics to conduct annual
    certification drills, and that expansion of clinic participation has
    led to a flood of requests for trained radio operators at hundreds of
    day surgery clinics and group homes not covered previously by ARES.
    Because demand far exceeds the availability of ARES operators for
    mid-week daytime drills, ARRL San Diego Section Manager Dave
    Kaltenborn, N8KBC, has encouraged smaller clinics and medical networks
    to consider developing their own internal amateur radio capabilities.
    Several people involved at the smaller clinics have taken classes and
    training provided by ARES.

    The exercise included cross-border participation by members of Club de
    Radio Experimentadores de Baja California (CREBC) at Tijuana General
    Hospital in Tijuana, Mexico. CREBC hams maintain an extensive Winlink
    and repeater network used by amateurs on both sides of the border. --
    Thanks to ARRL San Diego Section Manager Dave Kaltenborn, N8KBC
    Dayton Hamvention^(R) Invites 2020 Award Nominations

    Dayton Hamvention^(R) is inviting nominations for its 2020 awards.
    Nominations are due by February 15, 2020. Awards will be granted for
    Amateur of the Year, Club of the Year, Technical Achievement, and
    Special Achievement.
    * The Amateur of the Year Award is given to a radio amateur who has
    made a long-term commitment to the advancement of amateur radio.
    This individual will have a history of ham radio contributions and
    demonstrated dedication to service, professionalism, and the
    advancement of the avocation of amateur radio.
    * [IMG]The Club of the Year will be honored for clearly demonstrating
    its involvement in varied aspects of amateur radio for the greater
    good of their community and/or nation.
    * The Technical Achievement Award recognizes a radio amateur who has
    achieved technical excellence in the world of amateur radio.
    Examples are inventions, processes, discoveries, experiments, and
    other technical accomplishments or achievements that contributed to
    amateur radio.
    * The Special Achievement Award recognizes a radio amateur who has
    made an outstanding contribution to the advancement of the radio
    art and/or science. This award is usually given to a respected
    amateur who spearheaded a single significant project.

    Nomination forms are specific to the award. At a minimum, each form
    should be completed with the information indicated. Provide contact
    information for the person making the nomination. Submit forms via
    email or via USPS to Hamvention, Attention: Awards Committee, Box 964,
    Dayton, Ohio 45401-0964.

    The Awards Committee will make its selections and announce the
    recipients along with details on their accomplishments. An honors
    convocation and award presentation will be held on the Saturday evening
    of Hamvention. Award presentations will also take place at Hamvention
    on Sunday afternoon, prior to the prize award activity.

    For more information, contact the Dayton Hamvention Awards Committee.

    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: Still no sunspots since November 2.
    Average daily solar flux during the reporting week dipped slightly from
    70.3 to 69.9. Geomagnetic conditions were quiet, with the average daily
    planetary A index dipping from 4 to 3.6, and the average mid-latitude A
    index going from 3 to 2.3.

    Predicted solar flux is 70 on November 21 - 22; 68 on November 23; 67
    on November 24 - 27; 69 on November 28 - December 8; 70 on December 9 -
    22, and 69 on December 23 - January 4.

    The predicted planetary A index is 20, 16, and 10 on November 21 - 23;
    8 on November 24 - 25; 5 on November 26 - December 12; 6 on December
    13; 5 on December 14 - 15; 8, 15, 20, 18, and 10 on December 16 - 20; 8
    on December 21 - 23, and 5 on December 24 - January 4.

    Sunspot numbers for November 14 - 20 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0, with
    a mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 69.9, 70, 69.7, 70.1, 70.4,
    69.2, and 70.2, with a mean of 69.9. Estimated planetary A indices were
    4, 4, 6, 5, 2, 2, and 2, with a mean of 3.6. The mid-latitude A index
    was 3, 2, 5, 3, 1, 1, and 1, with a mean of 2.3.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * November 23 - 24 -- CQ Worldwide DX Contest (CW)
    * November 27 -- SKCC Sprint (CW)
    * November 27 -- UKEICC 80-Meter Contest (CW)
    * November 28 -- 3.5 RSGB 80-Meter Autumn Series (CW)
    * December 1 -- Russian WW MultiMode Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * December 3 -- ARS Spartan Sprint (CW)
    * December 5 -- 1.8 QRP ARCI Topband Sprint (CW)
    * December 5 -- NRAU 10-Meter Activity Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * December 5 -- SKCC Sprint Europe (CW)
    * December 6 - 8 -- ARRL 160-Meter Contest (CW)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on amateur radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    Alaska and Tennessee Getting New Section Managers

    Two new Section Managers (SMs) have been declared elected in the
    just-concluded fall election cycle. Ballots for the Alaska and
    Tennessee Section Manager elections were counted on November 19 at ARRL
    Headquarters. Eight incumbent Section Managers ran without opposition
    during this election cycle. All terms of office start on January 1.

    In a very close race in Alaska, David Stevens, KL7EB, received 98
    votes, and his opponent, Lara Baker, AL2R, received 88 votes. Both are
    from Anchorage. Stevens served previously as Alaska's SM, from 1984
    until 1985; from 1998 until 1999, and from 2002 through 2007. Stevens
    takes over as Section Manager from Ray Hollenbeck, KL1IL, of Wasilla,
    who has led the Alaska Section for the past 4 years.

    In Tennessee, David Thomas, KM4NYI, of Knoxville, outpolled Charles
    Talley, KJ4KVC, of Lyles, 557 to 417. An active member of the Radio
    Amateur Club of Knoxville, Thomas serves on the club's Repeater
    Committee as a hands-on technician for the club's repeater suite. He
    enjoys restoring tube-type ham gear, operating HF, 6 meters, and
    digital modes.

    Thomas will be taking the reins of the Tennessee Field Organization
    from Keith Miller, N9DGK, of Rockvale, who decided not to run for a new
    term. Miller has served as Section Manager since 2012.

    These incumbent Section Managers were the only candidates in their
    respective sections and have been declared elected. JVann Martin, W4JVM
    (Alabama); Bill Duveneck, KB3KYH (Delaware); Jim Siemons, W6LK (East
    Bay); Ron Cowan, KB0DTI (Kansas); Jim Kvochick, K8JK (Michigan); Bill
    Mader, K8TE (New Mexico); John Kitchens, NS6X (Santa Barbara), and Ray
    Lajoie, KB1LRL (Western Massachusetts).
    Why Propagation Repeats About Every 27 Days

    The sun rotates in about 27 days, but different solar latitudes rotate
    with different periods. This is why propagation repeats roughly every
    27 days, as NASA explains.

    The sun's rotation was first detected by observing the motion of
    sunspots. The sun's rotation axis is tilted by about 7.25ų from the
    axis of Earth's orbit, so we see more of the sun's north pole in
    September and more of its south pole in March. Because the sun is a
    ball of gas/plasma, it does not have to rotate rigidly, as solid
    planets and moons do. In fact, the sun's equatorial regions rotate
    faster -- taking only about 24 days -- than the polar regions, which
    rotate once every 30+ days.

    The source of this "differential rotation" is an area of current
    research in solar astronomy. -- Thanks to The ARRL Contest Update and
    NASA
    In Brief...

    OH2BH to Be On the Air from Myanmar The government in Myanmar has given
    limited amateur operating privileges to Martti Laine, OH2BH. He will
    use XZ2D. Laine reports that authorities in the Southeast Asian nation
    have only permitted him to operate on 15 meters and higher, but he is
    hoping to obtain permission to operate on a spot frequency on 20
    meters. "Getting 14.065 kHz temporarily for the duration of 48 hours
    would be magic," Laine said. Members of the world-wide amateur
    community wrote the Myanmar government to support Laine. "As Radio
    Arcala, OH8X remains at their Climate Park with more than 110,000
    mangroves planted," he continued. "[O]ur dream remains to activate the
    Union of Myanmar from our own site from the noise-free Ayeyarwady
    Region of Myanmar." The XZ2D license is valid until April 17. Laine
    said he has been setting up his station and should be on the air on
    November 21. According to Club Log's DXCC Most Wanted list, Myanmar is
    #48.

    Happy 45th Birthday, AMSAT-OSCAR 7! The world's longest-lived
    satellite, AO-7, turned 45 years old this month. It was launched on
    November 15, 1974, from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. After
    nearly 7 years of service, AO-7 was thought to have reached the end of
    its life in June 1981 due to battery failure, and a premature obituary
    appeared in the AMSAT Satellite Report. In an interesting footnote,
    although AO-7 was thought to be nonfunctional after 1981, it's been
    reported that the Polish Solidarity movement used AO-7 to pass messages
    in 1982, while Poland was under martial law. Twenty years later, on
    June 21, 2002, G3IOR reported hearing "an old-style CW beacon" from an
    unknown OSCAR near 145.970 MHz. It didn't take long to identify the
    satellite as AO-7, which remains operational and well-used while it's
    in sunlight. To celebrate AO-7's 45th birthday, AMSAT plans to auction
    a set of gold-plated AO-7 cufflinks and a 50th Anniversary AMSAT lab
    coat (size 42R). The auctions are now live on eBay and will conclude
    shortly after 0200 UTC on November 26, 2019. AMSAT reports that 100% of
    the proceeds will go toward Keeping Amateur Radio in Space. -- Thanks
    to AMSAT News Service

    ARRL Self-Guided Emergency Communication Course EC-001-S is Now
    Available On Demand ARRL's EC-001-S online "Introduction to Emergency
    Communication" course is now available to students in an on-demand
    format, allowing students to register for the course and begin work at
    any time. This course is designed to provide basic knowledge and tools
    for any emergency communications volunteer. In response to the great
    course demand and to expand access to EC-001, ARRL developed a
    self-guided version of the course, EC-001-S, which launched in June.
    This version of the course is designed for those who prefer to work
    independently and who do not need guidance from an online mentor.
    EC-001-S was previously offered only during specific sessions along
    with the traditional mentored version. The course opened for general
    enrollment on November 6. Visit the ARRL Online Course Registration
    page for more information and to register.

    Florida and Georgia Amateur Radio Volunteers Support the Spaghetti 100
    Bicycle Ride Two dozen amateur radio volunteers from the Tallahassee
    Amateur Radio Society (TARS) in Florida and the Thomasville Amateur
    Radio Club (TARC) in Georgia provided communication support for the
    Capital City Cyclists' 35th annual Spaghetti 100 Bicycle Ride on
    November 9. The Spaghetti 100 funds the Kids on Bikes program, which
    teaches hundreds of elementary schoolers how to ride a bicycle safely
    and helps to support the Trips for Kids chapter, which takes
    disadvantaged youth on bike rides on local trails. The hams used one of
    the TARS VHF repeaters to provide communication for safety and
    logistics, as well as for the medical and mechanical teams. Cell phone
    coverage is very sparse along the 100-mile route on back-country roads
    in northern Florida and southern Georgia. Communications Coordinator
    Stan Zawrotny, K4SBZ, said the importance of ham radio's traditional
    role in filling communication gaps was brought home to him when the
    land line at the ride's headquarters was out for several hours, leaving
    amateur radio as the only communication for some areas. "In addition to
    the thanks given by most of the bicyclists as they passed by, event
    sponsors expressed their appreciation for the work of the ham radio
    volunteers and were impressed with the capabilities of amateur radio,"
    Zawrotny said.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * December 13 - 14 -- West Central Florida Section Convention, Plant
    City, Florida
    * January 4 -- New York City-Long Island Section Convention,
    Brookville, New York
    * January 17 - 18 -- North Texas Section Convention, Forest Hill,
    Texas
    * January 19 - 25 -- Quartzfest, Quartzsite, Arizona
    * January 24 - 26 -- Puerto Rico State Convention, Hatillo, Puerto
    Rico
    * January 25 -- ARRL Midwest Conference

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

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    Free of charge to ARRL members...
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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
    non-commercial or educational purposes, with attribution. All other
    purposes require written permission.


    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Nov 29 09:05:16 2019
    The ARRL Letter
    November 21, 2019

    * ARRL Legislative vocacy Committee Drafting New Bill dressing
    Antenna Restrictions
    * WRC-19 Delegates Reach Agreement on 6-Meter Band in ITU Region 1
    * Radio Amateur's "Tribute to a Century of Broadcasting" Video Debuts
    on YouTube
    * The Doctor Will See You Now!
    * Melissa Stemmer Joins ARRL Headquarters Staff as Development
    Manager
    * Youth on the Air Camp Coming to the Americas
    * Southern California Hams Support Major Terrorist Attacks Response
    Drill
    * Dayton Hamvention^(R) Invites 2020 Award Nominations
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * Alaska and Tennessee Getting New Section Managers
    * Why Propagation Repeats About Every 27 Days
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL Headquarters will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28 and
    29, for Thanksgiving. The ARRL Letter and ARRL Audio News will not be
    available on those days. The next editions will be on December 5 and 6,
    respectively. We wish everyone a safe and enjoyable Thanksgiving.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL Legislative vocacy Committee Drafting New Bill dressing
    Antenna Restrictions

    The ARRL Board of Directors Legislative vocacy Committee is in the
    process of drafting a new bill to address the issue of private land-use
    restrictions on amateur radio antennas. The proposed legislation would
    be the successor to the Amateur Radio Parity Act. The Legislative
    vocacy Committee, chaired by Pacific Division Director Jim Tiemstra,
    K6JAT, will report to the Board soon, once plans are fleshed out.
    Tiemstra told the ARRL Executive Committee (EC) on October 12 in
    Aurora, Colorado, that vocacy Committee members have traveled to
    Washington to meet on multiple occasions with members of Congress and
    their staffs to inform them of the committee's plans.

    ARRL Washington Counsel Dave Siddall, K3ZJ, told the EC last month that
    he understands the conditional exemption of amateur radio licensees
    from the RF exposure measurement requirements in the FCC's Part 97
    Amateur Service rules is proposed to be removed. A Report and Order in
    FCC Docket WT 13-84 is making the rounds that, if adopted, would make
    amateur licensees subject to the same requirements as all other FCC
    licensees. The Report and Order is expected to be released before
    year's end.

    Siddall also reported to the EC that the FCC is poised to address the
    60-meter band amateur allocation adopted at World Radiocommunication
    Conference 2015 (WRC-15). The National Telecommunications and
    Information ministration (NTIA), on behalf of US government primary
    users of the band, has insisted that the maximum permitted power for
    radio amateurs must not exceed that agreed to at WRC-15 -- 15 W
    effective isotropic radiated power (EIRP) or 9.1 W ERP -- despite the
    fact that Canada has authorized its amateur licensees to use 100 W, and
    eliminate the current discrete channels, which ARRL's petition proposed
    to retain. NTIA oversees federal government frequency allocations and
    users.

    Minutes of the October 12 Executive Committee meeting were posted this
    week on the ARRL website.
    WRC-19 Delegates Reach Agreement on 6-Meter Band in ITU Region 1

    World Radiocommunication Conference 2019 (WRC-19) has approved a
    6-meter allocation for International Telecommunication Region 1
    (Europe, Africa, the Middle East). The decision came after more than 2
    weeks of strenuous negotiations to reconcile widely disparate views of
    Region 1 administrations.

    "The result is a dramatic improvement in the international Radio
    Regulations for amateurs in Region 1," the International Amateur Radio
    Union (IARU) said in announcing the agreement.

    When the Final Acts take effect, 44 countries in Region 1 will have a
    primary allocation of at least 500 kHz, including 26 countries with a
    primary allocation of the 50 - 54 MHz. The entire region will have an
    amateur secondary allocation of 50 - 52 MHz, except in Russia, whose
    administration opted for only 50.080 - 50.280 MHz on a secondary basis.

    Provisions will be in place to protect other existing services using
    the band in Region 1 and in neighboring countries in Region 3. The
    existing primary allocation of 50 - 54 MHz in Regions 2 and 3 is
    unaffected.

    The decision on WRC-19 agenda item 1.1 is the culmination of years of
    effort by the IARU and its member-societies.

    Delegates this week faced a daunting workload as they tried to reach
    consensus on several remaining issues, including the agenda for the
    next WRC. The final session of the conference plenary to approve texts
    for inclusion in the Final Acts of the conference was set to wrap up on
    November 21.

    As of the end of last week, no choices had been made as to which of
    more than three dozen proposed topics will end up on the agenda for
    World Radiocommunication Conference 2023. Each proposed agenda item
    would require studies to be conducted between 2020 and 2023, but
    International Telecommunication Union (ITU) resources will not
    accommodate more than about half of the proposals. Some face strong
    opposition, while others remain ill-defined even at this late stage of
    the conference.
    * Short Duration Satellites: No agreement has been reached on how to
    protect existing services and uses of the uplink frequency band
    proposed for telemetry, tracking, and command of these "simple"
    satellites.
    * 5725 - 5850 MHz: This part of the amateur secondary allocation,
    which includes an amateur-satellite downlink at 5830 - 5850 MHz, is
    the subject of an unresolved conflict over parameters for wireless
    access systems, including radio local area networks.
    * Frequencies above 275 GHz: This upper frequency range is not
    allocated, but several bands are identified for passive
    (receive-only) use, and administrations are encouraged to protect
    them from harmful interference. With that in mind, WRC-19 has
    identified other bands above 275 GHz for the implementation of land
    mobile and fixed service applications. The use of these bands for
    applications in other services, including amateur experimentation,
    is not precluded.

    With the 50 MHz issue settled, the IARU team devoted most of its energy
    to explaining why the proposed Radionavigation Satellite Service (RNSS)
    agenda item for 1240 - 1300 MHz is unnecessary and undesirable. At
    issue is compatibility between radio amateurs, who are secondary on
    1240 - 1300 MHz, with Galileo RNSS (GPS) system receivers. The amateur
    community has advocated that this matter be dealt with through existing
    ITU processes rather than the 4 years of study that an agenda item
    would entail. Read more.

    Radio Amateur's "Tribute to a Century of Broadcasting" Video Debuts on
    YouTube

    Art Donahue, W1AWX, of Franklin, Massachusetts, has posted his "Tribute
    to a Century of Broadcasting" video in recognition of the centennial of
    formal radio broadcasts. The video features a complete scan of the AM
    broadcast band (530 - 1700 kHz), with station IDs for all 118 AM radio
    channels.

    Donahue told ARRL he recorded these off the air using two long-wire
    antennas in the trees. Each slide highlights one station on each
    frequency with call sign, location, power, day/night/gray-line
    reception, distance, and year of first broadcast, accompanied by audio
    of an actual station identification.

    "If you ever spent evenings when you were a kid trying to hear
    long-distance radio stations on your AM radio, this video has what they
    all sound like today," Donahue said. "I wanted to do something in honor
    of the KDKA broadcasting centennial next year and thought I'd try to
    get every single channel recorded. It took a lot of time, patience, and
    good luck. You'll hear a lot of surprises on the video."

    Donhaue added, "It was a fun project to work on."
    The Doctor Will See You Now!

    "Big Wire Antennas" is the topic of the new (November 21) episode of
    the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast. Listen...and learn!

    Sponsored by DX Engineering, ARRL The Doctor is In is an informative
    discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet, or
    smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like!

    Every 2 weeks, your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve Ford, WB8IMY, and
    the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, will discuss a broad range of
    technical topics. You can also email your questions to doctor@arrl.org,
    and the Doctor may answer them in a future podcast.

    Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone or
    iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can also
    listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration required,
    or browse the site as a guest) and through the free Stitcher app for
    iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never listened to a podcast
    before, download our beginner's guide.

    Melissa Stemmer Joins ARRL Headquarters Staff as Development Manager

    Connecticut native Melissa Stemmer has joined the ARRL Headquarters
    staff as Development Manager. Born and raised in Waterbury, Stemmer
    earned a bachelor's degree in pharmacy from the University of
    Connecticut in 1998, and she worked in that field for more than 15
    years. After deciding that a career change was in order, Stemmer went
    back to school, earning a master's in organizational leadership in 2015
    from Quinnipiac University.

    "I am so excited to be on this journey at ARRL, and I am looking
    forward to getting to know everyone," Stemmer said.

    Before coming to ARRL, she was the development director at Seven Angels
    Theatre in Waterbury. In September 2015, Stemmer signed on as
    coordinator of the theatre's annual High School Halo Awards -- the
    largest high school theatre award program in Connecticut.

    During her tenure at Seven Angels Theatre, Stemmer was an active member
    of the Waterbury Regional Chamber and the Waterbury Exchange Club. She
    served on the executive committee and governing council of the Arts and
    Culture Collaborative of the Waterbury Region and was a member of the
    Young Professionals Task Force of the Waterbury Region.
    Youth on the Air Camp Coming to the Americas

    The Electronic Applications Radio Service (EARS) has announced that the
    first Youth On The Air (YOTA) camp in the US is set to take place in
    June. Sponsors hope the camp will become an annual event.

    The inaugural summer camp will take place June 21 - 26 at the National
    Voice of America Museum of Broadcasting in West Chester Township, Ohio.
    The West Chester Amateur Radio Association (WC8VOA) will host the
    event. EARS is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization dedicated to
    wireless technologies and activities.

    According to the announcement, the camp will focus on building peer and
    mentor relationships and taking amateur radio "to the next level."
    Campers will learn and exercise on-the-air skills at special event
    station W8Y.

    For more information, email Camp Director Neil Rapp, WB9VPG, or call
    (812) 327-0749. (Read more.)

    Southern California Hams Support Major Terrorist Attacks Response Drill

    Seventy southern California amateur radio volunteers deployed to 30
    local hospitals, clinics, and city emergency operations centers on
    November 6 to support public safety and emergency medical functions
    during a mock terrorist response drill that tested law enforcement and
    medical treatment facilities in San Diego County.

    The scenario was a coordinated attack at two locations 50 miles apart
    that resulted in mass casualties and inundated local emergency
    departments with 1,000 volunteer actors suffering from simulated
    injuries and frantic families (also actors) trying to locate loved
    ones. One simulated attack occurred at California's LEGOLAND theme
    park, which closed for a half day to support the exercise. The other
    simulated attack occurred at a 20,000-seat amphitheater. During the
    5-hour exercise, hams relayed hundreds of formal ICS 213 messages via
    Winlink and voice nets from hospital to hospital and from hospitals to
    the County Medical Operations Center.

    Participants included hams aboard the 1,000-bed US Navy Hospital Ship
    USNS Mercy and those who checked in via HF from across the southwestern
    US.

    Hospitals used this full-scale exercise to fulfill their annual
    accreditation training requirement. Recent changes in California
    hospital regulations require smaller medical clinics to conduct annual
    certification drills, and that expansion of clinic participation has
    led to a flood of requests for trained radio operators at hundreds of
    day surgery clinics and group homes not covered previously by ARES.
    Because demand far exceeds the availability of ARES operators for
    mid-week daytime drills, ARRL San Diego Section Manager Dave
    Kaltenborn, N8KBC, has encouraged smaller clinics and medical networks
    to consider developing their own internal amateur radio capabilities.
    Several people involved at the smaller clinics have taken classes and
    training provided by ARES.

    The exercise included cross-border participation by members of Club de
    Radio Experimentadores de Baja California (CREBC) at Tijuana General
    Hospital in Tijuana, Mexico. CREBC hams maintain an extensive Winlink
    and repeater network used by amateurs on both sides of the border. --
    Thanks to ARRL San Diego Section Manager Dave Kaltenborn, N8KBC
    Dayton Hamvention^(R) Invites 2020 Award Nominations

    Dayton Hamvention^(R) is inviting nominations for its 2020 awards.
    Nominations are due by February 15, 2020. Awards will be granted for
    Amateur of the Year, Club of the Year, Technical Achievement, and
    Special Achievement.
    * The Amateur of the Year Award is given to a radio amateur who has
    made a long-term commitment to the advancement of amateur radio.
    This individual will have a history of ham radio contributions and
    demonstrated dedication to service, professionalism, and the
    advancement of the avocation of amateur radio.
    * [IMG]The Club of the Year will be honored for clearly demonstrating
    its involvement in varied aspects of amateur radio for the greater
    good of their community and/or nation.
    * The Technical Achievement Award recognizes a radio amateur who has
    achieved technical excellence in the world of amateur radio.
    Examples are inventions, processes, discoveries, experiments, and
    other technical accomplishments or achievements that contributed to
    amateur radio.
    * The Special Achievement Award recognizes a radio amateur who has
    made an outstanding contribution to the advancement of the radio
    art and/or science. This award is usually given to a respected
    amateur who spearheaded a single significant project.

    Nomination forms are specific to the award. At a minimum, each form
    should be completed with the information indicated. Provide contact
    information for the person making the nomination. Submit forms via
    email or via USPS to Hamvention, Attention: Awards Committee, Box 964,
    Dayton, Ohio 45401-0964.

    The Awards Committee will make its selections and announce the
    recipients along with details on their accomplishments. An honors
    convocation and award presentation will be held on the Saturday evening
    of Hamvention. Award presentations will also take place at Hamvention
    on Sunday afternoon, prior to the prize award activity.

    For more information, contact the Dayton Hamvention Awards Committee.

    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: Still no sunspots since November 2.
    Average daily solar flux during the reporting week dipped slightly from
    70.3 to 69.9. Geomagnetic conditions were quiet, with the average daily
    planetary A index dipping from 4 to 3.6, and the average mid-latitude A
    index going from 3 to 2.3.

    Predicted solar flux is 70 on November 21 - 22; 68 on November 23; 67
    on November 24 - 27; 69 on November 28 - December 8; 70 on December 9 -
    22, and 69 on December 23 - January 4.

    The predicted planetary A index is 20, 16, and 10 on November 21 - 23;
    8 on November 24 - 25; 5 on November 26 - December 12; 6 on December
    13; 5 on December 14 - 15; 8, 15, 20, 18, and 10 on December 16 - 20; 8
    on December 21 - 23, and 5 on December 24 - January 4.

    Sunspot numbers for November 14 - 20 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0, with
    a mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 69.9, 70, 69.7, 70.1, 70.4,
    69.2, and 70.2, with a mean of 69.9. Estimated planetary A indices were
    4, 4, 6, 5, 2, 2, and 2, with a mean of 3.6. The mid-latitude A index
    was 3, 2, 5, 3, 1, 1, and 1, with a mean of 2.3.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * November 23 - 24 -- CQ Worldwide DX Contest (CW)
    * November 27 -- SKCC Sprint (CW)
    * November 27 -- UKEICC 80-Meter Contest (CW)
    * November 28 -- 3.5 RSGB 80-Meter Autumn Series (CW)
    * December 1 -- Russian WW MultiMode Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * December 3 -- ARS Spartan Sprint (CW)
    * December 5 -- 1.8 QRP ARCI Topband Sprint (CW)
    * December 5 -- NRAU 10-Meter Activity Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * December 5 -- SKCC Sprint Europe (CW)
    * December 6 - 8 -- ARRL 160-Meter Contest (CW)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on amateur radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    Alaska and Tennessee Getting New Section Managers

    Two new Section Managers (SMs) have been declared elected in the
    just-concluded fall election cycle. Ballots for the Alaska and
    Tennessee Section Manager elections were counted on November 19 at ARRL
    Headquarters. Eight incumbent Section Managers ran without opposition
    during this election cycle. All terms of office start on January 1.

    In a very close race in Alaska, David Stevens, KL7EB, received 98
    votes, and his opponent, Lara Baker, AL2R, received 88 votes. Both are
    from Anchorage. Stevens served previously as Alaska's SM, from 1984
    until 1985; from 1998 until 1999, and from 2002 through 2007. Stevens
    takes over as Section Manager from Ray Hollenbeck, KL1IL, of Wasilla,
    who has led the Alaska Section for the past 4 years.

    In Tennessee, David Thomas, KM4NYI, of Knoxville, outpolled Charles
    Talley, KJ4KVC, of Lyles, 557 to 417. An active member of the Radio
    Amateur Club of Knoxville, Thomas serves on the club's Repeater
    Committee as a hands-on technician for the club's repeater suite. He
    enjoys restoring tube-type ham gear, operating HF, 6 meters, and
    digital modes.

    Thomas will be taking the reins of the Tennessee Field Organization
    from Keith Miller, N9DGK, of Rockvale, who decided not to run for a new
    term. Miller has served as Section Manager since 2012.

    These incumbent Section Managers were the only candidates in their
    respective sections and have been declared elected. JVann Martin, W4JVM
    (Alabama); Bill Duveneck, KB3KYH (Delaware); Jim Siemons, W6LK (East
    Bay); Ron Cowan, KB0DTI (Kansas); Jim Kvochick, K8JK (Michigan); Bill
    Mader, K8TE (New Mexico); John Kitchens, NS6X (Santa Barbara), and Ray
    Lajoie, KB1LRL (Western Massachusetts).
    Why Propagation Repeats About Every 27 Days

    The sun rotates in about 27 days, but different solar latitudes rotate
    with different periods. This is why propagation repeats roughly every
    27 days, as NASA explains.

    The sun's rotation was first detected by observing the motion of
    sunspots. The sun's rotation axis is tilted by about 7.25ų from the
    axis of Earth's orbit, so we see more of the sun's north pole in
    September and more of its south pole in March. Because the sun is a
    ball of gas/plasma, it does not have to rotate rigidly, as solid
    planets and moons do. In fact, the sun's equatorial regions rotate
    faster -- taking only about 24 days -- than the polar regions, which
    rotate once every 30+ days.

    The source of this "differential rotation" is an area of current
    research in solar astronomy. -- Thanks to The ARRL Contest Update and
    NASA
    In Brief...

    OH2BH to Be On the Air from Myanmar The government in Myanmar has given
    limited amateur operating privileges to Martti Laine, OH2BH. He will
    use XZ2D. Laine reports that authorities in the Southeast Asian nation
    have only permitted him to operate on 15 meters and higher, but he is
    hoping to obtain permission to operate on a spot frequency on 20
    meters. "Getting 14.065 kHz temporarily for the duration of 48 hours
    would be magic," Laine said. Members of the world-wide amateur
    community wrote the Myanmar government to support Laine. "As Radio
    Arcala, OH8X remains at their Climate Park with more than 110,000
    mangroves planted," he continued. "[O]ur dream remains to activate the
    Union of Myanmar from our own site from the noise-free Ayeyarwady
    Region of Myanmar." The XZ2D license is valid until April 17. Laine
    said he has been setting up his station and should be on the air on
    November 21. According to Club Log's DXCC Most Wanted list, Myanmar is
    #48.

    Happy 45th Birthday, AMSAT-OSCAR 7! The world's longest-lived
    satellite, AO-7, turned 45 years old this month. It was launched on
    November 15, 1974, from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. After
    nearly 7 years of service, AO-7 was thought to have reached the end of
    its life in June 1981 due to battery failure, and a premature obituary
    appeared in the AMSAT Satellite Report. In an interesting footnote,
    although AO-7 was thought to be nonfunctional after 1981, it's been
    reported that the Polish Solidarity movement used AO-7 to pass messages
    in 1982, while Poland was under martial law. Twenty years later, on
    June 21, 2002, G3IOR reported hearing "an old-style CW beacon" from an
    unknown OSCAR near 145.970 MHz. It didn't take long to identify the
    satellite as AO-7, which remains operational and well-used while it's
    in sunlight. To celebrate AO-7's 45th birthday, AMSAT plans to auction
    a set of gold-plated AO-7 cufflinks and a 50th Anniversary AMSAT lab
    coat (size 42R). The auctions are now live on eBay and will conclude
    shortly after 0200 UTC on November 26, 2019. AMSAT reports that 100% of
    the proceeds will go toward Keeping Amateur Radio in Space. -- Thanks
    to AMSAT News Service

    ARRL Self-Guided Emergency Communication Course EC-001-S is Now
    Available On Demand ARRL's EC-001-S online "Introduction to Emergency
    Communication" course is now available to students in an on-demand
    format, allowing students to register for the course and begin work at
    any time. This course is designed to provide basic knowledge and tools
    for any emergency communications volunteer. In response to the great
    course demand and to expand access to EC-001, ARRL developed a
    self-guided version of the course, EC-001-S, which launched in June.
    This version of the course is designed for those who prefer to work
    independently and who do not need guidance from an online mentor.
    EC-001-S was previously offered only during specific sessions along
    with the traditional mentored version. The course opened for general
    enrollment on November 6. Visit the ARRL Online Course Registration
    page for more information and to register.

    Florida and Georgia Amateur Radio Volunteers Support the Spaghetti 100
    Bicycle Ride Two dozen amateur radio volunteers from the Tallahassee
    Amateur Radio Society (TARS) in Florida and the Thomasville Amateur
    Radio Club (TARC) in Georgia provided communication support for the
    Capital City Cyclists' 35th annual Spaghetti 100 Bicycle Ride on
    November 9. The Spaghetti 100 funds the Kids on Bikes program, which
    teaches hundreds of elementary schoolers how to ride a bicycle safely
    and helps to support the Trips for Kids chapter, which takes
    disadvantaged youth on bike rides on local trails. The hams used one of
    the TARS VHF repeaters to provide communication for safety and
    logistics, as well as for the medical and mechanical teams. Cell phone
    coverage is very sparse along the 100-mile route on back-country roads
    in northern Florida and southern Georgia. Communications Coordinator
    Stan Zawrotny, K4SBZ, said the importance of ham radio's traditional
    role in filling communication gaps was brought home to him when the
    land line at the ride's headquarters was out for several hours, leaving
    amateur radio as the only communication for some areas. "In addition to
    the thanks given by most of the bicyclists as they passed by, event
    sponsors expressed their appreciation for the work of the ham radio
    volunteers and were impressed with the capabilities of amateur radio,"
    Zawrotny said.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * December 13 - 14 -- West Central Florida Section Convention, Plant
    City, Florida
    * January 4 -- New York City-Long Island Section Convention,
    Brookville, New York
    * January 17 - 18 -- North Texas Section Convention, Forest Hill,
    Texas
    * January 19 - 25 -- Quartzfest, Quartzsite, Arizona
    * January 24 - 26 -- Puerto Rico State Convention, Hatillo, Puerto
    Rico
    * January 25 -- ARRL Midwest Conference

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
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    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Dec 6 09:05:02 2019
    The ARRL Letter
    December 5, 2019

    * ARRL to Oppose Proposal to Eliminate 3.3 - 3.5 GHz Amateur
    Allocation
    * President Rick Roderick, K5UR, Heads ARRL Group on FCC Visits
    * Oldest Known US Ham Receives ARRL Centurion Award
    * The Doctor Will See You Now!
    * Past ARRL Chief Technology Officer Paul Rinaldo, W4RI, SK
    * Election will Result in ARRL Southeastern Division Leadership
    Changes
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * YOTA Month Expanding into the Americas
    * ITU Posts Provisional WRC-19 Final Acts
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    ARRL to Oppose Proposal to Eliminate 3.3 - 3.5 GHz Amateur Allocation

    At its December 12 open meeting, the FCC will consider adopting a
    Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) that proposes to remove the
    amateur radio 9-centimeter allocation at 3.3 - 3.5 GHz. ARRL plans to
    comment in opposition to the proposed action. According to an FCC "Fact
    Sheet," the proceeding WT Docket 19-348, "Facilitating Shared Use in
    the 3.1 - 3.55 GHz Band," is a follow-on from the MOBILE NOW Act,
    approved by the 115th Congress, which requires the FCC and the US
    Department of Commerce to make available new spectrum for mobile and
    fixed wireless broadband use. It also requires the FCC to work with the
    National Telecommunications and Information ministration (NTIA) to
    evaluate whether commercial wireless services and federal incumbents
    could share spectrum between 3.1 and 3.55 GHz. NTIA manages spectrum
    allocated to federal government users.

    "This Notice of Proposed Rulemaking would propose to remove the
    existing non-federal allocations in the 3.3 - 3.55 GHz band as a step
    towards potential future shared use between federal incumbents and
    commercial users," the FCC Fact Sheet explains. "By taking the initial
    step needed to clear the band of allocations for non-federal
    incumbents, the Commission furthers its continued efforts to make more
    mid-band spectrum potentially available to support next generation
    wireless networks."

    The NPRM proposes to clear the 3.3 - 3.55 GHz band of existing
    non-federal users by removing non-federal secondary radiolocation and
    amateur allocations [emphasis added] in the 3.3 - 3.55 GHz band and to
    relocate incumbent non-federal users out of the band. The FCC would
    seek comment on relocation options and "transition mechanisms" for
    incumbent non-federal users, either to the 3.1 - 3.3 GHz band or to
    other frequencies.

    Regarding the Amateur and Amateur-Satellite Service allocations, the
    FCC NPRM asks whether existing amateur spectrum in other bands might
    support operations currently conducted in the 3.3 - 3.5 GHz band. The
    3.40 - 3.41 GHz segment is designated for amateur satellite
    communication. "We seek comment on the extent to which the band is used
    for this purpose, whether existing satellites can operate on other
    amateur satellite bands, and on an appropriate timeframe for
    terminating these operations in this band," the FCC NPRM says.

    Also at its December 12 meeting, the FCC will consider another NPRM in
    WT Docket 19-138 that would "take a fresh and comprehensive look" at
    the rules for the 5.9 GHz band. The amateur radio 5-centimeter
    allocation is 5650.0 - 5925.0 MHz, and the NPRM, if approved, would
    address the top 75 MHz of that amateur secondary band. ARRL will also
    file comments opposing any changes affecting the 5-centimeter amateur
    allocation.

    Both draft FCC proposals are subject to change prior to a vote at the
    December 12 FCC meeting. Read more.
    President Rick Roderick, K5UR, Heads ARRL Group on FCC Visits

    President Rick Roderick, K5UR, and members of the ARRL Board's
    Executive Committee undertook a round of visits to FCC Headquarters in
    Washington on November 4 and 5. Topics focused on a number of pressing
    amateur radio-related issues. In addition to Roderick, members of the
    ARRL contingent included Atlantic Division Director Tom Abernethy,
    W3TOM; New England Division Director Fred Hopengarten, K1VR; Roanoke
    Division Director Bud Hippisley, W2RU; West Gulf Division Director John
    Robert Stratton, N5AUS, and ARRL Washington Counsel David Siddall,
    K3ZJ.

    Digital Data Symbol Rate Proceeding

    The ARRL delegation emphasized the overwhelming support for and need to
    remove symbol rate limits from the amateur rules, contending that the
    limits are outdated, no longer serve their original purpose of limiting
    signal bandwidth, and inhibit experimentation and development of
    digital communications techniques. Removing these limitations would
    also allow US radio amateurs to join those in other countries in using
    methods not permitted in the US.

    In 2016, the FCC had responded to ARRL's petition for rulemaking
    (RM-11708) by proposing no bandwidth limit. The ARRL delegation
    reiterated that adopting a 2.8 kHz maximum bandwidth in place of the
    symbol rate limit would promote sharing and experimentation below 30
    MHz.

    (L - R) Atlantic Division Director
    Tom Abernethy, W3TOM; ARRL President
    Rick Roderick, K5UR; West Gulf
    Division Director John Robert
    Stratton, N5AUS; Roanoke Division
    Director Bud Hippisley, W2RU; New
    England Division Director Fred
    Hopengarten, K1VR, and ARRL
    Washington Counsel David Siddall,
    K3ZJ.

    The ARRL representatives also discussed issues that some have raised --
    and on which the FCC did not request comment -- alleging that certain
    types of digital signals are "encrypted" because they are digitally
    compressed or otherwise can be difficult to receive over the air. The
    ARRL group pointed out that the FCC addressed the use of new digital
    techniques in 1995, amending its rules to authorize new digital
    techniques without prior FCC approval, as long as these were publicly
    documented consistent with three techniques specifically approved at
    the time. Since then, multiple digital methods have been developed and
    deployed without substantive complaints of insufficient documentation,
    the ARRL team noted.

    The prohibition on encryption is a provision of the ITU Radio
    Regulations and applies worldwide. The FCC regulation prohibiting
    "messages encoded for the purpose of obscuring their meaning" comes
    directly from the ITU Radio Regulations, language adopted at World
    Radiocommunication Conference 2003 (WRC-03) to replace a provision that
    limited amateur communications to "plain language." option of this
    change made clear that amateur communications encoded for digital
    transmission are authorized internationally as long as they're not
    encrypted. It was noted that techniques some commenters have targeted
    are widely used by amateurs around the world.

    60-Meter Band Allocation

    ARRL petitioned the FCC in RM-11785 to implement provisions adopted at
    WRC-15 that provide for a secondary amateur allocation at 5351.5 -
    5366.5 kHz. ARRL also proposed that 100 W ERP be permitted on the new
    band, consistent with that authorized for the current five 60-meter
    channels.

    The National Telecommunications and Information ministration (NTIA)
    has proposed in a letter to delete the existing four channels and
    substitute a secondary band allocation at a maximum permitted power of
    15 W EIRP (9.1 W ERP), as approved at WRC-15. The ARRL delegation
    expressed concern that NTIA's proposal would require relocation of
    existing channelized amateur activity to a 15 kHz band at a fraction of
    the power now authorized, despite an absence of any reported
    interference on the current channels. ARRL also expressed concern that
    9.1 W ERP would hamper emergency communication on the band, especially
    during hurricane season, when noise levels are usually high.

    The FCC is expected to issue a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) in
    December or early next year addressing 60 meters and inviting comments.

    Amateur Radio Enforcement

    ARRL Executive Committee members met with FCC Enforcement Bureau Chief
    Rosemary Harold and her senior staff to discuss amateur enforcement.
    The delegation updated progress in setting up the Volunteer Monitoring
    Program pursuant to the FCC/ARRL Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)
    signed last March. The program is in the final stages of training
    volunteers and is expected to be brought online in early 2020. Read
    more.

    Oldest Known US Ham Receives ARRL Centurion Award

    The oldest known US radio amateur, Cliff Kayhart, W4KKP, received his
    ARRL Centurion Award plaque in November. The award

    (L - R) Roanoke Division Director
    Bud Hippisley, W2RU; Cliff Kayhart,
    W4KKP; Roanoke Division Vice
    Director Bill Morine, N2COP, and
    South Carolina Section Manager Marc
    Tarplee, N4UFP.

    recognizes hams who have achieved centenarian status. Kayhart, who
    lives in White Rock, South Carolina, is 108. The ARRL Board of
    Directors conferred the award on Kayhart at its July 2019 meeting.

    At the November meeting of the Dutch Fork Amateur Radio Group in Little
    Mountain, South Carolina, ARRL Roanoke Division Director Bud Hippisley,
    W2RU, headed an ARRL delegation that presented the Centurion Award
    plaque to Kayhart, who was first licensed as W2LFE in 1937 (he's also
    held W9GNQ). With Hippisley for the presentation were Roanoke Division
    Vice Director Bill Morine, N2COP, and South Carolina Section Manager
    Marc Tarplee, N4UFP.

    Kayhart served in Iwo Jima during World War II, shortly after the US
    victory there, setting up long-range radio communication from the
    island to Tokyo to arrange for the eventual surrender by Japan.

    Kayhart remains active, checking into several nets from his assisted
    living facility. Centurion Award recipients have their annual ARRL
    membership fees waived while continuing to receive QST and other ARRL
    member benefits. Kayhart was profiled in the June 2018 issue of QST.
    The Doctor Will See You Now!

    "VHF/UHF propagation" is the topic of the new (December 5) episode of
    the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast. Listen...and learn!

    Sponsored by DX Engineering, ARRL The Doctor is In is an informative
    discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet, or
    smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like!

    Every 2 weeks, your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve Ford, WB8IMY, and
    the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, will discuss a broad range of
    technical topics. You can also email your questions to doctor@arrl.org,
    and the Doctor may answer them in a future podcast.

    Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone or
    iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can also
    listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration required,
    or browse the site as a guest) and through the free Stitcher app for
    iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never listened to a podcast
    before, download our beginner's guide.

    Past ARRL Chief Technology Officer Paul Rinaldo, W4RI, SK

    A titan of amateur radio, past ARRL Chief Technology Officer Paul L.
    Rinaldo, W4RI, of Burke, Virginia, died on November 29 after a period
    of failing health. An ARRL Life Member, Rinaldo was 88.

    "This is really sad news," ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR, remarked
    upon learning of Rinaldo's passing. "I worked with Paul on a number of
    things, and he amazed me with his knowledge and the different ways to
    consider issues. Smart. Highly respected. He sure helped us through the
    years in so many ways."

    First licensed in 1949 as W9IZA, Rinaldo's focus was always in the
    arena of technical experimentation. He studied radio engineering at
    Valparaiso Technical Institute in Indiana. Rinaldo was a cofounder and
    served as president of the Amateur Radio Research and Development
    Corporation (AMRAD). His first association with ARRL was an article,
    "Amateur Radio in the Computer Age," for the September 1979 edition of
    QST. Subsequently, he served in volunteer roles, among them as the
    first editor of QEX: The ARRL Experimenters' Exchange.

    In 1983, Rinaldo succeeded Doug DeMaw, W1FB, as ARRL Technical
    Department Manager and Senior Technical Editor. His efforts led to his
    appointment as Publications Manager and, 5 years later, as Manager of
    Technical Development with responsibility for preparing for the 1992
    World ministrative Radio Conference. This led to Rinaldo's supporting
    role in the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU), and he attended
    IARU ministrative Council (AC) meetings from 1996 to 2008.

    Rinaldo also took part in several International Telecommunication Union
    (ITU) conferences and served on numerous working parties and task
    groups. IARU Secretary David Sumner, K1ZZ, said amateur radio's
    successes at the just-ended WRC-19 were, in large part, because of
    Rinaldo's good work over the years.

    In 1992, Rinaldo established ARRL's Technical Relations Office in the
    Washington, DC, area. In 2004, the ARRL Board of Directors elected
    Rinaldo as ARRL's first Chief Technology Officer, a post he held until
    his retirement in 2008. "For the past 16 years, Paul has been the face
    and voice of amateur radio in the technical circles of the federal
    government and one of our most visible representatives at the ITU,"
    Sumner said at the time.

    Murphy Funeral Homes of Falls Church, Virginia, is handling
    arrangements. Read more.
    Election will Result in ARRL Southeastern Division Leadership Changes

    A new ARRL Director and Vice Director will take office on January 1 in
    ARRL's Southeastern Division. The vote count in contested Division
    races at ARRL Headquarters on November 15 saw Mickey Baker, N4MB,
    defeating incumbent Director Greg Sarratt, W4OZK, 2,132 votes to 1,739
    votes. In addition, challenger James Schilling, KG4JSZ, received 1,356
    votes to win a three-way race for Vice Director, outpolling incumbent
    Joseph Tiritilli, N4ZUW, who received 1,209 votes, and challenger Jeff
    Stahl, K4BH, who received 1,281 votes. In 2016, Sarratt was the lone
    candidate for office, regaining the Director's seat after being
    narrowly unseated in 2013 when he stood for re-election. Tiritelli was
    the only candidate to fill the vacant Southeastern Division Vice
    Director's chair that same year.

    In the only other contested race, incumbent West Gulf Division Director
    John Robert Stratton, N5AUS, defeated challenger Madison Jones, W5MJ,
    for re-election, by a vote of 2,498 to 1,405. Stratton moved into the
    Director's seat last January after past Director David Woolweaver,
    K5RAV, stepped down. West Gulf Division Vice Director Lee Cooper,
    W5LHC, was unopposed for a full term after being appointed earlier this
    year to succeed Stratton.

    Seats for Director and Vice Director in three other ARRL Divisions were
    unchallenged, and candidates were considered re-elected. These included
    Pacific Division Director Jim Tiemstra, K6JAT, and Vice Director
    Kristen McIntyre, K6WX; Rocky Mountain Division Director Jeff Ryan,
    K0RM, and Vice Director Robert Wareham, N0ESQ, and Southwestern
    Division Director Richard Norton, N6AA. Mark Weiss, K6FG, ran unopposed
    for the Southwestern Division Vice Director's seat, being vacated by
    Ned Stearns, AA7A.

    The ARRL Board of Directors next meets in January.

    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: No sunspots again this week. This run
    of zero sunspots has gone on for more than 3 weeks.

    Average daily solar flux for the November 28 - December 4 reporting
    week was 70.2. The predicted solar flux for every one of the next 45
    days is 70. The predicted planetary A index is 5 on December 5 - 7; 8
    on December 8 - 9; 5 on December 10 - 12; 6 on December 13; 5 on
    December 14 - 17; 12, 10, 8, and 8 on December 18 - 21; 5 on December
    22 - 29; 8 on December 30 - 31; 5 on January 1 - 3; 8 on January 4; 5
    on January 5 - 8; 6 on January 9; 5 on January 10 - 13; 12, 10, 8, and
    8 on January 14 - 17, and 5 on January 18.

    Spaceweather.com pointed out the Geminid meteor shower will peak
    December 13 - 14, just in time for the ARRL 10-Meter Contest December
    14 - 15. Ionized meteor trails may enhance 10-meter propagation.

    Sunspot numbers for November 28 - December 4 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and
    0, with a mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 70.2, 69.8, 70.4,
    71.2, 70.4, 69.9, and 69.6, with a mean of 70.4. Estimated planetary A
    indices were 4, 5, 4, 4, 2, 2, and 3, with a mean of 8.3. Middle
    latitude A index was 2, 3, 2, 2, 2, 1, and 2, with a mean of 5.7.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * December 6 - 8 -- ARRL 160-Meter Contest (CW)
    * December 7 -- Wake-Up! QRP Sprint (CW)
    * December 7 - 8 -- UFT Contest (CW)
    * December 7 - 8 -- SKCC Weekend Sprintathon (CW)
    * December 7 - 8 -- International Naval Contest (CW, phone)
    * December 7 - 8 -- PRO CW Contest
    * December 7 - 8 -- FT8 Roundup
    * December 7 - 8 -- EPC Ukraine DX Contest (Digital)
    * December 8 -- QRP ARCI Holiday Spirits Homebrew Sprint (CW)
    * December 9 -- 4 States QRP Group Second Sunday Sprint (CW, phone)
    * December 11 -- NAQCC CW Sprint

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on amateur radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.

    YOTA Month Expanding into the Americas

    December is Youth on the Air (YOTA) Month, when stations operated by
    young radio amateurs around the world will get on the air to celebrate
    youth in amateur radio. YOTA Month began a few years ago in
    International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) Region 1, and the concept has
    now taken root in the Americas as YOTA Month in the Americas.

    During YOTA Month, radio amateurs aged 25 and younger will be on the
    air as special event stations during December on various bands and
    modes. In the US, look for K8Y, K8O, K8T, and K8A. Elsewhere in the
    Americas, VE7YOTA will be on the air from Canada. XR2YOTA in Chile has
    been added to the list of youth stations in the Americas for YOTA
    Month. Young hams in other countries may also join in. Listen for other
    YOTA Month stations with "YOTA" suffixes.

    For more information about YOTA in the Americas, contact YOTA Month in
    the Americas Coordinator Bryant Rascoll, KG5HVO, or YOTA in the
    Americas Camp Director Neil Rapp, WB9VPG.

    Participants earn certificates by working the various YOTA-suffix
    stations on the air throughout December. Not a contest, the event is
    aimed at getting as many youngsters on air from as many countries as
    possible. The event takes place from 0000 UTC on December 1 until 2359
    UTC on December 31.

    Other special call signs planning to be on the air include 5B19YOTA,
    7X2YOTA, 7X3YOTA, 9A19YOTA, DH0YOTA, E71YOTA, EF4YOTA, EG2YOTA,
    EI0YOTA, EM5YOTA, EM6YOTA, ET3YOTA, GB19YOTA, HA6YOTA, HB9YOTA,
    HG0YOTA, II4YOTA, II8YOTA, LY5YOTA, OH2YOTA, OL19YOTA, ON4YOTA,
    PA6YOTA, PD6YOTA, SH9YOTA, TC19YOTA, TC3YOTA, TM19YOTA, YO0YOTA,
    YT19YOTA, ZL6YOTA, and ZS9YOTA.

    Most will put their logs on Logbook of The World (LoTW) with paper
    cards available through Club Log OQRS. QSL direct via M0SDV. -- Thanks
    to YOTA and YOTA in the Americas
    ITU Posts Provisional WRC-19 Final Acts

    The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) has posted the
    provisional Final Acts of World Radiocommunication Conference 2019
    (WRC-19) on its website as a 567-page PDF. Sponsored by the ITU,
    WRC-19, held in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, wrapped up on Friday,

    WRC-19 participants (L - R) Hans
    Blondeel Timmerman, PB2T; Bryan
    Rawlings, VE3QN; Dave Court, EI3IO;
    Ulrich Mueller, DK4VW; David Sumner,
    K1ZZ; Dale Hughes, VK1DSH, and
    Murray Niman, G6JYB. [Ulrich
    Mueller, DK4VW, photo]

    November 22. The month-long event was the largest ever, with some 3,300
    delegates in attendance. The WRC-19 Final Acts will take effect on
    January 21, 2021.

    During the last week of the conference, meetings often ran into the wee
    hours in an effort to get work completed on schedule. The prime amateur
    radio agenda item involved agreement on a 6-meter band allocation for
    ITU Region 1 (Europe, Africa, and the Middle East). When the Final Acts
    take effect, 44 countries in Region 1 will have a primary allocation of
    at least 500 kHz, including 26 countries with a primary allocation of
    50 - 54 MHz. The entire region will have an amateur secondary
    allocation of 50 - 52 MHz, except Russia, whose administration opted
    for only 50.080 - 50.280 MHz on a secondary basis.

    The International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) called the 6-meter outcome
    "a dramatic improvement in the international Radio Regulations for
    amateurs in Region 1." The next WRC will be in 2023.
    In Brief...

    [IMG]Orlando HamCation^(R) 2020 visitors in February will be able to
    navigate the convention with ARRL's free mobile event app, ARRL Events.
    First introduced for the Dayton Hamvention^(R) in May 2019, the app
    received extremely positive reviews from users. ARRL has partnered with
    Orlando HamCation and Dayton Hamvention to re-introduce the app for
    these 2020 events. "The user-friendly event app will help
    convention-goers find exhibits and forums, follow prize drawings, and
    connect with other attendees," said ARRL Convention and Event
    Coordinator Eric Casey, KC2ERC, who has been working with Orlando
    HamCation Committee members to help ready the app for the 2020 event.
    The free ARRL Events app will be available in late December for both
    Apple iOS and Android devices, along with a web-browser version.
    Orlando HamCation 2020 takes place February 7 - 9 and has been
    sanctioned as the 2020 ARRL Northern Florida Section Convention. Visit
    the HamCation website to purchase tickets.

    [IMG]Dayton Hamvention^(R) is increasing the cost of admission and its
    booth fees. Hamvention General Chair Jack Gerbs, WB8SCT, announced this
    week that general admission would rise by $4 per ticket to $26 in
    advance or $31 at the gate. The cost of flea market spots will go up by
    $5 per space, and inside exhibitors will pay $30 more. "Hamvention has
    always strived to produce a very high-quality event for amateur radio
    enthusiasts from around the globe," Gerbs said. "We have always felt it
    is imperative that we give back to amateur radio at many levels. We
    have been very generous in our support over the years." He cited "the
    economic pressures to present a show like Hamvention" as the reason for
    the price increases.

    ARRL is inviting listeners of the So Now What? podcast for amateur
    radio newcomers to take a brief survey about the bi-weekly podcast. The
    survey will close on December 13. -- Thanks to Michelle Patnode, W3MVP,
    ARRL Communications Content Producer

    Just after announcing the release of WSJT-X version 2.1.1, the WSJT
    Development Group issued a second bug-fix release, version 2.1.2.
    WSJT-X is the free software suite that includes the FT4 and FT8
    protocols. According to the developers, an error in the code broke the
    WSJT-X rig control features for certain Icom radios. The Release Notes
    detail program changes made since WSJT-X 2.1.0. The WSJT-X 2.1 User
    Guide has also been updated. Upgrading from earlier versions of WSJT-X
    should be seamless, with no need to uninstall previous versions or move
    any files. Links to installation packages are available. The WSJT
    Development Group asks those using the code to let the developers know,
    as well as to report bugs or suggest improvements to the code.

    AMPRNet Cofounder Brian Kantor, WB6CYT, of San Diego, California, has
    died unexpectedly. He retired 2 years ago after 47 years of service on
    staff at the University of California, San Diego. Kantor and Phil Karn,
    KA9Q, founded AMPRNet -- the TCP/IP over amateur radio network -- in
    the 1980s, and Kantor continued to manage it until his death. He
    recently created and served as chair and CEO of Amateur Radio Digital
    Communications (ARDC), a charitable foundation funded by the sale of
    unused AMPRNet IPv4 addresses. ARDC promotes STEM education and amateur
    radio digital development through scholarships and by funding the
    development of open-source hardware and software. It recently announced
    its first grant, to Amateur Radio on the International Space Station
    (ARISS). Kantor was also a key player in AMSAT's early internet
    presence.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * December 13 - 14 -- West Central Florida Section Convention, Plant
    City, Florida
    * January 4 -- New York City-Long Island Section Convention,
    Brookville, New York
    * January 17 - 18 -- North Texas Section Convention, Forest Hill,
    Texas
    * January 19 - 25 -- Quartzfest, Quartzsite, Arizona
    * January 24 - 26 -- Puerto Rico State Convention, Hatillo, Puerto
    Rico
    * January 25 -- ARRL Midwest Conference, Collinsville, Illinois

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

    .

    .
    * Join or Renew Today! ARRL membership includes QST, amateur radio's
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    Subscribe to...
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    Free of charge to ARRL members...
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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
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    purposes require written permission.


    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Dec 13 09:05:02 2019
    The ARRL Letter
    December 12, 2019

    * FCC Amending Amateur Radio RF Exposure Safety Rules
    * ARRL Asks FCC to Dismiss Petition Seeking Declaratory Ruling on
    Encoded Message Rule
    * A 600 W Broadband HF Amplifier Using Economically Priced LDMOS
    Devices
    * The Doctor Will See You Now!
    * NOAA/NASA Panel Concurs that Solar Cycle 25 will Peak in July 2025
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * Collegiate QSO Party 2018 and 2019 Plaque Recipients Announced
    * Melissa Pore, KM4CZN, is 2020 Carole Perry Educator of the Year
    Award Recipient
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    FCC Amending Amateur Radio RF Exposure Safety Rules

    The FCC is amending its Part 97 Amateur Service rules relating to RF
    exposure safety. In a lengthy document in ET Docket 19-226 released on
    December 4 and addressing a broad range of RF safety issues, the FCC
    said current amateur radio RF exposure safety limits will remain
    unchanged, but that the amateur-specific exemption from having to
    conduct an RF exposure evaluation will be replaced by the FCC's general
    exemption criteria. Radio amateurs have always had to comply with RF
    exposure limits, but certain stations have been exempt from having to
    conduct evaluations based only upon power and frequency. The Commission
    indicated that, by and large, if an RF source was "categorically
    excluded" from routine evaluation under the old rules, it will most
    likely still be exempt under the new rules, which are expected to take
    effect in the next couple of months.

    "For applicants and licensees in the Amateur Radio Service, we
    substitute our general exemption criteria for the specific exemption
    from routine evaluation based on power alone in Section 97.13(c)(1) and
    specify the use of occupational/controlled limits for amateurs where
    appropriate," the FCC said.

    "The sky is not falling here," ARRL Lab Manager Ed Hare, W1RFI,
    commented. "The major aspects of the rules will not impose major new
    burdens on the Amateur Radio Service. As in all regulatory matters,
    though, the devil may be in the details, so the ARRL technical staff,
    legal staff, and the experts on the ARRL RF Safety Committee are
    carefully evaluating this FCC document."

    Under the revised Section 97.13(c)(1), "In lieu of evaluation with the
    general population/uncontrolled exposure limits, amateur licensees may
    evaluate their operation with respect to members of his or her
    immediate household using the occupational/controlled exposure limits
    in Section 1.1310, provided appropriate training and information has
    been accessed by the amateur licensee and members of his/her
    household," the amended rule says.

    An FCC OET Bulletin 65 illustration
    of how to determine exposure
    distances.

    "RF exposure of other nearby persons who are not members of the amateur
    licensee's household must be evaluated with respect to the general
    population/uncontrolled exposure limits. Appropriate methodologies and
    guidance for evaluating Amateur Radio Service operation is described in
    the Office of Engineering and Technology (OET) Bulletin 65, Supplement
    B," the revised rule concludes.

    The FCC said it was not persuaded by ARRL's argument in its comments
    that the routine evaluation exemption for amateur radio stations
    operating below a certain power threshold should be maintained.
    "Amateur radio licensees operate a variety of installations of
    different size, power, and frequency, which can be located in close
    proximity to people, giving rise to various RF exposure concerns," the
    FCC noted.

    In a meeting with FCC OET Chief Julius Knapp and senior staff in early
    November, ARRL asked the FCC to make available on the internet a
    calculator to facilitate making the correct calculations the rules
    require. ARRL said that would be preferable to unofficial third-party
    calculators, the results from which might not be accorded the same
    degree of deference in local disputes. Several software programs were
    suggested as models.

    The FCC did not single out amateur radio in drafting its latest RF
    exposure rules. The rules affect multiple services, and exemptions for
    many other services were also deleted as part of a broader policy
    driven by a proliferation of RF devices, some resulting in situations
    where gain antennas are sited much closer to people than was expected
    in 1996 when the rules were last revised.
    ARRL Asks FCC to Dismiss Petition Seeking Declaratory Ruling on Encoded
    Message Rule

    ARRL has asked the FCC to dismiss a Petition for Declaratory Ruling
    filed by New York University (NYU), that in ARRL's view proposes a new
    interpretation of the rule -- Section 97.113(a)(4) -- prohibiting
    "messages encoded for the purpose of obscuring their meaning." In its
    December 2 filing, ARRL said NYU's call to "clarify" the rule's meaning
    to prohibit "effectively encrypted or encoded messages, including
    messages that cannot be readily decoded over the air for true meaning,"
    is not only vague but could weaken the prohibition against encryption.

    ARRL pointed out that the FCC rule prohibiting "messages encoded for
    the purpose of obscuring their meaning," is essentially the same as
    what appears in the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Radio
    Regulations applying to all countries. ARRL made clear that it
    continues to support rules prohibiting encrypted messages on the
    amateur bands, even for limited emergency communication purposes, and
    the ARRL Board reiterated that opposition last July.

    In its comments, ARRL said that NYU's request that the FCC adopt its
    suggested language would introduce ambiguity and confusion in the
    application of a rule that's clearly understood to prohibit encrypted
    messages. ARRL noted that Morse code is encoded and would fall within
    the prohibition as proposed by NYU. "The very fact that messages sent
    in CW are 'encoded' by any definition of the term starkly demonstrates
    the problem with this proposal," ARRL said.

    ARRL said that adding the word "effectively" would make the definition
    even more vague by including all encoded messages plus an additional
    set of undefined messages, the extent of which is unknown. Similarly,
    ARRL maintained, it is "unclear and undetermined what the petitioner
    may mean by 'effectively encrypted.'" Encryption is a binary
    proposition, ARRL pointed out, and the meaning either is hidden from
    all but the intended recipient(s) or it is not; a message cannot be
    considered "encrypted" if the means to enable non-recipients to
    understand the message are generally available.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    "The Commission has addressed amateur use of digital signals in
    multiple proceedings [and] there has been no showing that the current
    regulatory scheme is deficient in prohibiting encrypted messages," ARRL
    concluded.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    "ding the modifier 'effectively' to 'encrypted' converts clear
    meaning into vague uncertainty," ARRL asserted. FCC rules explicitly
    authorize radio amateurs to use new digital techniques on the condition
    that the techniques be described adequately and available publicly,
    ARRL said, pointing to multiple filings in the FCC record from
    individuals who have successfully used the public descriptions to
    decode the digital techniques with which NYU has expressed concern.

    NYU has not presented any information to demonstrate that the FCC's
    current rule is not being complied with by digital innovators, ARRL
    said, and adoption of NYU's petition would create more questions for
    the FCC than it would be able to answer if called upon to apply the
    petition's vague language in specific cases.

    "We are unaware of any enforcement case in which the Commission is
    experiencing difficulty in understanding and applying the prohibition
    against encrypted messages," ARRL maintained.

    What the petitioner regards as violations "augurs against its proposal
    to interpret in some new fashion the international and domestic
    prohibition," ARRL said. "For example," ARRL continued, "the petitioner
    asserts, without any basis in fact, that dynamic compression techniques
    effectively encrypt or encode communications." Such techniques are
    widely recognized ways to increase the efficiency of digital
    transmissions," ARRL noted that comments in the record clearly state
    that signals using dynamic compression are being decoded by third-party
    listeners.

    "The Commission has addressed amateur use of digital signals in
    multiple proceedings [and] there has been no showing that the current
    regulatory scheme is deficient in prohibiting encrypted messages," ARRL
    concluded. "To the contrary, adoption of the petitioner's proposals
    would add confusion -- rather than clarity -- and diverge from the
    international consensus on prohibiting encrypted messages while
    fostering vibrant experimentation with digital techniques."

    A 600 W Broadband HF Amplifier Using Economically Priced LDMOS Devices

    Razvan Fatu, M0HZH/YO9IRF, has designed and built a 600 W broadband HF
    amateur radio amplifier that uses a pair of low-cost MRF300 LDMOS
    (laterally diffused metal-oxide semiconductor) MOSFET devices. LDMOS
    devices are widely used in RF power amplifiers. Fatu's model A600, now
    at version 1.2, was designed to demonstrate the capabilities of MRF300s
    as linear broadband devices in the 2 - 50 MHz range.

    "The announcement of the MRF300 and MRF101 transistors by NXP in 2018
    has generated quite a spark of interest in the amateur radio community,
    and as soon as I learned about them, I wanted to get some on my
    workbench," Fatu said. He has entered his project in the NXP Homebrew
    RF Design Challenge 2019.

    "To achieve the target of 600 W output while also minimizing the level
    of even-number harmonics, a push-pull configuration of two transistors
    is used," he explains. "Luckily, the manufacturer made it easy to
    design the PCB layout for such a thing by offering two versions -- the
    MRF300AN and MRF300BN -- that have mirrored pinouts." The individual
    transistors are specified at 330 W output and come in a TO-247 package,
    with the source connected to the tab. The recommended supply range is
    30 - 50 V dc. "By studying the specifications, it looks like with
    correct broadband matching and some operational safety margin, we can
    get close to 600 W output at a voltage of around 45 V across a
    reasonably large bandwidth; the aim is to cover 1.8 to 54 MHz," Fatu
    said. "Main challenges when designing this amplifier are related to
    achieving good input and output matching over the entire frequency
    range as well as maintaining high and flat gain. Good linearity and a
    low level of harmonic products are mandatory. As the TO-247 is not a
    package specifically designed for high-power RF, there are some
    challenges with thermal design and PCB layout as well."

    "This is a homebrew project, so the
    test setup is pretty typical of a
    hobbyist's test bench," Fatu said.
    "Most of the equipment is not of
    lab-grade precision, but still
    accurate enough for amateur radio."

    The circuit uses a 4:1 transformer at the input.

    He used surface-mount devices wherever possible, to minimize stray
    inductance, and designed the circuit board power traces to be thick
    enough to support the high current. Traces also were sized for the
    right trace impedance where possible, he explained. Fatu installed an
    intermediary 3-millimeter-thick copper plate between the transistors
    and the aluminum heatsink. He used a liquid metal product called
    Galinstan which, he said, offers exceptional thermal and electrical
    conductivity and doesn't require much pressure to achieve best
    performance.

    During testing, he found that the amplifier will put out about 580 W at
    3.7 MHz and works most efficiently in the higher bands. "The highest
    output power I've measured was 840 W in the 10-meter band, but the wave
    was distorted and the harmonic levels were high," Fatu said.

    He has posted a video in addition to an online article.
    The Doctor Will See You Now!

    "VHF/UHF Propagation" is the topic of the current (December 5) episode
    of the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast. Listen...and learn!

    Sponsored by DX Engineering, ARRL The Doctor is In is an informative
    discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet, or
    smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like!

    ARRL The Doctor is In features your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve
    Ford, WB8IMY, and the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, discussing a
    broad range of technical topics.

    Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone or
    iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can also
    listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration required,
    or browse the site as a guest) and through the free Stitcher app for
    iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never listened to a podcast
    before, download our beginner's guide.

    NOAA/NASA Panel Concurs that Solar Cycle 25 will Peak in July 2025

    The NOAA/NASA-co-chaired international Solar Cycle Prediction Panel has
    released its latest forecast for the coming Solar Cycle 25. The panel's
    consensus calls for a peak in July 2025 (ń8 months), with a smoothed
    sunspot number of 115. The panel agreed that Cycle 25 will be of
    average intensity and similar to Cycle 24. The panel additionally
    concurred that the solar minimum between Cycles 24 and 25 will occur in
    April 2020 (ń6 months). If the solar minimum prediction is correct,
    this would make Solar Cycle 24 the seventh longest on [IMG]record at
    11.4 years. In its preliminary forecast released last April, the
    scientists on the panel forecast that Solar Cycle 25 would likely be
    weak, much like the current Cycle 24.

    "Solar Cycle 25 may have a slow start, but is anticipated to peak with
    solar maximum occurring between 2023 and 2026, and a sunspot range of
    95 to 130. This is well below the average number of sunspots," the
    panel said last spring, adding with "high confidence" that Cycle 25
    "should break the trend of weakening solar activity seen over the past
    four cycles." The panel said the expectation that Cycle 25 would be
    comparable in size to Cycle 24 suggests that the steady decline in
    solar cycle amplitude seen from Cycle 21 through Cycle 24 has ended and
    that there is no indication of an approaching "Maunder-type" minimum.
    Cycle 24 peaked in April 2014 with an average sunspot number of 82.

    The Solar Cycle Prediction Panel forecasts the number of sunspots
    expected for solar maximum, along with the timing of the peak and
    minimum solar activity levels for the cycle. It is comprised of
    scientists representing NOAA, NASA, the International Space Environment
    Services, and other US and international scientists.
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: Spaceweather.com says that Wednesday,
    December 11, was the 28th consecutive day of no sunspots. To date in
    2019, 77% of days had no sunspots. Compare this to the previous solar
    minimum: In 2008, 73% of days were spotless, and in 2009, 71% of days
    had no sunspots.

    The average daily solar flux for the December 5 - 11 reporting week was
    70.7, up marginally from the previous week's 70.2.

    At the bottom of the solar cycle, hardly any geomagnetic activity
    occurs, with average daily planetary A index at 3.7 and average middle
    latitude A index at 1.9. This is very quiet and is favorable to
    propagation on 160 meters.

    As was the case in last week's bulletin, the predicted solar flux is 70
    on each of the next 45 days -- until January 25.

    The predicted planetary A index is 5, 8, and 8 on December 12 - 14; 5
    on December 15 - 17; 12 on December 18; 10 on December 19 - 21; 5 on
    December 22 - January 4; 8 on January 5; 5 on January 6 - 8; 8 on
    January 9 - 10; 5 on January 11 - 13; 12 on January 14; 10 on January
    15 - 17, and 5 on January 18 - 25.

    Sunspot numbers for December 5 - 11 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0, with
    a mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 70.7, 70.3, 70.2, 71.6, 70.7,
    70.6, and 70.7, with a mean of 70.7. Estimated planetary A indices were
    3, 4, 2, 3, 4, 4, and 6, with a mean of 3.7. Middle latitude A index
    was 1, 2, 1, 2, 2, 2, and 3, with a mean of 1.9.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * December 14 - 15 -- ARRL 10-Meter Contest (CW, phone)
    * December 14 - 15 -- TRC Digi Contest (Digital)
    * December 14 - 16 -- PODXS 070 Club Triple Play Low Band Sprint
    (Digital)
    * December 15 -- CQC Great Colorado Snowshoe Run (CW)
    * December 16 -- Run for the Bacon QRP Contest (CW)
    * December 18 -- NAQCC CW Sprint

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on amateur radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    Collegiate QSO Party 2018 and 2019 Plaque Recipients Announced

    The ARRL Collegiate Amateur Radio Initiative has announced plaque
    winners from the 2018 and 2019 rounds of the Collegiate QSO Party. They
    are:

    K4FAU Florida Atlantic University Amateur Radio Club, 2018 First Place,
    High Power; W0QQQ Amateur Radio Club at Kansas State University, 2018
    Second Place, High Power; W0YQ University of Colorado Boulder Amateur
    Radio Club, 2018 First Place, Low Power; W0EEE Missouri S&T Amateur
    Radio Club, 2018 Second Place, Low Power; K1EEE, Michael R. Rancourt,
    2018 First Place, Employee, High Power; W4ATL, Sherman Banks, 2018
    First Place, Alumni, High Power; W2RS, Ray Soifer, 2018 First Place,
    Alumni, Low Power; N8FM, Charles S. Romick, 2018 Second Place, Alumni,
    Low Power; K4VBM, Robert G. Hensey, Jr., 2018 First Place, Individual,
    Low Power; N1SOH, Ethan Handwerker, 2018 Second Place, Individual, Low
    Power, and 2019 First Place, Individual (N1SOH, W1FM, ops).

    W1RMC Middlebury College Amateur Radio Club, 2019 First Place, High
    Power; W8LT Student Radio Club of The Ohio State University, 2019 First
    Place, Low Power, and KN4WZX Augusta University Amateur Radio Club,
    2019 Second Place, Low Power.

    Thanks to organizers Andy Milluzzi, KK4LWR, and Tony Milluzzi, KD8RTT.
    The plaques are sponsored by ARRL and the W1YSM Snyder Family
    Collegiate Amateur Radio Endowment Fund, established in 2017. The
    Collegiate QSO Party will return in September 2020.

    Melissa Pore, KM4CZN, is 2020 Carole Perry Educator of the Year Award
    Recipient

    Melissa Pore, KM4CZN, of Vienna, Virginia, is the 2020 recipient of the
    Carole Perry Educator of the Year Award, Orlando HamCation has
    announced. The award, which recognizes outstanding contributions in
    educating and advancing youth in amateur radio, was first awarded last
    year to its namesake, Carole Perry, WB2MGP, in honor of her work
    teaching students about ham radio. Pore is an Amateur Radio on the
    International Space Station (ARISS) Education Committee member and an
    ambassador for the ARISS program.

    An educational professional for more than 20 years, Pore is on the
    staff at Bishop Denis J. O'Connell High School in Arlington, Virginia,
    the site of a November 2018 ARISS contact. In addition to teaching
    engineering and computer science, she is involved in the school's
    amateur radio and engineering clubs. While she was a teacher at St.
    Thomas More Elementary School, Pore was associated with the STMSAT-1
    project. The Earth-observation CubeSat, built entirely by students at
    the school, was launched in 2015 but failed to transmit any images. It
    was the first satellite constructed by elementary schoolers.

    Pore was a cofacilitator of a workshop at the 2019 Space Port Area
    Conference for Educators. Last year, she and her students presented
    during Innovation Day at National Air and Space Museum's Steven F.
    Udvar-Hazy Center. She is a member of AMSAT and the NASA Goddard
    Amateur Radio Club. As an ambassador for the ARISS Education Team, her
    talks and educational outreach have showcased ARISS and the STEM
    activities of her students, several of whom are radio amateurs. She
    assisted with the Dayton Hamvention 2019 ARISS booth and helped staff
    the exhibit at the Space Explorers Education Conference last February
    in Houston, where she's set to present a workshop in 2020.

    At the 2019 Space Port Area Conference for Educators at Cape Kennedy,
    Pore received a plaque from the ISS National Lab Space Station Explorer
    Program citing her "service, commitment, and desire to push the
    boundaries of STEM Education."
    In Brief...

    The theme for the 2020 Dayton Hamvention^(R) will be "Amateur Radio,
    The Future." Hamvention General Chair Jack Gerbs, WB8SCT, invited
    Hamvention attendees to celebrate amateur radio's past, present, and
    future. "As amateur radio operators, we enjoy many modes of operating,"
    Gerbs said. "We also enjoy challenges such as satellite communications,
    moonbounce, meteor scatter, and more. What truly excites me about our
    hobby is the diversity of these modes and the fact that, as we move to
    the future, we still enjoy the technologies of the past." Gerbs noted
    that Hamvention has long been a place to find vintage parts and gear
    and to see the latest technology. "The theme acknowledges the role that
    amateur radio has always played and will continue to play in future
    communication developments," Hamvention said, acknowledging the
    contributions of the many hams who actively work on new ideas,
    equipment designs, and software to improve electronic communication.
    Hamvention 2020 takes place May 15 - 17 at the Greene County
    Fairgrounds and Expo Center in Xenia, Ohio.

    Massachusetts has settled on a one-hand-on-the-wheel rule for mobiles.
    The Bay State's two ARRL Section Managers report they have received
    confirmation that the Commonwealth's distracted driving law does not
    apply to two-way mobile radio operation. The new law "permits use of a
    federally licensed two-way radio, provided that one hand remains on the
    steering wheel at all times," except as provided in sections 8M, 12A,
    and 13B of the law. -- Thanks to Western Massachusetts SM Ray Lajoie,
    KB1LRL, and ARRL Eastern Massachusetts SM Tom Walsh, K1TW

    The Boy Scouts say JOTA station participation was up in 2019. The
    Scouts report that, although overall Jamboree On the Air (JOTA) 2019
    participation was down slightly from 2018, "our calculations show that
    each station averaged an additional 13 people in attendance over 2019.
    This shows an aggregate increase of 24% attendance per station, even
    with our reported stations being down from 266 in 2018 to 201 in 2019."
    The Scouts reported that 13,783 individuals took part in JOTA 2019,
    down from 14,708 in 2018.

    A year-long special event will honor Beethoven. German special event
    station DL250BTHVN will be active between December 16, 2019, and
    December 17, 2020, to honor the 250th anniversary of the birth of famed
    composer Ludwig van Beethoven. The Beethoven anniversary year will take
    place under the auspices of Germany's Federal President Frank-Walter
    Steinmeier. Beethoven was born in December 1770 in Bonn, Germany, and
    lived there for the first 22 years of his life. The anniversary event
    is aimed in part at highlighting Beethoven's extensive oeuvre as a
    composer and to boost Bonn's reputation as a "Beethoven city." QSL via
    direct or by the bureau.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * December 13 - 14 -- West Central Florida Section Convention, Plant
    City, Florida
    * January 4 -- New York City-Long Island Section Convention,
    Brookville, New York
    * January 17 - 18 -- North Texas Section Convention, Forest Hill,
    Texas
    * January 19 - 25 -- Quartzfest, Quartzsite, Arizona
    * January 24 - 26 -- Puerto Rico State Convention, Hatillo, Puerto
    Rico
    * January 25 -- ARRL Midwest Conference, Collinsville, Illinois

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

    .

    .
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    Free of charge to ARRL members...
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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
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    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Dec 20 09:05:02 2019
    The ARRL Letter
    December 19, 2019

    * ARRL Reshapes Podcast Offerings for 2020
    * FCC Formally opts Proposals to Remove Amateur 3 GHz Band, Invites
    Comments
    * FCC Proposes Largest-Ever Fine for Unlicensed Broadcasting
    * The Doctor Will See You Now!
    * AztechSat-1 CubeSat to Demonstrate Intra-Satellite Communication
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * Volunteers Celebrate 98th Anniversary of ARRL Transatlantic Tests
    at W1AW
    * NTIA Spectrum Manager Stephen Veader, N4DXS, SK
    * Bar Code Lead Developer George Laurer, K4HZE, SK
    * In Brief...
    * Getting It Right!
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    To Our Readers: This is the final edition of The ARRL Letter for 2019.
    The newsletter will be on a holiday hiatus until January 9, 2020. ARRL
    Audio News will be on break until January 10, 2020. ARRL Headquarters
    will be closed on December 25 and on January 1, and there will be no
    W1AW bulletin or code practice transmissions on those days. A reminder
    that Straight Key Night (SKN) is January 1, 2020 (UTC) -- starting on
    New Year's Eve in North American time zones. We wish everyone a safe
    and enjoyable holiday season.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL Reshapes Podcast Offerings for 2020

    In conjunction with the launch of its new On the Air magazine, which is
    aimed at those just beginning their journey in amateur radio, ARRL is
    reconfiguring its podcast lineup.

    Heading up the new schedule will be a free companion podcast to the
    bimonthly On the Air magazine. The monthly On the Air podcast will take
    a deeper look into select features and projects from the magazine. Each
    month, host and On the Air Editorial Director Becky Schoenfeld, W1BXY,
    will offer additional resources, techniques, and hints to help
    less-experienced radio amateurs to get the most from the magazine's
    content.

    In addition to the podcast, ARRL Product Development Manager Bob
    Inderbitzen, NQ1R, will curate a free On the Air blog featuring content
    from the communicators and makers who are the driving force of amateur
    radio today. The blog will highlight opportunities and activities
    available to new licensees. The On the Air blog is intended as an entry
    point into the world of amateur radio for those seeking original voices
    and perspectives. Readers will be invited to take part in the
    conversation by sharing their stories and experiences.

    ARRL's current So Now What? podcast will cease production in January,
    as the full complement of On the Air content is rolled out. The catalog
    of So Now What? episodes is available for listening or downloading.

    In addition, The Doctor is In podcast, which has served
    more-experienced amateurs since 2016, will conclude its 4-year run with
    its December 19 episode. Eclectic Tech, a new biweekly podcast designed
    to appeal to experienced amateurs, will launch in February.

    Hosted by QST Editor Steve Ford, WB8IMY, Eclectic Tech will highlight
    technical topics involving amateur and non-amateur technology, offer
    brief interviews with individuals involved in projects of interest to
    amateurs, and include practical information of immediate benefit to
    today's hams.

    The Doctor is In co-host Joel Hallas, W1ZR, is selecting some of his
    favorite podcast episodes for re-broadcast in the interim between the
    end of production for The Doctor is In and the debut of Eclectic Tech.
    The complete The Doctor is In archive is available on the ARRL website.
    Hallas will continue to answer questions about amateur radio in QST's
    "The Doctor is In" column.

    The ARRL Audio News podcast will continue to provide a weekly summary
    of news and activities within the amateur radio community.
    FCC Formally opts Proposals to Remove Amateur 3 GHz Band, Invites
    Comments

    The FCC's plan to remove "existing non-federal secondary radiolocation
    and amateur allocations" in the 3.3 - 3.55 GHz band and relocate
    incumbent non-federal operations already has begun drawing fire. The
    Commission formally adopted the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) in
    WT Docket 19-348 on December 12 and invited comments on appropriate
    "transition mechanisms" to make the spectrum available for mobile and
    fixed wireless broadband use. ARRL plans to oppose the move. The
    amateur 9-centimeter allocation is 3.3 - 3.5 GHz.

    "By proposing to delete the existing non-federal secondary allocations
    from the 3.3 - 3.55 GHz band, we are taking an important initial step
    towards satisfying Congress's directives and making as much as 250
    megahertz of spectrum potentially available for advanced wireless
    services, including 5G," the FCC said in the Introduction to its NPRM.

    Some comments arrived before formal adoption of the NPRM, which was
    circulated ahead of the December meeting. Kevin Milner, KD0MA, the
    secretary/treasurer of the Ski Country Amateur Radio Club in Colorado,
    argued that the club's equipment cannot be re-channeled below 3.4 GHz,
    and the club is seeking relocation costs. Devin Ulibarri, W7ND, told
    the FCC that amateur networks in the current band cannot move easily
    into other amateur allocations because there is no readily available
    commercial equipment to support the bandwidth, the FCC said in a
    footnote.

    Currently, the entire 3.1 - 3.55 GHz band is allocated for both federal
    and non-federal radiolocation services, with non-federal users
    operating on a secondary basis to federal radiolocation services.

    With respect to amateur operations, the FCC invited comments on whether
    sufficient amateur spectrum exists in other bands that can support the
    operations currently conducted at 3.3 - 3.5 GHz. The 3.40 - 3.41 GHz
    segment is earmarked for amateur satellite communication. The FCC said
    if non-federal licensees are relocated to the 3.1 - 3.3 GHz band, it
    proposes to have them continue to operate on a secondary basis to
    federal operations, consistent with current band allocations.

    Also at its December 12 meeting, the FCC considered another NPRM in WT
    Docket 19-138 that would "take a fresh and comprehensive look" at the
    rules for the 5.9 GHz band and propose, among other things, to make the
    lower 45 MHz of the band available for unlicensed operations and to
    permit "cellular vehicle-to-everything" (C-V2X) operations in the upper
    20 MHz of the band. The FCC is not proposing to delete or otherwise
    amend the 5-centimeter amateur 5.650 - 5.925 GHz allocation, which
    would continue as secondary. The NPRM, if approved, would address the
    top 75 MHz of that amateur secondary band. Although no changes are
    proposed to the amateur allocation, an anticipated increase in primary
    use could restrict secondary amateur use.

    The Amateur Radio Emergency Data Network (AREDN) has offered its voice
    in challenging the FCC proposals on both 9 and 5 centimeters, saying
    their adoption would "eliminate our use of the most-effective resource
    hams have to build its networks."

    "The AREDN Project is able to leverage low-cost commercial devices
    solely because they are designed to operate on adjacent allocations,"
    AREDN said on its website. "Moving to other allocations would be
    difficult if not impossible without a complete redesign, manufacture,
    purchase, and installation of new custom amateur hardware and
    software...raising the price out of reach for the typical ham."

    FCC Proposes Largest-Ever Fine for Unlicensed Broadcasting

    The FCC has proposed fining an alleged pirate broadcaster in the
    Boston, Massachusetts area more than $450,000. According to the FCC,
    Gerlens Cesar, who operated Radio TeleBoston, used three separate
    transmitters for his broadcasting enterprise, resulting in three
    separate violations of the law.

    "The Commission proposed imposing the statutory maximum forfeiture
    amount for each of these three apparent violations," the FCC said in a
    Notice of Apparent Liability (NAL) released on December 12. Under the
    Communications Act, it is illegal to transmit above certain low-power
    levels, defined within FCC Part 15 rules, without an FCC license.

    "Such pirate radio broadcasting can interfere with licensed
    communications including public safety transmissions," the FCC said.
    The FCC said Cesar apparently simulcasts Radio TeleBoston on three
    unauthorized transmitters on two different frequencies. "His operation
    thus had the potential to cause interference in various locations in
    and around Boston and at different channels on the FM dial," the FCC
    said. "As a result of the scale of this operation, its potential
    impacts, and its continuous nature, the Commission proposed the maximum
    penalty for all three transmitters."

    The FCC reported receiving complaints from Boston-area residents of an
    illegal station operating at both 90.1 and 92.1 MHz. One complaint
    identified Cesar as the operator of Radio TeleBoston. The FCC said it
    had issued multiple warnings. -- FCC Media Release
    The Doctor Will See You Now!

    The Doctor will open the mailbag for the last time in the final
    (December 19) episode of the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast. "Best of
    The Doctor is In" episodes will be released every other week until a
    new podcast, Electic Tech," debuts in February.

    Sponsored by DX Engineering, ARRL The Doctor is In is an informative
    discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet, or
    smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like!

    Every 2 weeks since 2016, your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve Ford,
    WB8IMY, and the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, have discussed a
    broad range of technical topics and answered listeners' questions.

    Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone or
    iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can also
    listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration required,
    or browse the site as a guest) and through the free Stitcher app for
    iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never listened to a podcast
    before, download our beginner's guide.

    AztechSat-1 CubeSat to Demonstrate Intra-Satellite Communication

    The AztechSat-1 CubeSat, which traveled to the International Space
    Station (ISS) earlier this month on the 19th Space-X Commercial
    Resupply Services (CRS-19) mission for NASA, will listen for emergency
    messages in the 439 MHz range and retransmit them for amateur radio
    operators to copy on its 437.300 MHz downlink using the Winlink
    protocol, once the CubeSat has been placed into orbit. The satellite is
    a project of Mexico's Universidad Popular Aut¢noma del Estado de Puebla
    (UPAEP). Aztechsat-1 is set for deployment from the ISS in late
    January.

    "The primary objective of the project is to establish communication
    with the commercial GlobalStar satellites in order to improve data
    transmission to Earth," a UPAEP news release said. AztechSat-1 will
    create a saturation map of 435 - 438 MHz by listening for the whole
    orbit and returning captured data to the ground station on the 437.300
    MHz amateur radio downlink (9k6 GMSK or FSK) plus a 1600 MHz GlobalStar
    link. Emergency messages received via Globalstar to the AztechSat-1
    ground station will be shared on the project's website.

    A certificate will be available for amateur stations receiving the
    emergency message(s) and reporting these for confirmation by the
    AztechSat-1 team.

    Details are on the AztechSat-1 website and on the IARU Amateur Radio
    Satellite Communication page.

    The project is part of NASA's CubeSat Launch Initiative, which offers
    universities, high schools, and nonprofit organizations the opportunity
    to fly small satellites. "Innovative technology partnerships keep down
    the cost, providing students a way to obtain hands-on experience
    developing flight hardware," a NASA report said.

    NASA explained, "The investigation demonstrates communication within a
    satellite network in low-Earth orbit. Such intra-satellite
    communication could reduce the need for ground stations, lowering the
    cost and increasing the number of data downloads possible for satellite
    applications."
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: It's been 36 consecutive days with no
    sunspots. Geomagnetic conditions were quiet until a minor solar wind
    stream hit on December 18, driving the planetary A index to 13 from the
    low single digits earlier in the week.

    The average planetary A index for December 12 - 18 rose to 4.6, from
    3.7 over the previous 7 days, while mid-latitude A index increased from
    1.9 to 4. Predicted solar flux over the next 45 days is 70. The
    predicted planetary A index is 10, 8, and 8 on December 19 - 21; 5 on
    December 22 - January 4; 8 on January 5; 5 on January 6 - 8; 8 on
    January 9 - 10; 5 on January 11 - 13; 12 on January 14; 10 on January
    15 - 17; 5 on January 18 - 31, and 8 on February 1.

    Because of weak solar activity, the ARRL 10 Meter Contest last weekend
    was rather slow. QST's "The World Above 50 MHz" editor Jon Jones, N0JK,
    in Kansas said he encountered a strong opening to Argentina and Chile
    on Sunday. He said the propagation mechanism appeared to be sporadic E.
    More details in the weekly bulletin on December 20.

    Sunspot numbers for December 12 - 18 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0, with
    a mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 70.5, 68.9, 70.3, 71, 70,
    70.5, and 70.2, with a mean of 70.2. Estimated planetary A indices were
    4, 4, 3, 5, 1, 2, and 13, with a mean of 4.6. Middle latitude A index
    was 3, 3, 2, 5, 1, 2, and 12, with a mean of 4.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * December 20 -- AGB-Party Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * December 20 -- Russian 160-Meter Contest (CW, phone)
    * December 21 -- Feld Hell Sprint
    * December 21 -- OK DX RTTY Contest
    * December 21 - 22 -- Padang DX Contest (Phone)
    * December 21 - 22 -- Gedebage CW Contest
    * December 21 - 22 -- Croatian CW Contest
    * December 22 -- RAEM Contest (CW)
    * December 22 -- ARRL Rookie Roundup, CW
    * December 25 -- SKCC Sprint (CW)
    * December 26 -- DARC Christmas Contest (CW, phone)
    * December 28 -- RAC Winter Contest (CW, phone)
    * December 28 - 29 -- 1.8 Stew Perry Topband Challenge (CW)
    * December 28 - 29 -- Original QRP Contest (CW)
    * December 30 - 31 -- QCX Challenge (CW)
    * December 31 -- Bogor Old and New Contest (Phone)
    * January 1 -- Straight Key Night
    * January 1 -- AGB New Year Snowball Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * January 1 -- SARTG New Year RTTY Contest
    * January 1 -- AGCW Happy New Year Contest (CW)
    * January 1 -- AGCW VHF/UHF Contest (CW)
    * January 1 -- QRP ARCI New Year's Sprint (CW)
    * January 1 -- 3.5 UKEICC 80-Meter Contest (Phone)
    * January 2 -- NRAU 10-Meter Activity Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * January 2 -- SKCC Sprint Europe (CW)
    * January 4 -- ARRL Kids Day (Phone)
    * January 4 -- PODXS 070 Club PSKFest (Digital)
    * January 4 -- RSGB AFS Contest, CW
    * January 4 - 5 -- WW PMC Contest (CW, phone)
    * January 4 - 5 -- ARRL RTTY Roundup
    * January 4 - 5 -- EUCW 160-Meter Contest (CW)
    * January 6 - 12 -- All IQRP Quarterly Marathon (CW, phone, digital)
    * January 7 -- ARS Spartan Sprint (CW)
    * January 8 - 12 -- AWA Linc Cundall Memorial CW Contest

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on amateur radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    Volunteers Celebrate 98th Anniversary of ARRL Transatlantic Tests at
    W1AW

    A group of radio amateurs gathered on December 11 at W1AW to mark the
    98th anniversary of the successful ARRL Transatlantic Tests. On
    December 11, 1921, a message transmitted by a group of Radio Club of
    America members at 1BCG in Greenwich, Connecticut, was copied by Paul
    Godley, 2ZE, in Scotland. Reporting on the accomplishment, ARRL
    Secretary Kenneth B. Warner, 1EH, declared "Excelsior!" Clark Burgard,
    N1BCG -- who lives in Greenwich and styles his call sign as "n1BCG" to
    honor the original 1BCG -- was among those on hand at the Maxim
    Memorial Station.

    Those pitching in to take part in
    the day-long anniversary celebration
    included (L-R) Michael Pfaeffle,
    K3FEF; Lisa Kress; Brian Kress,
    KB3WFV; Bob Allison, WB1GCM; Blaine
    Morin, N1GTU, and Clark Burgard,
    N1BCG. Not shown are Chris Codella,
    W2PA; Glenn Cooper, W2BK, and Greg
    Fiozzo, KD2HRD.

    "We completed a successful special event yesterday at W1AW
    commemorating the 98th anniversary of the Transatlantic Tests," Burgard
    recounted. "This was particularly important historically to amateur
    radio as it was originally organized by ARRL in 1921 to determine if
    low-power amateur radio stations using shortwave frequencies could
    actually be heard in Europe. Until then, it was thought impossible."

    Burgard pointed out that the 1921 event changed radio history, was
    covered in three issues of QST, and opened the door to the first
    two-way transatlantic tests a couple of years later. The 1921
    transatlantic success marked the beginning of what would become routine
    communication between US radio amateurs and those in other parts of the
    world -- literally the birth of DX.

    NTIA Spectrum Manager Stephen Veader, N4DXS, SK

    Stephen Veader, N4DXS, of Dale City, Virginia, a major
    behind-the-scenes player in the effort that led to creation of amateur
    radio's 60-meter band in the US, died on November 5. An ARRL Life
    Member, he was 67.

    As a spectrum manager for the National Telecommunications and
    Information ministration (NTIA), Veader was deeply involved on the
    behalf of NTIA in the effort to secure a new amateur band at 5 MHz.
    According to Ross Merlin, WA2WDT, when it became clear that a proposal
    for a 15 kHz band would not be approved, Veader was instrumental in
    fashioning the compromise that led to the authorization of the five
    discrete secondary channels radio amateurs have today, and other
    countries copied that template for their 5 MHz amateur allocations.
    Today, these spot frequencies serve as "interoperability channels" for
    federal and amateur stations to share in emergencies and exercises.

    Veader was active within the SHARES HF radio community as the
    representative for NTIA. A native of Boston, Veader was a US Air Force
    veteran. During his years at NTIA, he also provided regulatory guidance
    on the use of SHARES for federal and non-federal radio users.

    "Steve was a good friend to SHARES and to amateur radio," Merlin said.
    Veader was also an avid RTTY enthusiast and was active in many contests
    throughout the year. A service was held on November 15. -- Thanks to
    Ross Merlin, WA2WDT
    Bar Code Lead Developer George Laurer, K4HZE, SK

    The lead developer of the bar code system that became the
    now-ubiquitous Universal Product Code (UPC), George Laurer, K4HZE, of
    Wendell, North Carolina, died on December 5. He was 94. While an
    electrical engineer with IBM in North Carolina's Research Triangle Park
    in the early 1970s, Laurer led the effort to develop the bar code
    system. The UPC, composed of 30 unique black bars and a 12-digit
    number, allows retailers to identify products and prices as they are
    scanned. It was used for the first time in a retail setting in 1974.

    Laurer also later patented one of the first handheld UPC scanners,
    according to his obituary. As The Washington Post reported, "The
    bar-code concept had originated in the 1940s, when N. Joseph Woodland
    designed a bull's eye-shaped system of concentric circles, inspired by
    the dots and dashes of Morse code." Woodland became a colleague of
    Laurer's at IBM, and Laurer considered him "the father of the
    supermarket scanning system."

    A native of New York, Laurer served in the US Army during World War II
    after being drafted while he was still a junior in high school. He
    graduated from the University of Maryland in 1951 and spent 3 decades
    working for IBM. Accounts describe Laurer as an inveterate tinkerer,
    even up to his final years.

    IBM never patented the bar code system, but made it publicly available
    in order to sell the associated hardware.
    In Brief...

    Kids Day is Saturday, January 4 The first Saturday in January is Kids
    Day -- the time to get youngsters on the air to share in the joy and
    fun that amateur radio can provide. Kids Day gets under way on
    Saturday, January 4, at 1800 UTC and concludes at 2359 UTC. Sponsored
    by the Boring (Oregon) Amateur Radio Club, this event has a simple
    exchange, suitable for younger operators: First name, age, location,
    and favorite color. After that, the contact can be as long or as short
    as each participant prefers. Kids Day is the perfect opportunity to
    open your shack door and invite kids over to see what amateur radio has
    to offer. Details are on the ARRL website.

    ARRL Lifelong Learning Manager to Keynote Ham Radio University 2020 in
    January ARRL Lifelong Learning Manager Kris Bickell, K1BIC, will be the
    keynote speaker at Ham Radio University 2020 (HRU 2020). The annual
    event, now in its 21st year, will take place on Saturday, January 4, in
    the Hillwood Commons Student Center at Long Island University-Post, 720
    Northern Blvd., Brookville, New York. HRU 2020 is billed as, "A day of
    education to share ideas, experiences, knowledge, and fellowship among
    amateur radio operators." Doors open at 7:30 AM. A Newcomer's Meeting
    and HRU Orientation, geared toward first-time visitors, gets under way
    at 8:30 AM. Thirty forums are on the schedule, with topics such as
    typical HF antennas, ham radio logging programs, satellite operation,
    and more. Hands-on workshops will cover such topics as cables and
    connectors and electronic test equipment. mission is free, although a
    $5 donation is suggested. Special event station W2HRU will be on the
    air. Amateur radio license examinations will be given starting at 1:30
    PM. Food and refreshments will be available.

    SAQ, Sweden's Alexanderson Alternator, Announces Scheduled Christmas
    Eve Transmission SAQ, the call sign of the 1920s vintage Alexanderson
    transmitter in Grimeton, Sweden, is set to be on the air for its annual
    Christmas Eve transmission. SAQ transmits CW with up to 200 kW on 17.2
    kHz. Tune-up is scheduled to begin at around 0730 UTC, with the holiday
    message transmitted at 0800 UTC. SAQ will livestream the event. SAQ has
    introduced a new reception report form for listeners and has asked
    listeners not to send SAQ reception reports via email. The SK6SAQ
    amateur radio station will be active on 7.035 kHz and 14.035 MHz CW or
    3.755 MHz SSB, with two stations on the air most of the time. Given its
    age, the Alexanderson alternator does not always function as intended.
    The transmitter experienced a failure during its scheduled UN Day
    transmission on October 24.

    FCC Invites Comments on Digital AM Broadcasting Proposal The FCC has
    invited comments on a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM), that would
    allow AM broadcasters to transmit an all-digital signal using the HD
    Radio in-band on-channel (IBOC) mode, known as MA3.1. "We tentatively
    conclude that a voluntary transition to all-digital broadcasting has
    the potential to benefit AM stations and provide improved AM service to
    the listening public," the FCC said. "We seek comments on proposed
    operating standards for all-digital stations and the impact of such
    operations on existing analog stations and listeners." The proceeding
    was initiated by a March 2019 Petition for Rulemaking (Petition) filed
    by Bryan Broadcasting Corporation. "This proceeding continues the
    Commission's efforts to improve and update the AM radio service to
    provide a better listening experience for consumers and enhanced
    service offerings, as part of our continuing effort to revitalize AM
    broadcasting," the FCC said in the introduction to the NPRM. Comments
    are due 60 days after the NPRM appears in The Federal Register.
    Getting It Right!

    In the article, "Collegiate QSO Party 2018 and 2019 Plaque Recipients
    Announced," the 2018 second-place alumni low-power winner was
    incorrect. The winner was Frank J. Maynard, NF8M.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * January 4 -- New York City-Long Island Section Convention,
    Brookville, New York
    * January 17 - 18 -- North Texas Section Convention, Forest Hill,
    Texas
    * January 19 - 25 -- Quartzfest, Quartzsite, Arizona
    * January 24 - 26 -- Puerto Rico State Convention, Hatillo, Puerto
    Rico
    * January 25 -- ARRL Midwest Conference, Collinsville, Illinois

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

    .

    .
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    Subscribe to...
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    Free of charge to ARRL members...
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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
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    purposes require written permission.


    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Dec 27 09:05:18 2019
    The ARRL Letter
    December 19, 2019

    * ARRL Reshapes Podcast Offerings for 2020
    * FCC Formally opts Proposals to Remove Amateur 3 GHz Band, Invites
    Comments
    * FCC Proposes Largest-Ever Fine for Unlicensed Broadcasting
    * The Doctor Will See You Now!
    * AztechSat-1 CubeSat to Demonstrate Intra-Satellite Communication
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * Volunteers Celebrate 98th Anniversary of ARRL Transatlantic Tests
    at W1AW
    * NTIA Spectrum Manager Stephen Veader, N4DXS, SK
    * Bar Code Lead Developer George Laurer, K4HZE, SK
    * In Brief...
    * Getting It Right!
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    To Our Readers: This is the final edition of The ARRL Letter for 2019.
    The newsletter will be on a holiday hiatus until January 9, 2020. ARRL
    Audio News will be on break until January 10, 2020. ARRL Headquarters
    will be closed on December 25 and on January 1, and there will be no
    W1AW bulletin or code practice transmissions on those days. A reminder
    that Straight Key Night (SKN) is January 1, 2020 (UTC) -- starting on
    New Year's Eve in North American time zones. We wish everyone a safe
    and enjoyable holiday season.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL Reshapes Podcast Offerings for 2020

    In conjunction with the launch of its new On the Air magazine, which is
    aimed at those just beginning their journey in amateur radio, ARRL is
    reconfiguring its podcast lineup.

    Heading up the new schedule will be a free companion podcast to the
    bimonthly On the Air magazine. The monthly On the Air podcast will take
    a deeper look into select features and projects from the magazine. Each
    month, host and On the Air Editorial Director Becky Schoenfeld, W1BXY,
    will offer additional resources, techniques, and hints to help
    less-experienced radio amateurs to get the most from the magazine's
    content.

    In addition to the podcast, ARRL Product Development Manager Bob
    Inderbitzen, NQ1R, will curate a free On the Air blog featuring content
    from the communicators and makers who are the driving force of amateur
    radio today. The blog will highlight opportunities and activities
    available to new licensees. The On the Air blog is intended as an entry
    point into the world of amateur radio for those seeking original voices
    and perspectives. Readers will be invited to take part in the
    conversation by sharing their stories and experiences.

    ARRL's current So Now What? podcast will cease production in January,
    as the full complement of On the Air content is rolled out. The catalog
    of So Now What? episodes is available for listening or downloading.

    In addition, The Doctor is In podcast, which has served
    more-experienced amateurs since 2016, will conclude its 4-year run with
    its December 19 episode. Eclectic Tech, a new biweekly podcast designed
    to appeal to experienced amateurs, will launch in February.

    Hosted by QST Editor Steve Ford, WB8IMY, Eclectic Tech will highlight
    technical topics involving amateur and non-amateur technology, offer
    brief interviews with individuals involved in projects of interest to
    amateurs, and include practical information of immediate benefit to
    today's hams.

    The Doctor is In co-host Joel Hallas, W1ZR, is selecting some of his
    favorite podcast episodes for re-broadcast in the interim between the
    end of production for The Doctor is In and the debut of Eclectic Tech.
    The complete The Doctor is In archive is available on the ARRL website.
    Hallas will continue to answer questions about amateur radio in QST's
    "The Doctor is In" column.

    The ARRL Audio News podcast will continue to provide a weekly summary
    of news and activities within the amateur radio community.
    FCC Formally opts Proposals to Remove Amateur 3 GHz Band, Invites
    Comments

    The FCC's plan to remove "existing non-federal secondary radiolocation
    and amateur allocations" in the 3.3 - 3.55 GHz band and relocate
    incumbent non-federal operations already has begun drawing fire. The
    Commission formally adopted the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) in
    WT Docket 19-348 on December 12 and invited comments on appropriate
    "transition mechanisms" to make the spectrum available for mobile and
    fixed wireless broadband use. ARRL plans to oppose the move. The
    amateur 9-centimeter allocation is 3.3 - 3.5 GHz.

    "By proposing to delete the existing non-federal secondary allocations
    from the 3.3 - 3.55 GHz band, we are taking an important initial step
    towards satisfying Congress's directives and making as much as 250
    megahertz of spectrum potentially available for advanced wireless
    services, including 5G," the FCC said in the Introduction to its NPRM.

    Some comments arrived before formal adoption of the NPRM, which was
    circulated ahead of the December meeting. Kevin Milner, KD0MA, the
    secretary/treasurer of the Ski Country Amateur Radio Club in Colorado,
    argued that the club's equipment cannot be re-channeled below 3.4 GHz,
    and the club is seeking relocation costs. Devin Ulibarri, W7ND, told
    the FCC that amateur networks in the current band cannot move easily
    into other amateur allocations because there is no readily available
    commercial equipment to support the bandwidth, the FCC said in a
    footnote.

    Currently, the entire 3.1 - 3.55 GHz band is allocated for both federal
    and non-federal radiolocation services, with non-federal users
    operating on a secondary basis to federal radiolocation services.

    With respect to amateur operations, the FCC invited comments on whether
    sufficient amateur spectrum exists in other bands that can support the
    operations currently conducted at 3.3 - 3.5 GHz. The 3.40 - 3.41 GHz
    segment is earmarked for amateur satellite communication. The FCC said
    if non-federal licensees are relocated to the 3.1 - 3.3 GHz band, it
    proposes to have them continue to operate on a secondary basis to
    federal operations, consistent with current band allocations.

    Also at its December 12 meeting, the FCC considered another NPRM in WT
    Docket 19-138 that would "take a fresh and comprehensive look" at the
    rules for the 5.9 GHz band and propose, among other things, to make the
    lower 45 MHz of the band available for unlicensed operations and to
    permit "cellular vehicle-to-everything" (C-V2X) operations in the upper
    20 MHz of the band. The FCC is not proposing to delete or otherwise
    amend the 5-centimeter amateur 5.650 - 5.925 GHz allocation, which
    would continue as secondary. The NPRM, if approved, would address the
    top 75 MHz of that amateur secondary band. Although no changes are
    proposed to the amateur allocation, an anticipated increase in primary
    use could restrict secondary amateur use.

    The Amateur Radio Emergency Data Network (AREDN) has offered its voice
    in challenging the FCC proposals on both 9 and 5 centimeters, saying
    their adoption would "eliminate our use of the most-effective resource
    hams have to build its networks."

    "The AREDN Project is able to leverage low-cost commercial devices
    solely because they are designed to operate on adjacent allocations,"
    AREDN said on its website. "Moving to other allocations would be
    difficult if not impossible without a complete redesign, manufacture,
    purchase, and installation of new custom amateur hardware and
    software...raising the price out of reach for the typical ham."

    FCC Proposes Largest-Ever Fine for Unlicensed Broadcasting

    The FCC has proposed fining an alleged pirate broadcaster in the
    Boston, Massachusetts area more than $450,000. According to the FCC,
    Gerlens Cesar, who operated Radio TeleBoston, used three separate
    transmitters for his broadcasting enterprise, resulting in three
    separate violations of the law.

    "The Commission proposed imposing the statutory maximum forfeiture
    amount for each of these three apparent violations," the FCC said in a
    Notice of Apparent Liability (NAL) released on December 12. Under the
    Communications Act, it is illegal to transmit above certain low-power
    levels, defined within FCC Part 15 rules, without an FCC license.

    "Such pirate radio broadcasting can interfere with licensed
    communications including public safety transmissions," the FCC said.
    The FCC said Cesar apparently simulcasts Radio TeleBoston on three
    unauthorized transmitters on two different frequencies. "His operation
    thus had the potential to cause interference in various locations in
    and around Boston and at different channels on the FM dial," the FCC
    said. "As a result of the scale of this operation, its potential
    impacts, and its continuous nature, the Commission proposed the maximum
    penalty for all three transmitters."

    The FCC reported receiving complaints from Boston-area residents of an
    illegal station operating at both 90.1 and 92.1 MHz. One complaint
    identified Cesar as the operator of Radio TeleBoston. The FCC said it
    had issued multiple warnings. -- FCC Media Release
    The Doctor Will See You Now!

    The Doctor will open the mailbag for the last time in the final
    (December 19) episode of the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast. "Best of
    The Doctor is In" episodes will be released every other week until a
    new podcast, Electic Tech," debuts in February.

    Sponsored by DX Engineering, ARRL The Doctor is In is an informative
    discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet, or
    smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like!

    Every 2 weeks since 2016, your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve Ford,
    WB8IMY, and the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, have discussed a
    broad range of technical topics and answered listeners' questions.

    Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone or
    iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can also
    listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration required,
    or browse the site as a guest) and through the free Stitcher app for
    iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never listened to a podcast
    before, download our beginner's guide.

    AztechSat-1 CubeSat to Demonstrate Intra-Satellite Communication

    The AztechSat-1 CubeSat, which traveled to the International Space
    Station (ISS) earlier this month on the 19th Space-X Commercial
    Resupply Services (CRS-19) mission for NASA, will listen for emergency
    messages in the 439 MHz range and retransmit them for amateur radio
    operators to copy on its 437.300 MHz downlink using the Winlink
    protocol, once the CubeSat has been placed into orbit. The satellite is
    a project of Mexico's Universidad Popular Aut¢noma del Estado de Puebla
    (UPAEP). Aztechsat-1 is set for deployment from the ISS in late
    January.

    "The primary objective of the project is to establish communication
    with the commercial GlobalStar satellites in order to improve data
    transmission to Earth," a UPAEP news release said. AztechSat-1 will
    create a saturation map of 435 - 438 MHz by listening for the whole
    orbit and returning captured data to the ground station on the 437.300
    MHz amateur radio downlink (9k6 GMSK or FSK) plus a 1600 MHz GlobalStar
    link. Emergency messages received via Globalstar to the AztechSat-1
    ground station will be shared on the project's website.

    A certificate will be available for amateur stations receiving the
    emergency message(s) and reporting these for confirmation by the
    AztechSat-1 team.

    Details are on the AztechSat-1 website and on the IARU Amateur Radio
    Satellite Communication page.

    The project is part of NASA's CubeSat Launch Initiative, which offers
    universities, high schools, and nonprofit organizations the opportunity
    to fly small satellites. "Innovative technology partnerships keep down
    the cost, providing students a way to obtain hands-on experience
    developing flight hardware," a NASA report said.

    NASA explained, "The investigation demonstrates communication within a
    satellite network in low-Earth orbit. Such intra-satellite
    communication could reduce the need for ground stations, lowering the
    cost and increasing the number of data downloads possible for satellite
    applications."
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: It's been 36 consecutive days with no
    sunspots. Geomagnetic conditions were quiet until a minor solar wind
    stream hit on December 18, driving the planetary A index to 13 from the
    low single digits earlier in the week.

    The average planetary A index for December 12 - 18 rose to 4.6, from
    3.7 over the previous 7 days, while mid-latitude A index increased from
    1.9 to 4. Predicted solar flux over the next 45 days is 70. The
    predicted planetary A index is 10, 8, and 8 on December 19 - 21; 5 on
    December 22 - January 4; 8 on January 5; 5 on January 6 - 8; 8 on
    January 9 - 10; 5 on January 11 - 13; 12 on January 14; 10 on January
    15 - 17; 5 on January 18 - 31, and 8 on February 1.

    Because of weak solar activity, the ARRL 10 Meter Contest last weekend
    was rather slow. QST's "The World Above 50 MHz" editor Jon Jones, N0JK,
    in Kansas said he encountered a strong opening to Argentina and Chile
    on Sunday. He said the propagation mechanism appeared to be sporadic E.
    More details in the weekly bulletin on December 20.

    Sunspot numbers for December 12 - 18 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0, with
    a mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 70.5, 68.9, 70.3, 71, 70,
    70.5, and 70.2, with a mean of 70.2. Estimated planetary A indices were
    4, 4, 3, 5, 1, 2, and 13, with a mean of 4.6. Middle latitude A index
    was 3, 3, 2, 5, 1, 2, and 12, with a mean of 4.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * December 20 -- AGB-Party Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * December 20 -- Russian 160-Meter Contest (CW, phone)
    * December 21 -- Feld Hell Sprint
    * December 21 -- OK DX RTTY Contest
    * December 21 - 22 -- Padang DX Contest (Phone)
    * December 21 - 22 -- Gedebage CW Contest
    * December 21 - 22 -- Croatian CW Contest
    * December 22 -- RAEM Contest (CW)
    * December 22 -- ARRL Rookie Roundup, CW
    * December 25 -- SKCC Sprint (CW)
    * December 26 -- DARC Christmas Contest (CW, phone)
    * December 28 -- RAC Winter Contest (CW, phone)
    * December 28 - 29 -- 1.8 Stew Perry Topband Challenge (CW)
    * December 28 - 29 -- Original QRP Contest (CW)
    * December 30 - 31 -- QCX Challenge (CW)
    * December 31 -- Bogor Old and New Contest (Phone)
    * January 1 -- Straight Key Night
    * January 1 -- AGB New Year Snowball Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * January 1 -- SARTG New Year RTTY Contest
    * January 1 -- AGCW Happy New Year Contest (CW)
    * January 1 -- AGCW VHF/UHF Contest (CW)
    * January 1 -- QRP ARCI New Year's Sprint (CW)
    * January 1 -- 3.5 UKEICC 80-Meter Contest (Phone)
    * January 2 -- NRAU 10-Meter Activity Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * January 2 -- SKCC Sprint Europe (CW)
    * January 4 -- ARRL Kids Day (Phone)
    * January 4 -- PODXS 070 Club PSKFest (Digital)
    * January 4 -- RSGB AFS Contest, CW
    * January 4 - 5 -- WW PMC Contest (CW, phone)
    * January 4 - 5 -- ARRL RTTY Roundup
    * January 4 - 5 -- EUCW 160-Meter Contest (CW)
    * January 6 - 12 -- All IQRP Quarterly Marathon (CW, phone, digital)
    * January 7 -- ARS Spartan Sprint (CW)
    * January 8 - 12 -- AWA Linc Cundall Memorial CW Contest

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on amateur radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    Volunteers Celebrate 98th Anniversary of ARRL Transatlantic Tests at
    W1AW

    A group of radio amateurs gathered on December 11 at W1AW to mark the
    98th anniversary of the successful ARRL Transatlantic Tests. On
    December 11, 1921, a message transmitted by a group of Radio Club of
    America members at 1BCG in Greenwich, Connecticut, was copied by Paul
    Godley, 2ZE, in Scotland. Reporting on the accomplishment, ARRL
    Secretary Kenneth B. Warner, 1EH, declared "Excelsior!" Clark Burgard,
    N1BCG -- who lives in Greenwich and styles his call sign as "n1BCG" to
    honor the original 1BCG -- was among those on hand at the Maxim
    Memorial Station.

    Those pitching in to take part in
    the day-long anniversary celebration
    included (L-R) Michael Pfaeffle,
    K3FEF; Lisa Kress; Brian Kress,
    KB3WFV; Bob Allison, WB1GCM; Blaine
    Morin, N1GTU, and Clark Burgard,
    N1BCG. Not shown are Chris Codella,
    W2PA; Glenn Cooper, W2BK, and Greg
    Fiozzo, KD2HRD.

    "We completed a successful special event yesterday at W1AW
    commemorating the 98th anniversary of the Transatlantic Tests," Burgard
    recounted. "This was particularly important historically to amateur
    radio as it was originally organized by ARRL in 1921 to determine if
    low-power amateur radio stations using shortwave frequencies could
    actually be heard in Europe. Until then, it was thought impossible."

    Burgard pointed out that the 1921 event changed radio history, was
    covered in three issues of QST, and opened the door to the first
    two-way transatlantic tests a couple of years later. The 1921
    transatlantic success marked the beginning of what would become routine
    communication between US radio amateurs and those in other parts of the
    world -- literally the birth of DX.

    NTIA Spectrum Manager Stephen Veader, N4DXS, SK

    Stephen Veader, N4DXS, of Dale City, Virginia, a major
    behind-the-scenes player in the effort that led to creation of amateur
    radio's 60-meter band in the US, died on November 5. An ARRL Life
    Member, he was 67.

    As a spectrum manager for the National Telecommunications and
    Information ministration (NTIA), Veader was deeply involved on the
    behalf of NTIA in the effort to secure a new amateur band at 5 MHz.
    According to Ross Merlin, WA2WDT, when it became clear that a proposal
    for a 15 kHz band would not be approved, Veader was instrumental in
    fashioning the compromise that led to the authorization of the five
    discrete secondary channels radio amateurs have today, and other
    countries copied that template for their 5 MHz amateur allocations.
    Today, these spot frequencies serve as "interoperability channels" for
    federal and amateur stations to share in emergencies and exercises.

    Veader was active within the SHARES HF radio community as the
    representative for NTIA. A native of Boston, Veader was a US Air Force
    veteran. During his years at NTIA, he also provided regulatory guidance
    on the use of SHARES for federal and non-federal radio users.

    "Steve was a good friend to SHARES and to amateur radio," Merlin said.
    Veader was also an avid RTTY enthusiast and was active in many contests
    throughout the year. A service was held on November 15. -- Thanks to
    Ross Merlin, WA2WDT
    Bar Code Lead Developer George Laurer, K4HZE, SK

    The lead developer of the bar code system that became the
    now-ubiquitous Universal Product Code (UPC), George Laurer, K4HZE, of
    Wendell, North Carolina, died on December 5. He was 94. While an
    electrical engineer with IBM in North Carolina's Research Triangle Park
    in the early 1970s, Laurer led the effort to develop the bar code
    system. The UPC, composed of 30 unique black bars and a 12-digit
    number, allows retailers to identify products and prices as they are
    scanned. It was used for the first time in a retail setting in 1974.

    Laurer also later patented one of the first handheld UPC scanners,
    according to his obituary. As The Washington Post reported, "The
    bar-code concept had originated in the 1940s, when N. Joseph Woodland
    designed a bull's eye-shaped system of concentric circles, inspired by
    the dots and dashes of Morse code." Woodland became a colleague of
    Laurer's at IBM, and Laurer considered him "the father of the
    supermarket scanning system."

    A native of New York, Laurer served in the US Army during World War II
    after being drafted while he was still a junior in high school. He
    graduated from the University of Maryland in 1951 and spent 3 decades
    working for IBM. Accounts describe Laurer as an inveterate tinkerer,
    even up to his final years.

    IBM never patented the bar code system, but made it publicly available
    in order to sell the associated hardware.
    In Brief...

    Kids Day is Saturday, January 4 The first Saturday in January is Kids
    Day -- the time to get youngsters on the air to share in the joy and
    fun that amateur radio can provide. Kids Day gets under way on
    Saturday, January 4, at 1800 UTC and concludes at 2359 UTC. Sponsored
    by the Boring (Oregon) Amateur Radio Club, this event has a simple
    exchange, suitable for younger operators: First name, age, location,
    and favorite color. After that, the contact can be as long or as short
    as each participant prefers. Kids Day is the perfect opportunity to
    open your shack door and invite kids over to see what amateur radio has
    to offer. Details are on the ARRL website.

    ARRL Lifelong Learning Manager to Keynote Ham Radio University 2020 in
    January ARRL Lifelong Learning Manager Kris Bickell, K1BIC, will be the
    keynote speaker at Ham Radio University 2020 (HRU 2020). The annual
    event, now in its 21st year, will take place on Saturday, January 4, in
    the Hillwood Commons Student Center at Long Island University-Post, 720
    Northern Blvd., Brookville, New York. HRU 2020 is billed as, "A day of
    education to share ideas, experiences, knowledge, and fellowship among
    amateur radio operators." Doors open at 7:30 AM. A Newcomer's Meeting
    and HRU Orientation, geared toward first-time visitors, gets under way
    at 8:30 AM. Thirty forums are on the schedule, with topics such as
    typical HF antennas, ham radio logging programs, satellite operation,
    and more. Hands-on workshops will cover such topics as cables and
    connectors and electronic test equipment. mission is free, although a
    $5 donation is suggested. Special event station W2HRU will be on the
    air. Amateur radio license examinations will be given starting at 1:30
    PM. Food and refreshments will be available.

    SAQ, Sweden's Alexanderson Alternator, Announces Scheduled Christmas
    Eve Transmission SAQ, the call sign of the 1920s vintage Alexanderson
    transmitter in Grimeton, Sweden, is set to be on the air for its annual
    Christmas Eve transmission. SAQ transmits CW with up to 200 kW on 17.2
    kHz. Tune-up is scheduled to begin at around 0730 UTC, with the holiday
    message transmitted at 0800 UTC. SAQ will livestream the event. SAQ has
    introduced a new reception report form for listeners and has asked
    listeners not to send SAQ reception reports via email. The SK6SAQ
    amateur radio station will be active on 7.035 kHz and 14.035 MHz CW or
    3.755 MHz SSB, with two stations on the air most of the time. Given its
    age, the Alexanderson alternator does not always function as intended.
    The transmitter experienced a failure during its scheduled UN Day
    transmission on October 24.

    FCC Invites Comments on Digital AM Broadcasting Proposal The FCC has
    invited comments on a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM), that would
    allow AM broadcasters to transmit an all-digital signal using the HD
    Radio in-band on-channel (IBOC) mode, known as MA3.1. "We tentatively
    conclude that a voluntary transition to all-digital broadcasting has
    the potential to benefit AM stations and provide improved AM service to
    the listening public," the FCC said. "We seek comments on proposed
    operating standards for all-digital stations and the impact of such
    operations on existing analog stations and listeners." The proceeding
    was initiated by a March 2019 Petition for Rulemaking (Petition) filed
    by Bryan Broadcasting Corporation. "This proceeding continues the
    Commission's efforts to improve and update the AM radio service to
    provide a better listening experience for consumers and enhanced
    service offerings, as part of our continuing effort to revitalize AM
    broadcasting," the FCC said in the introduction to the NPRM. Comments
    are due 60 days after the NPRM appears in The Federal Register.
    Getting It Right!

    In the article, "Collegiate QSO Party 2018 and 2019 Plaque Recipients
    Announced," the 2018 second-place alumni low-power winner was
    incorrect. The winner was Frank J. Maynard, NF8M.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * January 4 -- New York City-Long Island Section Convention,
    Brookville, New York
    * January 17 - 18 -- North Texas Section Convention, Forest Hill,
    Texas
    * January 19 - 25 -- Quartzfest, Quartzsite, Arizona
    * January 24 - 26 -- Puerto Rico State Convention, Hatillo, Puerto
    Rico
    * January 25 -- ARRL Midwest Conference, Collinsville, Illinois

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

    .

    .
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    Subscribe to...
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    Free of charge to ARRL members...
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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
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    Copyright (c) 2019 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
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    purposes require written permission.


    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Jan 3 09:05:02 2020
    The ARRL Letter
    December 19, 2019

    * ARRL Reshapes Podcast Offerings for 2020
    * FCC Formally opts Proposals to Remove Amateur 3 GHz Band, Invites
    Comments
    * FCC Proposes Largest-Ever Fine for Unlicensed Broadcasting
    * The Doctor Will See You Now!
    * AztechSat-1 CubeSat to Demonstrate Intra-Satellite Communication
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * Volunteers Celebrate 98th Anniversary of ARRL Transatlantic Tests
    at W1AW
    * NTIA Spectrum Manager Stephen Veader, N4DXS, SK
    * Bar Code Lead Developer George Laurer, K4HZE, SK
    * In Brief...
    * Getting It Right!
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    To Our Readers: This is the final edition of The ARRL Letter for 2019.
    The newsletter will be on a holiday hiatus until January 9, 2020. ARRL
    Audio News will be on break until January 10, 2020. ARRL Headquarters
    will be closed on December 25 and on January 1, and there will be no
    W1AW bulletin or code practice transmissions on those days. A reminder
    that Straight Key Night (SKN) is January 1, 2020 (UTC) -- starting on
    New Year's Eve in North American time zones. We wish everyone a safe
    and enjoyable holiday season.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL Reshapes Podcast Offerings for 2020

    In conjunction with the launch of its new On the Air magazine, which is
    aimed at those just beginning their journey in amateur radio, ARRL is
    reconfiguring its podcast lineup.

    Heading up the new schedule will be a free companion podcast to the
    bimonthly On the Air magazine. The monthly On the Air podcast will take
    a deeper look into select features and projects from the magazine. Each
    month, host and On the Air Editorial Director Becky Schoenfeld, W1BXY,
    will offer additional resources, techniques, and hints to help
    less-experienced radio amateurs to get the most from the magazine's
    content.

    In addition to the podcast, ARRL Product Development Manager Bob
    Inderbitzen, NQ1R, will curate a free On the Air blog featuring content
    from the communicators and makers who are the driving force of amateur
    radio today. The blog will highlight opportunities and activities
    available to new licensees. The On the Air blog is intended as an entry
    point into the world of amateur radio for those seeking original voices
    and perspectives. Readers will be invited to take part in the
    conversation by sharing their stories and experiences.

    ARRL's current So Now What? podcast will cease production in January,
    as the full complement of On the Air content is rolled out. The catalog
    of So Now What? episodes is available for listening or downloading.

    In addition, The Doctor is In podcast, which has served
    more-experienced amateurs since 2016, will conclude its 4-year run with
    its December 19 episode. Eclectic Tech, a new biweekly podcast designed
    to appeal to experienced amateurs, will launch in February.

    Hosted by QST Editor Steve Ford, WB8IMY, Eclectic Tech will highlight
    technical topics involving amateur and non-amateur technology, offer
    brief interviews with individuals involved in projects of interest to
    amateurs, and include practical information of immediate benefit to
    today's hams.

    The Doctor is In co-host Joel Hallas, W1ZR, is selecting some of his
    favorite podcast episodes for re-broadcast in the interim between the
    end of production for The Doctor is In and the debut of Eclectic Tech.
    The complete The Doctor is In archive is available on the ARRL website.
    Hallas will continue to answer questions about amateur radio in QST's
    "The Doctor is In" column.

    The ARRL Audio News podcast will continue to provide a weekly summary
    of news and activities within the amateur radio community.
    FCC Formally opts Proposals to Remove Amateur 3 GHz Band, Invites
    Comments

    The FCC's plan to remove "existing non-federal secondary radiolocation
    and amateur allocations" in the 3.3 - 3.55 GHz band and relocate
    incumbent non-federal operations already has begun drawing fire. The
    Commission formally adopted the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) in
    WT Docket 19-348 on December 12 and invited comments on appropriate
    "transition mechanisms" to make the spectrum available for mobile and
    fixed wireless broadband use. ARRL plans to oppose the move. The
    amateur 9-centimeter allocation is 3.3 - 3.5 GHz.

    "By proposing to delete the existing non-federal secondary allocations
    from the 3.3 - 3.55 GHz band, we are taking an important initial step
    towards satisfying Congress's directives and making as much as 250
    megahertz of spectrum potentially available for advanced wireless
    services, including 5G," the FCC said in the Introduction to its NPRM.

    Some comments arrived before formal adoption of the NPRM, which was
    circulated ahead of the December meeting. Kevin Milner, KD0MA, the
    secretary/treasurer of the Ski Country Amateur Radio Club in Colorado,
    argued that the club's equipment cannot be re-channeled below 3.4 GHz,
    and the club is seeking relocation costs. Devin Ulibarri, W7ND, told
    the FCC that amateur networks in the current band cannot move easily
    into other amateur allocations because there is no readily available
    commercial equipment to support the bandwidth, the FCC said in a
    footnote.

    Currently, the entire 3.1 - 3.55 GHz band is allocated for both federal
    and non-federal radiolocation services, with non-federal users
    operating on a secondary basis to federal radiolocation services.

    With respect to amateur operations, the FCC invited comments on whether
    sufficient amateur spectrum exists in other bands that can support the
    operations currently conducted at 3.3 - 3.5 GHz. The 3.40 - 3.41 GHz
    segment is earmarked for amateur satellite communication. The FCC said
    if non-federal licensees are relocated to the 3.1 - 3.3 GHz band, it
    proposes to have them continue to operate on a secondary basis to
    federal operations, consistent with current band allocations.

    Also at its December 12 meeting, the FCC considered another NPRM in WT
    Docket 19-138 that would "take a fresh and comprehensive look" at the
    rules for the 5.9 GHz band and propose, among other things, to make the
    lower 45 MHz of the band available for unlicensed operations and to
    permit "cellular vehicle-to-everything" (C-V2X) operations in the upper
    20 MHz of the band. The FCC is not proposing to delete or otherwise
    amend the 5-centimeter amateur 5.650 - 5.925 GHz allocation, which
    would continue as secondary. The NPRM, if approved, would address the
    top 75 MHz of that amateur secondary band. Although no changes are
    proposed to the amateur allocation, an anticipated increase in primary
    use could restrict secondary amateur use.

    The Amateur Radio Emergency Data Network (AREDN) has offered its voice
    in challenging the FCC proposals on both 9 and 5 centimeters, saying
    their adoption would "eliminate our use of the most-effective resource
    hams have to build its networks."

    "The AREDN Project is able to leverage low-cost commercial devices
    solely because they are designed to operate on adjacent allocations,"
    AREDN said on its website. "Moving to other allocations would be
    difficult if not impossible without a complete redesign, manufacture,
    purchase, and installation of new custom amateur hardware and
    software...raising the price out of reach for the typical ham."

    FCC Proposes Largest-Ever Fine for Unlicensed Broadcasting

    The FCC has proposed fining an alleged pirate broadcaster in the
    Boston, Massachusetts area more than $450,000. According to the FCC,
    Gerlens Cesar, who operated Radio TeleBoston, used three separate
    transmitters for his broadcasting enterprise, resulting in three
    separate violations of the law.

    "The Commission proposed imposing the statutory maximum forfeiture
    amount for each of these three apparent violations," the FCC said in a
    Notice of Apparent Liability (NAL) released on December 12. Under the
    Communications Act, it is illegal to transmit above certain low-power
    levels, defined within FCC Part 15 rules, without an FCC license.

    "Such pirate radio broadcasting can interfere with licensed
    communications including public safety transmissions," the FCC said.
    The FCC said Cesar apparently simulcasts Radio TeleBoston on three
    unauthorized transmitters on two different frequencies. "His operation
    thus had the potential to cause interference in various locations in
    and around Boston and at different channels on the FM dial," the FCC
    said. "As a result of the scale of this operation, its potential
    impacts, and its continuous nature, the Commission proposed the maximum
    penalty for all three transmitters."

    The FCC reported receiving complaints from Boston-area residents of an
    illegal station operating at both 90.1 and 92.1 MHz. One complaint
    identified Cesar as the operator of Radio TeleBoston. The FCC said it
    had issued multiple warnings. -- FCC Media Release
    The Doctor Will See You Now!

    The Doctor will open the mailbag for the last time in the final
    (December 19) episode of the ARRL The Doctor is In podcast. "Best of
    The Doctor is In" episodes will be released every other week until a
    new podcast, Electic Tech," debuts in February.

    Sponsored by DX Engineering, ARRL The Doctor is In is an informative
    discussion of all things technical. Listen on your computer, tablet, or
    smartphone -- whenever and wherever you like!

    Every 2 weeks since 2016, your host, QST Editor-in-Chief Steve Ford,
    WB8IMY, and the Doctor himself, Joel Hallas, W1ZR, have discussed a
    broad range of technical topics and answered listeners' questions.

    Enjoy ARRL The Doctor is In on Apple iTunes, or by using your iPhone or
    iPad podcast app (just search for ARRL The Doctor is In). You can also
    listen online at Blubrry, or at Stitcher (free registration required,
    or browse the site as a guest) and through the free Stitcher app for
    iOS, Kindle, or Android devices. If you've never listened to a podcast
    before, download our beginner's guide.

    AztechSat-1 CubeSat to Demonstrate Intra-Satellite Communication

    The AztechSat-1 CubeSat, which traveled to the International Space
    Station (ISS) earlier this month on the 19th Space-X Commercial
    Resupply Services (CRS-19) mission for NASA, will listen for emergency
    messages in the 439 MHz range and retransmit them for amateur radio
    operators to copy on its 437.300 MHz downlink using the Winlink
    protocol, once the CubeSat has been placed into orbit. The satellite is
    a project of Mexico's Universidad Popular Aut¢noma del Estado de Puebla
    (UPAEP). Aztechsat-1 is set for deployment from the ISS in late
    January.

    "The primary objective of the project is to establish communication
    with the commercial GlobalStar satellites in order to improve data
    transmission to Earth," a UPAEP news release said. AztechSat-1 will
    create a saturation map of 435 - 438 MHz by listening for the whole
    orbit and returning captured data to the ground station on the 437.300
    MHz amateur radio downlink (9k6 GMSK or FSK) plus a 1600 MHz GlobalStar
    link. Emergency messages received via Globalstar to the AztechSat-1
    ground station will be shared on the project's website.

    A certificate will be available for amateur stations receiving the
    emergency message(s) and reporting these for confirmation by the
    AztechSat-1 team.

    Details are on the AztechSat-1 website and on the IARU Amateur Radio
    Satellite Communication page.

    The project is part of NASA's CubeSat Launch Initiative, which offers
    universities, high schools, and nonprofit organizations the opportunity
    to fly small satellites. "Innovative technology partnerships keep down
    the cost, providing students a way to obtain hands-on experience
    developing flight hardware," a NASA report said.

    NASA explained, "The investigation demonstrates communication within a
    satellite network in low-Earth orbit. Such intra-satellite
    communication could reduce the need for ground stations, lowering the
    cost and increasing the number of data downloads possible for satellite
    applications."
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: It's been 36 consecutive days with no
    sunspots. Geomagnetic conditions were quiet until a minor solar wind
    stream hit on December 18, driving the planetary A index to 13 from the
    low single digits earlier in the week.

    The average planetary A index for December 12 - 18 rose to 4.6, from
    3.7 over the previous 7 days, while mid-latitude A index increased from
    1.9 to 4. Predicted solar flux over the next 45 days is 70. The
    predicted planetary A index is 10, 8, and 8 on December 19 - 21; 5 on
    December 22 - January 4; 8 on January 5; 5 on January 6 - 8; 8 on
    January 9 - 10; 5 on January 11 - 13; 12 on January 14; 10 on January
    15 - 17; 5 on January 18 - 31, and 8 on February 1.

    Because of weak solar activity, the ARRL 10 Meter Contest last weekend
    was rather slow. QST's "The World Above 50 MHz" editor Jon Jones, N0JK,
    in Kansas said he encountered a strong opening to Argentina and Chile
    on Sunday. He said the propagation mechanism appeared to be sporadic E.
    More details in the weekly bulletin on December 20.

    Sunspot numbers for December 12 - 18 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0, with
    a mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 70.5, 68.9, 70.3, 71, 70,
    70.5, and 70.2, with a mean of 70.2. Estimated planetary A indices were
    4, 4, 3, 5, 1, 2, and 13, with a mean of 4.6. Middle latitude A index
    was 3, 3, 2, 5, 1, 2, and 12, with a mean of 4.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * December 20 -- AGB-Party Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * December 20 -- Russian 160-Meter Contest (CW, phone)
    * December 21 -- Feld Hell Sprint
    * December 21 -- OK DX RTTY Contest
    * December 21 - 22 -- Padang DX Contest (Phone)
    * December 21 - 22 -- Gedebage CW Contest
    * December 21 - 22 -- Croatian CW Contest
    * December 22 -- RAEM Contest (CW)
    * December 22 -- ARRL Rookie Roundup, CW
    * December 25 -- SKCC Sprint (CW)
    * December 26 -- DARC Christmas Contest (CW, phone)
    * December 28 -- RAC Winter Contest (CW, phone)
    * December 28 - 29 -- 1.8 Stew Perry Topband Challenge (CW)
    * December 28 - 29 -- Original QRP Contest (CW)
    * December 30 - 31 -- QCX Challenge (CW)
    * December 31 -- Bogor Old and New Contest (Phone)
    * January 1 -- Straight Key Night
    * January 1 -- AGB New Year Snowball Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * January 1 -- SARTG New Year RTTY Contest
    * January 1 -- AGCW Happy New Year Contest (CW)
    * January 1 -- AGCW VHF/UHF Contest (CW)
    * January 1 -- QRP ARCI New Year's Sprint (CW)
    * January 1 -- 3.5 UKEICC 80-Meter Contest (Phone)
    * January 2 -- NRAU 10-Meter Activity Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * January 2 -- SKCC Sprint Europe (CW)
    * January 4 -- ARRL Kids Day (Phone)
    * January 4 -- PODXS 070 Club PSKFest (Digital)
    * January 4 -- RSGB AFS Contest, CW
    * January 4 - 5 -- WW PMC Contest (CW, phone)
    * January 4 - 5 -- ARRL RTTY Roundup
    * January 4 - 5 -- EUCW 160-Meter Contest (CW)
    * January 6 - 12 -- All IQRP Quarterly Marathon (CW, phone, digital)
    * January 7 -- ARS Spartan Sprint (CW)
    * January 8 - 12 -- AWA Linc Cundall Memorial CW Contest

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on amateur radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    Volunteers Celebrate 98th Anniversary of ARRL Transatlantic Tests at
    W1AW

    A group of radio amateurs gathered on December 11 at W1AW to mark the
    98th anniversary of the successful ARRL Transatlantic Tests. On
    December 11, 1921, a message transmitted by a group of Radio Club of
    America members at 1BCG in Greenwich, Connecticut, was copied by Paul
    Godley, 2ZE, in Scotland. Reporting on the accomplishment, ARRL
    Secretary Kenneth B. Warner, 1EH, declared "Excelsior!" Clark Burgard,
    N1BCG -- who lives in Greenwich and styles his call sign as "n1BCG" to
    honor the original 1BCG -- was among those on hand at the Maxim
    Memorial Station.

    Those pitching in to take part in
    the day-long anniversary celebration
    included (L-R) Michael Pfaeffle,
    K3FEF; Lisa Kress; Brian Kress,
    KB3WFV; Bob Allison, WB1GCM; Blaine
    Morin, N1GTU, and Clark Burgard,
    N1BCG. Not shown are Chris Codella,
    W2PA; Glenn Cooper, W2BK, and Greg
    Fiozzo, KD2HRD.

    "We completed a successful special event yesterday at W1AW
    commemorating the 98th anniversary of the Transatlantic Tests," Burgard
    recounted. "This was particularly important historically to amateur
    radio as it was originally organized by ARRL in 1921 to determine if
    low-power amateur radio stations using shortwave frequencies could
    actually be heard in Europe. Until then, it was thought impossible."

    Burgard pointed out that the 1921 event changed radio history, was
    covered in three issues of QST, and opened the door to the first
    two-way transatlantic tests a couple of years later. The 1921
    transatlantic success marked the beginning of what would become routine
    communication between US radio amateurs and those in other parts of the
    world -- literally the birth of DX.

    NTIA Spectrum Manager Stephen Veader, N4DXS, SK

    Stephen Veader, N4DXS, of Dale City, Virginia, a major
    behind-the-scenes player in the effort that led to creation of amateur
    radio's 60-meter band in the US, died on November 5. An ARRL Life
    Member, he was 67.

    As a spectrum manager for the National Telecommunications and
    Information ministration (NTIA), Veader was deeply involved on the
    behalf of NTIA in the effort to secure a new amateur band at 5 MHz.
    According to Ross Merlin, WA2WDT, when it became clear that a proposal
    for a 15 kHz band would not be approved, Veader was instrumental in
    fashioning the compromise that led to the authorization of the five
    discrete secondary channels radio amateurs have today, and other
    countries copied that template for their 5 MHz amateur allocations.
    Today, these spot frequencies serve as "interoperability channels" for
    federal and amateur stations to share in emergencies and exercises.

    Veader was active within the SHARES HF radio community as the
    representative for NTIA. A native of Boston, Veader was a US Air Force
    veteran. During his years at NTIA, he also provided regulatory guidance
    on the use of SHARES for federal and non-federal radio users.

    "Steve was a good friend to SHARES and to amateur radio," Merlin said.
    Veader was also an avid RTTY enthusiast and was active in many contests
    throughout the year. A service was held on November 15. -- Thanks to
    Ross Merlin, WA2WDT
    Bar Code Lead Developer George Laurer, K4HZE, SK

    The lead developer of the bar code system that became the
    now-ubiquitous Universal Product Code (UPC), George Laurer, K4HZE, of
    Wendell, North Carolina, died on December 5. He was 94. While an
    electrical engineer with IBM in North Carolina's Research Triangle Park
    in the early 1970s, Laurer led the effort to develop the bar code
    system. The UPC, composed of 30 unique black bars and a 12-digit
    number, allows retailers to identify products and prices as they are
    scanned. It was used for the first time in a retail setting in 1974.

    Laurer also later patented one of the first handheld UPC scanners,
    according to his obituary. As The Washington Post reported, "The
    bar-code concept had originated in the 1940s, when N. Joseph Woodland
    designed a bull's eye-shaped system of concentric circles, inspired by
    the dots and dashes of Morse code." Woodland became a colleague of
    Laurer's at IBM, and Laurer considered him "the father of the
    supermarket scanning system."

    A native of New York, Laurer served in the US Army during World War II
    after being drafted while he was still a junior in high school. He
    graduated from the University of Maryland in 1951 and spent 3 decades
    working for IBM. Accounts describe Laurer as an inveterate tinkerer,
    even up to his final years.

    IBM never patented the bar code system, but made it publicly available
    in order to sell the associated hardware.
    In Brief...

    Kids Day is Saturday, January 4 The first Saturday in January is Kids
    Day -- the time to get youngsters on the air to share in the joy and
    fun that amateur radio can provide. Kids Day gets under way on
    Saturday, January 4, at 1800 UTC and concludes at 2359 UTC. Sponsored
    by the Boring (Oregon) Amateur Radio Club, this event has a simple
    exchange, suitable for younger operators: First name, age, location,
    and favorite color. After that, the contact can be as long or as short
    as each participant prefers. Kids Day is the perfect opportunity to
    open your shack door and invite kids over to see what amateur radio has
    to offer. Details are on the ARRL website.

    ARRL Lifelong Learning Manager to Keynote Ham Radio University 2020 in
    January ARRL Lifelong Learning Manager Kris Bickell, K1BIC, will be the
    keynote speaker at Ham Radio University 2020 (HRU 2020). The annual
    event, now in its 21st year, will take place on Saturday, January 4, in
    the Hillwood Commons Student Center at Long Island University-Post, 720
    Northern Blvd., Brookville, New York. HRU 2020 is billed as, "A day of
    education to share ideas, experiences, knowledge, and fellowship among
    amateur radio operators." Doors open at 7:30 AM. A Newcomer's Meeting
    and HRU Orientation, geared toward first-time visitors, gets under way
    at 8:30 AM. Thirty forums are on the schedule, with topics such as
    typical HF antennas, ham radio logging programs, satellite operation,
    and more. Hands-on workshops will cover such topics as cables and
    connectors and electronic test equipment. mission is free, although a
    $5 donation is suggested. Special event station W2HRU will be on the
    air. Amateur radio license examinations will be given starting at 1:30
    PM. Food and refreshments will be available.

    SAQ, Sweden's Alexanderson Alternator, Announces Scheduled Christmas
    Eve Transmission SAQ, the call sign of the 1920s vintage Alexanderson
    transmitter in Grimeton, Sweden, is set to be on the air for its annual
    Christmas Eve transmission. SAQ transmits CW with up to 200 kW on 17.2
    kHz. Tune-up is scheduled to begin at around 0730 UTC, with the holiday
    message transmitted at 0800 UTC. SAQ will livestream the event. SAQ has
    introduced a new reception report form for listeners and has asked
    listeners not to send SAQ reception reports via email. The SK6SAQ
    amateur radio station will be active on 7.035 kHz and 14.035 MHz CW or
    3.755 MHz SSB, with two stations on the air most of the time. Given its
    age, the Alexanderson alternator does not always function as intended.
    The transmitter experienced a failure during its scheduled UN Day
    transmission on October 24.

    FCC Invites Comments on Digital AM Broadcasting Proposal The FCC has
    invited comments on a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM), that would
    allow AM broadcasters to transmit an all-digital signal using the HD
    Radio in-band on-channel (IBOC) mode, known as MA3.1. "We tentatively
    conclude that a voluntary transition to all-digital broadcasting has
    the potential to benefit AM stations and provide improved AM service to
    the listening public," the FCC said. "We seek comments on proposed
    operating standards for all-digital stations and the impact of such
    operations on existing analog stations and listeners." The proceeding
    was initiated by a March 2019 Petition for Rulemaking (Petition) filed
    by Bryan Broadcasting Corporation. "This proceeding continues the
    Commission's efforts to improve and update the AM radio service to
    provide a better listening experience for consumers and enhanced
    service offerings, as part of our continuing effort to revitalize AM
    broadcasting," the FCC said in the introduction to the NPRM. Comments
    are due 60 days after the NPRM appears in The Federal Register.
    Getting It Right!

    In the article, "Collegiate QSO Party 2018 and 2019 Plaque Recipients
    Announced," the 2018 second-place alumni low-power winner was
    incorrect. The winner was Frank J. Maynard, NF8M.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * January 4 -- New York City-Long Island Section Convention,
    Brookville, New York
    * January 17 - 18 -- North Texas Section Convention, Forest Hill,
    Texas
    * January 19 - 25 -- Quartzfest, Quartzsite, Arizona
    * January 24 - 26 -- Puerto Rico State Convention, Hatillo, Puerto
    Rico
    * January 25 -- ARRL Midwest Conference, Collinsville, Illinois

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
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    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Jan 10 09:05:02 2020
    The ARRL Letter
    January 9, 2020

    * ARRL's New On the Air Magazine on its Way to Members
    * Volunteer Monitor Program Coordinator Looks Forward to a Positive
    2020
    * ARRL CEO Challenges Members: "Dare to Imagine"
    * So Now What? Podcast
    * Strong Earthquake Shakes Puerto Rico; Generating Capacity Severely
    Compromised
    * Australian Bushfires Causing Major Telecommunication Outages, Hams
    on Duty
    * Radio Amateurs of Canada Announces a New Section
    * China Telecoms Regulator Proposing to Delete Some Current Amateur
    Allocations
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * ARISS Next-Generation Radio System Ready for Launch to Space
    Station
    * CAMSAT Says CAS-6 Activation for Amateur Use Has Been Delayed
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    ARRL's New On the Air Magazine on its Way to Members

    The premiere issue of ARRL's On the Air magazine has left the printer
    and is on its way to member subscribers. The magazine should be in
    mailboxes within the next 10 days.


    On the Air is the newest ARRL member benefit to help new licensees and
    beginner-to-intermediate radio communicators navigate the world of
    amateur radio. Eligible US-based members can elect to receive On the
    Air or QST magazine in print when they join or when they renew their
    ARRL membership.

    Delivered six times a year, the magazine will present articles and tips
    on selecting equipment, building projects, and getting involved in
    emergency communication. On the Air will also spotlight the experiences
    of those involved in public service communication and casual operating.

    All members will be able to access digital editions of On the Air
    magazine. The first digital issue of On the Air will be available
    beginning January 14, supported by a new version of ARRL's digital
    magazine app. With one app, members will be able to access On the Air
    and QST.
    Volunteer Monitor Program Coordinator Looks Forward to a Positive 2020

    In a holiday season message to ARRL leadership and to members of the
    new ARRL Volunteer Monitor (VM) program, its coordinator, Riley
    Hollingsworth, K4ZDH, expressed his gratitude to all involved for their
    contributions to getting the program off to a solid start in January.

    "It will be a good year," Hollingsworth said. "We will have fun, you
    will enjoy it more than you probably think, and -- thanks to the talent
    and generosity of one of our VMs -- a computer program will make your
    reporting much easier (there will be no need for bi-monthly reports!),"
    he wrote. "This is our opportunity to help amateur radio last another
    hundred years and to pay forward this wonderful avocation that joyfully
    occupies our lives. This could be our legacy if we do it with all the
    energy and devotion that characterized the Official Observer (OO)
    program for decades."

    Hollingsworth said the success of the OO program convinced the FCC to
    trust ARRL with the responsibilities now to be taken up by the
    Volunteer Monitor program. "Those of you who are former OOs have an
    extra reason to be proud, and amateur radio is grateful to you more
    than you will ever know," Hollingsworth concluded. "Thank you. It will
    be a privilege to work with you this new year."

    Approved by the ARRL Board of Directors in 2018, the Volunteer Monitor
    program supplants the venerable OO program. The VM program represents a
    formal agreement between the FCC and ARRL in which volunteers trained
    and vetted by ARRL will monitor the airwaves and collect evidence that
    can be used to correct misconduct. The program also will recognize
    exemplary on-air operation, something not done during the OO program.
    Cases of flagrant violations will be referred to the FCC by ARRL for
    action in accordance with FCC guidelines.

    The FCC proposed the new program in the wake of several FCC regional
    office closures and a reduction in field staff. It will give
    enforcement priority to cases developed by the Volunteer Monitor
    program without ARRL's having to refer cases through the FCC online
    complaint process.

    ARRL CEO Challenges Members: "Dare to Imagine"

    In his January 2020 QST "Second Century" editorial, ARRL CEO Howard
    Michel, WB2ITX, challenges members to imagine what ARRL and amateur
    radio will look like in 5 years and beyond and to dare to imagine
    change.

    "Younger hams are not just younger versions of you or me," Michel
    writes. "They have grown up in a different world." He points out that
    75% of non-members hold Technician licenses. "But more than license
    class, their interests are different. Their demographics are different.
    They are different, and they want different things," he said. His
    approach is to target specific interest groups, which he calls
    "verticals," that will allow ARRL to provide individual members what
    they want.

    "We can try to mold the future generation of hams to our image, or we
    can embrace new hams for what they are," Michel asserted. "ARRL needs
    to do the latter."

    In addition to initiatives such as the new On the Air magazine,
    debuting this month in print and digital editions, and the Lifelong
    Learning program to engage new licensees, Michel is proposing verticals
    focusing on radiosport, experimentation, and emergency communication.
    He's recommending a new family of "mini-magazines" to reach niche
    membership interests. "To jump start the mini-mag revolution," he said,
    "We will offer NCJ and QEX in digital form to everyone." ARRL also
    plans to hire a national club coordinator this year.

    "Our focus will be on developing ways, and an infrastructure, that
    members can use to organize themselves in ways they want, to do things
    that they consider meaningful," Michel said.

    He has invited members' comments.
    So Now What? Podcast

    In the final episode of So Now What? hosts Michelle Patnode, W3MVP, and
    Joe Carcia, NJ1Q, will speak with ARRL VEC Assistant Manager Amanda
    Grimaldi, N1NHL.

    An archive of So Now What? episodes will remain on Blubrry and will be
    accessible via the podcast's web page. Users can still direct questions
    regarding the podcast via email.

    Thank you to LDG Electronics for sponsoring the show and thanks to
    everyone for listening!

    Strong Earthquake Shakes Puerto Rico; Generating Capacity Severely
    Compromised

    ARRL Puerto Rico Section Manager Oscar Resto, KP4RF, says small tremors
    continue on the island in the wake of the 6.4 magnitude earthquake that
    struck the southwestern part of the island on January 7. A magnitude
    5.8 quake struck a day earlier. The Puerto Rico Electric Power
    Authority (PREPA) reported widespread power outages after generating
    plants automatically activated protective shutdown systems following
    the earthquake. But Resto told ARRL this week that considerable
    generating capacity was lost due to earthquake damage, and that it will
    take at least several days before replacement units can be brought back
    on line. Only about 20% of the island has electric power at this point,
    he estimated.

    "We have a shortage of about 1,100 megawatts of power," Resto told
    ARRL. "We normally need about 2,000 megawatts for the island."

    Resto cited the largely operational telecommunications network as the
    reason why no Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) activations have
    been necessary. "We have cell phones all over the island working," he
    said. Resto told ARRL that he's been working up a list of ready and
    resilient amateur radio volunteers who would be able to muster if
    needed to assist the American Red Cross, with which Puerto Rico ARES
    has a memorandum of understanding. "We are in continuous communication
    with the ARC in case we're needed."

    Resto stressed that he wants to avoid situations where volunteers
    activate only to be told they're not needed.

    The worst-impacted cities were Guayanilla, Pe¤uelas, Yauco, and
    Gu nica. Resto said engineers have determined that 80% of the houses in
    the earthquake's impact zone are uninhabitable. Residents are sleeping
    outdoors, Resto said.

    Puerto Rico Section Public Information Officer Angel Santana, WP3GW,
    told ARRL that VHF and UHF repeaters with emergency power have carried
    reports of power and water outages, the continuing aftershocks, and
    other information on an informal basis. Bottled water and canned food
    have been in high demand, he said. Santana said the PREMA Emergency
    Operations Center (EOC) has been activated.

    Resto earlier this week called the situation "scary, with houses,
    schools, and roads collapsing." At least one death has resulted from
    the earthquake. He said the earthquake disaster definitely was a
    setback for the US territory as it continues its long recovery from
    severe hurricane damage in 2017. But, he added, the restored
    telecommunications infrastructure is more robust, to minimize damage in
    future disasters.
    Australian Bushfires Causing Major Telecommunication Outages, Hams on
    Duty

    Wireless Institute of Australia (WIA) President Greg Kelly, VK2GPK,
    says the bushfires in Australia have caused significant disruption of
    telecommunication services in the states of Victoria and New South
    Wales. Radio amateurs are supporting relief operations and
    communication.

    WICEN (Wireless Institute Civil Emergency Network) in New South Wales
    reports it has been active assisting in a number of multi-agency
    activities during the bushfire emergency, in its role as a support
    squad of the NSW Volunteer Rescue Association (VRA) operations center
    in Bega. WICEN teams in NSW and in the Australian Capital Territory
    (ACT) have sent a team to Bega to help re-establish radio communication
    services, disrupted by fire activity.

    WICEN and other VRA squads continue to support the Rural Fire Service
    (RFS) at various Fire Control Centers and the Bushfire Information
    Line. Other WICEN members remain active with the RFS and the State
    Emergency Service.

    Kelley has asked radio amateurs in International Amateur Radio Union
    (IARU) Region 3 to monitor the emergency communications frequencies,
    per the IARU Region 3 band plan, whenever possible, as well as
    repeaters. "Amateurs seeking to establish emergency communication
    should use these EMCOMM frequencies in the first instance, or repeaters
    if available," he said in a statement posted on the IARU Region 3
    website.

    "Radio amateurs who are volunteers for [WICEN and other emergency
    communication organizations] should keep themselves updated," Kelley
    advised. "Emergency communication is one of the main reasons radio
    amateurs have access to RF spectrum. Please assist if and when you
    can."

    The IARU Region 3 emergency "center of activity" frequencies are 3.600,
    7.110, 14.300, 18.160, and 21.360 MHz. These are not net frequencies,
    but they are recommended as starting points for emergency traffic, and
    activity may extend 5 kHz above or below the designated center
    frequency.

    South of NSW in the state of Victoria, WICEN VIC reports that the
    amateur repeater network is largely off the air, possibly due to a lack
    of power. "Some sites may have been directly affected by fire," WICEN
    VIC said on January 4. "It could be some weeks until the sites can be
    reached for inspection."

    Radio Amateurs of Canada Announces a New Section

    The number of Sections needed for a clean sweep in the ARRL November
    Sweepstakes (SS) will rise to 84 in 2020, with the addition of a new
    Prince Edward Island (PE) Section. Radio Amateurs of Canada (RAC) has
    announced that the new Section will become effective on April 1.

    Prince Edward Island has been in the Maritimes (MAR) Section. RAC said
    its Prince Edward Island members have been working for some time to
    create a separate Section for RAC ARES activities there. The provinces
    of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick will remain in the Maritimes Section.

    In addition to Field Day and Sweepstakes, the new Section in Canada
    will affect the ARRL 160-Meter Contest but not the ARRL 10-Meter
    Contest, which uses individual states/provinces for US and Canadian
    multipliers. The change will mean that logging software developers will
    have to update their software to include the PE Section as a valid
    exchange element for any affected operating events.

    RAC also announced an adjustment in two of its Ontario Sections.
    Effective April 1, radio amateurs in the City of Hamilton and in the
    Regional Municipality of Niagara will shift to the Greater Toronto Area
    (GTA) Section from the Ontario South (ONS) Section.
    China Telecoms Regulator Proposing to Delete Some Current Amateur
    Allocations

    China's telecommunications regulator has proposed amending the Measures
    for the ministration of Amateur Radio Stations, and some amateur
    bands are in danger of being eliminated. Lide Zhang, BI8CKU, told ARRL
    that the proposal would prohibit amateur operation on the 2200-meter
    band as well as on 146 - 148 MHz, 1260 - 1300 MHz, 3400 - 3500 MHz,
    5650 - 5725 MHz, and all bands above 10 GHz.

    Radio communications engineer and Chinese Amateur Satellite Group
    (CAMSAT) CEO Alan Kung, BA1DU, told ARRL that government efforts to
    eliminate some amateur bands are nothing new, but proposals that have
    been aired for a while now are on the regulatory agency's schedule.
    Kung said he does not anticipate that all of the bands proposed will be
    taken away, but he conceded that the climate will "undoubtedly" become
    increasingly more dangerous for China's amateur radio community.

    "The attempt to crowd out the amateur radio bands has a long history
    throughout the world," he said, "but it may never have become so urgent
    for the amateur radio community as it is today. We all understand that
    radio spectrum resources have become a bottleneck for further
    development." He said today's radio communication industry "is working
    hard to share spectrum resources."

    Kung characterized spectrum as "the soil on which amateur radio
    depends."

    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: Sunspots appeared recently, all
    indicating that they belong to Cycle 25 due to their polarity, which is
    just the opposite from Cycle 24 spots. Sunspots appeared December 24 -
    26, and what appeared to be a new Cycle 25 spot showed up on January 1.
    NOAA did not report it, but Spaceweather.com reported a sunspot number
    of 11 for January 1.

    Predicted solar flux for the next 45 days is higher than in recent
    forecasts: 72 on January 2-9; 70 on January 10-11; 72 on January 12-25;
    70 on January 26 - February 7, and 72 on February 8-15.

    Predicted planetary A index is 5 on January 2-13; 12 on January 14-15;
    5 on January 16-25; 8 on January 2-28; 5 on January 29 - February 9; 10
    on February 10-11, and 5 on February 12-15.

    Sunspot numbers for December 19-25 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 24, and 23, with
    a mean of 6.7. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 69.9, 70, 70.6, 71, 72.6,
    72.7, and 72.1, with a mean of 71.3. Estimated planetary A indices were
    13, 5, 5, 4, 4, 3, and 4, with a mean of 5.4. The middle latitude A
    index was 12, 4, 4, 2, 2, 2, and 3, with a mean of 4.1.

    Sunspot numbers for December 26 - January 1 were 11, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and
    11, with a mean of 3.1. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 72.1, 72.4, 72.2,
    72, 70.9, 70.5, and 71.8, with a mean of 71.7. Estimated planetary A
    indices were 5, 3, 2, 2, 3, 4, and 3, with a mean of 3.1. Middle
    latitude A index was 3, 2, 0, 0, 2, 4, and 3, with a mean of 2.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * January 11 -- YB DX Contest (Phone)
    * January 11 -- Old New Year Contest (CW, phone)
    * January 11 - 12 -- UBA PSK63 Prefix Contest
    * January 11 - 12 -- SKCC Weekend Sprintathon (CW)
    * January 11 - 12 -- North American QSO Party, CW
    * January 12 -- NRAU-Baltic Contest, SSB, CW (separate events)
    * January 12 -- DARC 10-Meter Contest (CW, phone)
    * January 12 -- RSGB AFS Contest, Data
    * January 12 - 15 -- Classic Exchange (CW)
    * January 13 -- 4 States QRP Group Second Sunday Sprint (CW, phone)
    * January 16 -- NAQCC CW Sprint (CW)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on amateur radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    ARISS Next-Generation Radio System Ready for Launch to Space Station

    Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) reports that
    its first Interoperable Radio System (IORS) flight unit -- serial
    number 1001 -- has been delivered to NASA's Johnson Space Center for
    launch in early March. The IORS represents the first major upgrade in
    ARISS equipment on the International Space Station since Amateur Radio
    gained a permanent presence onboard the ISS in 2000. In December, ARISS
    received approval from NASA Safety to launch the IORS on SpaceX CRS-20
    and stow the radio system on the ISS for future installation.

    "The IORS is a foundational element of the ARISS next-generation radio
    system and is an incredible engineering achievement by the ARISS
    hardware team," ARISS International President Frank Bauer, KA3HDO,
    said. "This first element delivery will support easier radio mode
    transitions and enable new, exciting capabilities for hams, students,
    and the general public."

    The new system includes a higher-power radio, an enhanced voice
    repeater, and updated digital packet radio (APRS) and slow-scan
    television (SSTV) capabilities for both the US and Russian space
    station segments. The IORS consists of a custom-modified JVC Kenwood
    TM-D710GA transceiver, an AMSAT-developed multi-voltage power supply,
    and interconnecting cables.

    The IORS set to launch in March will be installed in the ISS Columbus
    module; a second flight unit is expected to be launched later this year
    for installation in the Russian Service module. The ARISS hardware team
    will assemble four flight units -- and 10 IORS units in all -- to
    support onboard flight operations, training, operations planning, and
    hardware testing.

    ARISS International President Frank
    Bauer, KA3HDO.

    "Future upgrades and enhancements to the next-generation system are in
    various stages of design and development," Bauer said. "These include a
    repaired Ham Video system -- currently planned for launch in
    mid-to-late 2020, L-band (uplink) repeater, ground command operations
    capability, LimeSDR signal reception, a microwave 'Ham Communicator,'
    and Lunar Gateway prototype experiment."

    Bauer said a lot of "heavy lifting" remains to prepare the IORS for
    operation on the space station. "ARISS has 92 engineering requirements
    and our operations Phase III safety review to complete," he explained.
    "The space agencies take a position of 'trust, but verify.' Thus, these
    engineering and safety 'verifications' all need to be closed out before
    the IORS can be unstowed and turned on. This will be the ARISS hardware
    team's focus over the next few months."

    Bauer reminded that ARISS is almost entirely run by volunteers and
    encouraged donations for next-generation hardware developments,
    operations, education, and administrative functions.
    CAMSAT Says CAS-6 Activation for Amateur Use Has Been Delayed

    Chinese Amateur Satellite Group (CAMSAT) CEO Alan Kung, BA1DU, told
    ARRL this week that some problems with the precise attitude
    determination of the newly launched CAS-6 amateur radio satellite have
    delayed deployment of the antennas. The satellite was to have been put
    into service within 3 days.

    "If the V/UHF antennas are deployed now, additional torque may affect
    determination of the satellite attitude," Kung said. "Engineers need to
    modify and upload the software, which will take some time." He said
    that taking into consideration the upcoming long Chinese New Year
    holiday, the test work is planned to be completed sometime in late
    February or early March. At that time, VHF/UHF antennas will be
    deployed, and the amateur radio payload will be available for use.

    Kung points out that the satellite's CW beacon has been turned on,
    although the antenna has not yet been deployed. "If you have a 'big
    ear,' you may be able to receive weak signal leaked from an undeployed
    antenna on 145.910 MHz," he said. "A polyimide cover on the antenna
    chassis can help to leak some RF signal."

    CAMSAT has provided CAS-6 Satellite Digital Telemetry Description and
    CW Telemetry Beacon Encoding Format documents. -- Thanks to Alan Kung,
    BA1DU
    In Brief...

    ARRL San Joaquin Valley Section Manager Dan Pruitt, AE6SX, of Fresno,
    California, died on December 27. He was 68 and had been hospitalized as
    a result of a fall. First licensed in 1965, Pruitt had served as SJV SM
    since 2009 and had begun a new 2-year term last year. Assistant SM John
    Litz, NZ6Q, has been appointed to succeed him. Pruitt had previously
    served as Fresno County Emergency Coordinator, and his focus has been
    on improving emergency communication in his region, working with the
    Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service (RACES), the National Traffic
    System, the Military Auxiliary Radio System (MARS), the American Red
    Cross, the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT), and the System for
    ministration, Training, and Educational Resources for NASA. He had
    also served as SJV Public Information Officer. Litz, an ARRL Life
    Member from Stockton, California, was first licensed in 1974. He is
    active in many facets of Amateur Radio, and has served as an Assistant
    Section Manager in San Joaquin Valley for the past year.

    Tickets for three traditional dinners held in association with the 2020
    Dayton Hamvention^(R) in May are now available. The DX Dinner, the Top
    Band Dinner, and the Contest Dinner. Inductees to the CQ DX and CQ
    Contest Halls of Fame will be announced at the DX Dinner and Contest
    Dinner, respectively. Hall of Fame nominations are due by March 1. Read
    more.

    ARRL West Central Florida Section Celebrating its 20th Anniversary this
    Year The ARRL West Central Florida Section is marking its 20th
    anniversary this year. The Section newsletter, the WCF Presser,
    includes information on celebratory activities. A K4WCF special event
    in January will activate all 10 of the Section's counties, with
    additional K4WCF special events later in the year. The West Central
    Florida Section website also has a new look for the 20th anniversary
    celebration, its first since January 2015. West Central Florida was
    ARRL's 71st Section. It includes Charlotte, DeSoto, Hardee, Highlands,
    Hillsborough, Manatee, Pasco, Pinellas, Polk, and Sarasota counties.
    Darrell Davis, KT4WX, is the West Central Florida Section Manager.

    Wolf Hadel, DK2OM, stepped down at year's end as coordinator of the
    International Amateur Radio Union Region 1 Monitoring System (IARUMS).
    IARU Region 1 President Don Beattie, G3BJ, announced in December that,
    after many years of monitoring and tracking intruders on the amateur
    bands, Hadel has been awarded the IARU President's Diamond Award in
    recognition of his efforts. Hadel worked for the Deutscher Amateur
    Radio Club (DARC) monitoring system for more than 30 years and has
    coordinated IARUMS since 2005. IARUMS Region 1 Vice Coordinator Peter
    Jost, HB9CET, will take over as coordinator for the time being. Read
    more.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * January 17 - 18 -- North Texas Section Convention, Forest Hill,
    Texas
    * January 19 - 25 -- Quartzfest, Quartzsite, Arizona
    * January 25 -- ARRL Midwest Conference, Collinsville, Illinois
    * February 1 -- South Carolina State Convention, North Charleston,
    South Carolina
    * February 1 -- Virginia State Convention, Richmond, VA
    * February 7 - 9 -- Northern Florida Section Convention, Orlando,
    Florida
    * February 14 - 15 -- Southwest Division Convention, Yuma, Arizona

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

    .

    .
    * Join or Renew Today! ARRL membership includes QST, amateur radio's
    most popular and informative journal, delivered to your mailbox
    each month.
    * Listen to ARRL Audio News, available every Friday.

    Subscribe to...
    * NCJ -- National Contest Journal. Published bimonthly, features
    articles by top contesters, letters, hints, statistics, scores, NA
    Sprint, and QSO parties.
    * QEX -- A Forum for Communications Experimenters. Published
    bimonthly, features technical articles, construction projects,
    columns, and other items of interest to radio amateurs and
    communications professionals.

    Free of charge to ARRL members...
    * Subscribe to the ARES E-Letter (monthly public service and
    emergency communications news), the ARRL Contest Update (biweekly
    contest newsletter), Division and Section news alerts -- and much
    more!
    * Find ARRL on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter and Instagram!
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
    and registered guests may subscribe at no cost or unsubscribe by editing
    their profile.

    Copyright (c) 2020 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
    non-commercial or educational purposes, with attribution. All other
    purposes require written permission.


    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Jan 17 09:05:18 2020
    The ARRL Letter
    January 16, 2020

    * ARRL On the Air Podcast Premieres January 16
    * Leadership Elections to Highlight January 17 - 18 ARRL Annual Board
    Meeting
    * US Air Force Space Fence Nearing Operational Acceptance
    * Puerto Rico Earthquake Relief Effort Continues, with Help from Ham
    Radio
    * 2019 ARRL Periodicals Available on DVD and via Download
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * YOTA Month Reported a Success in the Americas
    * Nominations Solicited for Six ARRL Awards
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    ARRL On the Air Podcast Premieres January 16

    ARRL's new On the Air podcast for those just getting started on their
    amateur radio journey will debut this Thursday, January 16, with a new
    episode posted each month. The podcast is a companion to the new
    bimonthly On the Air magazine, which is already on its way to member
    subscribers. On the Air magazine's Editorial Director Becky Schoenfeld,
    W1BXY, will be the host of the new podcast. Both the podcast and the
    magazine are aimed at offering new and beginner-to-intermediate-level
    radio amateurs a fresh approach to exploring radio communication.

    Listeners can find the On the Air podcast at Blubrry, Apple iTunes (or
    by using your iPhone or iPad podcast app -- search for On the Air), and
    Stitcher (or through the free Stitcher app for iOS, Kindle, or Android
    devices). Episodes will be archived on the ARRL website.

    Each On the Air podcast will take a deeper dive into the articles and
    issues raised in the magazine, including advice and insight on topics
    covering the range of amateur radio interests and activities: radio
    technology, operating, equipment, project building, and emergency
    communication.

    Supplementing On the Air will be a new Facebook page for those who
    share a love of radio communication and are looking to learn and
    explore more about their interests.

    The biweekly Eclectic Tech podcast for experienced radio amateurs will
    launch on February 13. Hosted by QST Editor Steve Ford, WB8IMY,
    Eclectic Tech will highlight topics involving amateur and non-amateur
    technology, offer brief interviews with individuals involved in
    projects of interest to amateurs, and include practical information of
    immediate benefit to today's hams. Eclectic Tech will be available via
    iTunes and Stitcher.

    The ARRL Mags apps including QST and On the Air are now live on Apple
    iTunes and Google Play. The digital edition of On the Air magazine is
    also live and linked from the On the Air page on the ARRL website.
    Leadership Elections to Highlight January 17 - 18 ARRL Annual Board
    Meeting

    Southeastern
    Division
    Director
    Mickey
    Baker, N4MB.
    [Michelle
    Patnode,
    W3MVP,
    photo]

    The ARRL Board of Directors will elect officers when it meets for its
    2020 annual meeting on January 17 - 18 in Windsor, Connecticut. The
    Board will hear nominations and then vote, as necessary, for ARRL
    president, first and second vice presidents, international affairs vice
    president, secretary, treasurer, chief executive officer, and chief
    financial officer. The Board will also choose members to serve on the
    Executive Committee and on the ARRL Foundation. Successful candidates
    will take office after the Board meeting adjourns.

    Some new faces will be around the table. The ARRL Southeastern Division
    has entirely new leadership.

    Southeastern
    Division Vice
    Director James
    Schilling,
    KG4JSZ. [Michelle
    Patnode, W3MVP,
    photo]

    In last year's elections, Mickey Baker, N4MB, defeated Greg Sarratt,
    W4OZK, to become the new Southeastern Division Director, while James
    Schilling, KG4JSZ, won a three-way race for Vice Director.

    In the Southwest Division, new Vice Director Mark Weiss, K6FG, was the
    sole candidate to succeed Ned Stearns, AA7A, who decided not to stand
    for another term.

    The Board will hear officers' reports and receive financial reports.
    Members will also hear reports from ARRL's Washington Counsel, David
    Siddall, K3ZJ, and from its Connecticut Counsel.

    Southwestern
    Division Vice
    Director Mark
    Weiss, K6FG.
    [Michelle
    Patnode, W3MVP,
    photo]

    The Board will also receive and consider reports and recommendations
    from committees and coordinators.

    ditionally, the Board will consider recommendations of the Standing
    Committees, including the Executive Committee, the ministration and
    Finance Committee, and the Programs and Services Committee and consider
    additional recommendations as contained in reports.

    The meeting will hear any motions that the 15 individual Directors may
    offer for Board consideration.

    US Air Force Space Fence Nearing Operational Acceptance

    According to NASA's most recent Orbital Debris Quarterly News, the
    space agency calculates about 17.6 million pounds of objects are in
    earth orbit, a number that will grow as launches proliferate --
    including thousands of small satellites -- presenting a huge problem.
    The US Air Force Space Fence -- a second-generation space surveillance
    system now nearing completion -- is expected to play a crucial role.

    Space Fence is located on Kwajalein
    Atoll in the Marshall Islands. [US
    Army photo]

    Using advanced solid-state S-band radar technology, Space Fence is
    located on Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands. Such critical
    space-based technologies as weather forecasting, banking, global
    communications, and GPS navigation are under threat from space junk
    orbiting Earth. Collisions already are frequent, and defunct satellites
    and rocket boosters have increased the amount of space debris.

    The Air Force Space Surveillance Network tracks about 25,000 objects.
    When Space Fence comes online, the catalog will expand considerably,
    and when fully operational, it will be the world's largest and most
    advanced radar system, offering unprecedented space situational
    awareness. Beyond cataloging objects, Space Fence will detect closely
    spaced objects, breakups, maneuvers, launches, and more.

    Contractor Lockheed Martin reported last spring that Space Fence was
    able to detect debris from a microsatellite destroyed by India as part
    of an anti-satellite test. It then was able to determine the orbit of
    the remnants and predict when the space junk would pass through the
    fence again.

    Space Fence is expected to become fully operational this year. --
    Thanks to AMSAT News Service via Milsat Magazine; Lockheed Martin
    Puerto Rico Earthquake Relief Effort Continues, with Help from Ham
    Radio

    In Puerto Rico, Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) volunteers
    continue to operate from the American Red Cross distribution center in
    Yauco -- one of the towns hit the hardest by the recent earthquakes and
    ongoing aftershocks on the island. The Red Cross requested assistance
    last week to identify undeclared refugee camps and to report on closed
    or damaged roadways and bridges. ARES District 5

    Volunteers Eduardo Hernandez, WP4RAF
    (left), and Herb Perez, WP4ZZ.
    [Photo courtesy of Oscar Resto,
    KP4RF]

    Emergency Coordinator Herb Perez, WP4ZZ, who is among those
    volunteering for the Red Cross at Yauco, reported on January 14 that
    he, Melvin Velazquez, WP4RAP, and Yolanda Garcia, WP4QZF, were on duty
    there.

    "Today, we were able to occupy our space with no major incident other
    than the usual shaking of the entire structure. More than 10 per hour,"
    Perez said. "One of our members, Jared Martinez, KP4LCO, was able to
    search near his hometown of Lajas and was able to locate more than 10
    unidentified campsites around the area." Perez said such reports enable
    the Red Cross to provide necessary assistance to those left homeless as
    a result of the earthquakes.

    Perez said volunteers were able to collect food from a church-run food
    pantry in Sabana Grande for isolated communities in the mountain
    region. He said local members of the General Mobile Radio Service
    (GMRS) and Citizens Band radio communities have been pitching in.

    Operations from Yauco have been on VHF and UHF, although commercial
    telecommunication services remain in operation for the most part.
    Another station has been established at the Red Cross Headquarters in
    the capital of San Juan, which is not in the earthquake zone. Puerto
    Rico Section Manager Oscar Resto, KP4RF, said the stations are
    operating as a backbone, in the event of new or stronger earthquakes.
    HF equipment has been safely stowed if communications fail, Resto said.
    Most of Puerto Rico now has power and water.

    Puerto Rico Section Manager Oscar
    Resto, KP4RF, installs an antenna at
    Red Cross Headquarters in San Juan.

    ARRL is shipping six VHF/UHF base/repeater antennas and six 50-foot
    rolls of LMR-400 coax through the Ham Aid Fund. Resto said a new Red
    Cross warehouse will be placed in Mayagez, where he will install a
    third station for backbone communication. "That is the reason for the
    new antennas," he said. "We already have the radios. In case we need to
    escalate to HF, we are ready with ARRL go-kits from Hurricane Maria."

    A lot of seismic activity was reported on January 15. "Many more or
    less 3.1 quakes were felt during the day," Perez said. That included a
    magnitude 5.1 temblor that shook the facilities.

    The ARES team in Yauco has also been handling health-and-welfare
    traffic from the earthquake zone. Operations are running from 9 AM
    until 5 PM each day.

    A magnitude 6.4 earthquake struck the southwestern part of Puerto Rico
    on January 7, fast on the heels of a magnitude 5.8 tremor the day
    before. The worst-impacted cities were Guayanilla, Pe¤uelas, Yauco, and
    Gu nica, where most homes are no longer habitable.

    2019 ARRL Periodicals Available on DVD and via Download

    The 2019 ARRL Periodicals DVD is now available and includes the
    complete, fully searchable collection of three ARRL publications --
    QST, the official membership journal of ARRL, QEX Forum for
    Communications Experimenters, and National Contest Journal (NCJ). In
    addition, the DVD includes source code for software projects and PC
    board patterns; Section News, and the ever-popular Contest Soapbox and
    Contest Results.

    Search the full text of every article by entering titles, call signs,
    or names. See every word, photo, drawing, and table in technical and
    general-interest features, columns and product reviews, plus all
    advertisements. Print what you see, or copy it into other applications.
    System requirements: Microsoft Windows and Macintosh systems, using
    obe Acrobat Reader software.

    The 2019 ARRL Periodicals DVD is available from the ARRL Store or your
    ARRL Dealer. (ARRL Item no. 1274, ISBN: 978-1-62595-127-4, $24.95
    retail, plus shipping. Call 860-594-0355 or toll-free in the US,
    888-277-5289. 2019 ARRL Periodicals is also available as a download in
    a Windows version (ARRL Item no. 1274_WD) and Mac/Linux version (ARRL
    Item no. 1274_MLD).
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: Solar Cycle 25 sunspots persisted on
    January 9 - 10, with daily sunspot numbers of 14 and 11, respectively.
    This brought the weekly average daily sunspot number from 8.4 last week
    to 3.6 this week. Average daily solar flux edged up from 71.8 to 72.5.

    The average daily planetary A index declined from 6.3 to 5.6, and the
    average middle latitude A index went from 5.3 to 3.7.

    Predicted solar flux for the next 45 days is 71 on January 16 - 18; 70
    on January 19 - 23; 72 on January 24 - 25; 70 on January 26 - February
    7; 72 on February 8 - 22, and 70 on February 23 - 29.

    Predicted planetary A index is 5 on January 16 - 18; 8 on January 19 -
    20; 5 on January 21 - 31; 8 on February 1 - 2; 5 on February 3; 10 on
    February 4 - 6; 5 on February 7 - 9; 10 on February 10 - 11; 5 on
    February 12 - 22; 8 on February 23 - 24; 5 on February 25 - 27, and 8
    on February 28 - 29.

    Sunspot numbers for January 9 - 15 were 14, 11, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0, with
    a mean of 3.6. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 74.4, 72.8, 73.5, 71.9,
    71.5, 71.9, and 71.2, with a mean of 72.5. Estimated planetary A
    indices were 12, 7, 6, 4, 3, 3, and 4, with a mean of 5.6. The middle
    latitude A index was 8, 6, 4, 2, 2, 2, and 2, with a mean of 3.7.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * January 17 -- LZ Open Contest (CW)
    * January 18 -- RSGB AFS Contest, SSB
    * January 18 -- WAB 1.8 MHz Phone/CW
    * January 18 - 19 -- Hungarian DX Contest (CW, phone)
    * January 18 - 19 -- North American QSO Party, SSB
    * January 18 - 19 -- NA Collegiate Championship, SSB
    * January 18 - 19 -- Feld Hell Sprint
    * January 18 - 20 -- ARRL January VHF Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * January 20 -- Run for the Bacon QRP Contest (CW)
    * January 22 -- SKCC Sprint (CW)
    * January 23 -- NAQCC CW Sprint

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on amateur radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    YOTA Month Reported a Success in the Americas

    For several years now, Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) has sponsored YOTA
    Month each December, primarily involving young radio amateurs in Europe
    and Africa. In December, youth-operated amateur radio stations in the
    Americas picked up the ball to contribute more than 12,000 contacts to
    the worldwide event. Eighteen operators aged 25 or younger deployed
    special event 1 * 1 call signs -- K8Y, K8O, K8T, and K8A -- to promote
    youth in amateur radio. Fifteen young operators across the US took
    turns using these call signs throughout December. They logged 10,474
    contacts using those call signs on SSB, CW, digital modes, and
    satellites. Some operators also aired the call signs during contests.
    Participants in the Americas offered opinions on what made the event
    special for them.

    "Operating-wise, it was definitely the pileups...I love a good pileup,"
    said Mason Matrazzo, KM4SII. "Apart from that, it was great getting to
    be part of a group of youngsters that are all into the hobby. Even
    though we weren't physically working together, we all got to be part of
    the YOTA program over the air."

    Audrey McElroy, KM4BUN, also cited the on-air camaraderie. "My favorite
    part of YOTA month was getting the wonderful experience of talking to
    other youth all over the world and sharing our experiences," she said.
    "It gives us hope to know the future of amateur radio is in the hands
    of these great kids." Her brother Jack, KM4ZIA, also took part.

    In Canada, David Samu, VE7DZO, signed VE7YOTA in December, making 458
    contacts on CW. "My favorite part was seeing all the YOTA stations on
    the air throughout December and seeing all the high energy youth
    activity," he said.

    YOTA Month in the Americas
    Coordinator Bryant Rascoll, KG5HVO,
    at WRTC-2018.

    Mathias Acevedo, CE2LR, activated XR2YOTA, and met another young
    operator from Chile, Manu Pardo, CA3MPR, through YOTA month. Between
    them, they put 1,535 contacts into the log on CW, SSB, and digital
    modes.

    Bryant Rascoll, KG5HVO, coordinated the efforts of the 17 participants
    and the logs for the US stations. "I learned much during the month
    about the importance of teamwork and communication...just like
    baseball," Bryant said about his role as coordinator. "I think YOTA
    month was a great success considering the short amount of time we had
    to plan this all out. I had a lot of fun operating this event, but it
    was even more rewarding to see other youth here in the Americas make
    tons of QSOs during December."

    The first Youth On The Air camp in the US will take place June 21 - 26
    at the National Voice of America Museum of Broadcasting in West Chester
    Township, Ohio. Read more.

    Nominations Solicited for Six ARRL Awards

    ARRL is inviting nominations for awards that recognize educational and
    technological pursuits in amateur radio. Nominations are also open for
    ARRL's premier award to honor a young licensee.
    * The Hiram Percy Maxim Award recognizes a radio amateur and ARRL
    member younger than age 21, whose accomplishments and contributions
    are of the most exemplary nature within the framework of amateur
    radio activities. Nominations for this award are made through ARRL
    Section Managers, who will forward nominations to ARRL
    Headquarters. The deadline is March 31, 2020.
    * The ARRL Herb S. Brier Instructor of the Year Award honors an ARRL
    volunteer amateur radio instructor or ARRL professional classroom
    teacher who uses creative instructional approaches and reflects the
    highest values of the amateur radio community. The award highlights
    quality of and commitment to licensing instruction. Nominations are
    due by March 16, 2020.
    * The ARRL Microwave Development Award pays tribute to a radio
    amateur or group of radio amateurs who contribute to the
    development of the amateur radio microwave bands. The nomination
    deadline is March 31, 2020.
    * The ARRL Technical Service Award recognizes an individual radio
    amateur or group of radio amateurs who provide amateur radio
    technical assistance or training. The nomination deadline is March
    31, 2020.
    * The ARRL Technical Innovation Award is conferred on an individual
    radio amateur or group of radio amateurs who develop and apply new
    technical ideas or techniques in amateur radio. The nomination
    deadline is March 31, 2020.
    * The Knight Distinguished Service Award recognizes exceptional
    contributions by a Section Manager to the health and vitality of
    ARRL. The nomination deadline is April 30, 2020.

    The ARRL Board of Directors selects award recipients, and winners are
    typically announced following the Board's July meeting. More
    information about these awards on the ARRL website, or contact Steve
    Ewald, WV1X, telephone (860) 594-0265.
    In Brief...

    W1AW will be on the air for Winter Field Day. Members of the Warren
    County (New York) Amateur Radio Club (W2WCR) will activate Maxim
    Memorial Station W1AW for Winter Field Day 2020 over the January 25 -
    26 weekend. Winter Field Day is sponsored by the Winter Field Day
    Association (WFDA), which believes that emergency communication is
    important throughout the year. Winter Field Day is open to radio
    amateurs worldwide. The WFDA's goal is to help enhance operating skills
    and to prepare participants for all environmental conditions. Winter
    Field Day runs for 24 hours. Station set-up may start no earlier than
    1900 UTC on the day before the event and may not take any longer than
    12 hours in total. Expect activity on all amateur bands except 12, 17,
    30, and 60 meters. All modes that can handle the required exchange are
    welcome; this does not include FT8. Entry categories include indoor,
    outdoor, and home. Full details are on the Winter Field Day website.

    The free ARRL Events app, which will be featured at Orlando HamCation,
    is now available for both Apple iOS and Android devices. A web-browser
    version, optimized for nearly any browser or other mobile device type,
    is also available to view. Orlando HamCation 2020 takes place February
    7 - 9 and has been sanctioned as the 2020 ARRL Northern Florida Section
    Convention. Hosted annually by the Orlando Amateur Radio Club,
    HamCation is one of the largest annual amateur radio gatherings in the
    US.

    Marvin Hoffman, WA4NC, will take over this spring as ARRL North
    Carolina Section Manager. Hoffman, of Boone, was the sole nominee to
    succeed incumbent Section Manager Karl Bowman, W4CHX, of Raleigh, who
    decided not to run for a new term after serving since 2014. Because no
    challengers came forward by the nomination deadline, no contested SM
    elections took place during the winter election cycle. These incumbent
    Section Managers will begin new terms in 2020: John Fritze, K2QY,
    Eastern New York; George Miller, W3GWM, Eastern Pennsylvania; John Mark
    Robertson, K5JMR, Louisiana; Joe Speroni, AH0A, Pacific; Dave
    Kaltenborn, N8KBC, San Diego; Chris Stallkamp, KI0D, South Dakota, and
    Joe Palsa, K3WRY, Virginia. New 2-year terms of office begin on April
    1.

    The fourth annual AM Rally operating event will take place February 1 -
    3 (UTC). The annual AM Rally encourages all operators to explore
    amateur radio's original voice mode by showcasing the various types of
    AM equipment in use today, ranging from early vacuum-tube rigs to the
    newest SDR-based transceivers. "Both new and experienced ops are
    discovering that AM can sound quite good, enhancing the enjoyment of
    contacts," said Clark Burgard, N1BCG, an enthusiastic promoter of the
    event. "The AM Rally provides a great reason to give it a try." The AM
    Rally is open to all radio amateurs capable of running full-carrier,
    amplitude modulation (standard AM) using any type of radio equipment --
    modern, vintage, tube, solid-state, software-defined, military, boat
    anchor, broadcast, homebrew, or commercially manufactured -- are
    encouraged to join in the AM fun on 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, and 6
    meters. Details are on the AM Rally website or contact Burgard via
    email. The AM Rally is sponsored by ARRL, Radio Engineering Associates,
    and iNetRadio.

    An international team of 10 operators will be active as W8S from Swains
    Island from March 10 to March 25. The DXpedtion team will be active on
    all HF bands on CW, SSB, FT8, and RTTY. Operation will be from two
    separate camps on the island -- a Red Camp and a Blue Camp -- each with
    two stations. The four stations will be on the air 24/7. The station
    equipment complements are identical. Two stations will be dedicated for
    160 and 80 meters. A WiFi network will link the Red and Blue camps to
    network all logging laptops. Hans Griessl, DL6JGN, and Ronald Stuy,
    PA3EWP, are co-leaders. Swains Island (Olohega) is an atoll in the
    Tokelau chain. Swains is a US territory and considered part of American
    Samoa. Swains Island is the 34th most-wanted DXCC entity, according to
    Club Log.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * January 17 - 18 -- North Texas Section Convention, Forest Hill,
    Texas
    * January 19 - 25 -- Quartzfest, Quartzsite, Arizona
    * January 25 -- ARRL Midwest Conference, Collinsville, Illinois
    * February 1 -- South Carolina State Convention, North Charleston,
    South Carolina
    * February 1 -- Virginia State Convention, Richmond, VA
    * February 7 - 9 -- Northern Florida Section Convention, Orlando,
    Florida
    * February 14 - 15 -- Southwest Division Convention, Yuma, Arizona

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

    .

    .
    * Join or Renew Today! ARRL membership includes QST, amateur radio's
    most popular and informative journal, delivered to your mailbox
    each month.
    * Listen to ARRL Audio News, available every Friday.

    Subscribe to...
    * NCJ -- National Contest Journal. Published bimonthly, features
    articles by top contesters, letters, hints, statistics, scores, NA
    Sprint, and QSO parties.
    * QEX -- A Forum for Communications Experimenters. Published
    bimonthly, features technical articles, construction projects,
    columns, and other items of interest to radio amateurs and
    communications professionals.

    Free of charge to ARRL members...
    * Subscribe to the ARES E-Letter (monthly public service and
    emergency communications news), the ARRL Contest Update (biweekly
    contest newsletter), Division and Section news alerts -- and much
    more!
    * Find ARRL on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter and Instagram!
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    The ARRL Letter is published Thursdays, 50 times each year. ARRL members
    and registered guests may subscribe at no cost or unsubscribe by editing
    their profile.

    Copyright (c) 2020 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
    distribution of this publication, or any portion thereof, is permitted for
    non-commercial or educational purposes, with attribution. All other
    purposes require written permission.


    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Jan 24 09:05:02 2020
    The ARRL Letter
    January 23, 2020

    * Barry Shelley, N1VXY, is ARRL Interim CEO
    * ARES Volunteers Establish "Plan B" Communication Network in Puerto
    Rico
    * Massachusetts Club Offers Support to Arecibo Observatory Following
    Earthquakes
    * New Book from ARRL: Amateur Radio Contesting for Beginners
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * IARU Region 1 Youngsters On The Air Summer Camp 2020 Will Be in
    Croatia
    * AMSAT: GOLF-TEE Initiative Meets Major Milestone
    * ITU Development Sector Publication Highlights Amateur Radio's Role
    in Emergency Communication
    * ARISS Opens Window for ISS Ham Radio Contact Proposals on February
    1
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    Barry Shelley, N1VXY, is ARRL Interim CEO

    At its January 17 - 18 meeting, the ARRL Board of Directors did not
    elect Howard Michel, WB2ITX, as the ARRL Chief Executive Officer.

    As of January 20, Barry Shelley, N1VXY, became interim CEO. Mr. Shelley
    was ARRL's Chief Financial Officer for 28 years and CEO during 2018
    before his retirement.

    The Board has created a search committee to select the next CEO. More
    details on this and other matters that took place at the Board meeting
    will be released shortly.
    ARES Volunteers Establish "Plan B" Communication Network in Puerto Rico

    Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES^(R)) volunteers in Puerto Rico
    continued over the weekend to report for daily duty at an American Red
    Cross (ARC) distribution center in Mayagez and at ARC Headquarters in
    San Juan. The two sites are ready to provide a "Plan B" communication
    backbone in the event the seismic situation worsens. A magnitude 6.4
    earthquake struck southwestern Puerto Rico on January 7, fast on the
    heels of a magnitude 5.8 tremor the day before, damaging homes in
    Guayanilla, Pe¤uelas, Yauco, and Gu nica. ARRL Puerto Rico Section
    Manager Oscar Resto, KP4RF, told ARRL this week that the situation is
    relatively "calm and quiet" for now and starting on January 22,
    volunteers began monitoring from their homes or vehicles, permitting
    most, including Resto himself, to get back to their jobs and homes.

    ARES volunteers had been deployed to an ARC distribution center in
    Yauco, but that part of the operation was shifted to Mayagez over the
    weekend, because it was considered safer there. An ARRL-provided
    VHF/UHF radio and antenna have been set up at the Mayagez facility.
    Resto said a second operating position is being added at the San Juan
    ARC Headquarters site.

    Resto said Red Cross officials know that they can rely on amateur
    radio, if the situation calls for it, but for now commercial
    communications are fully operational, although aftershocks from the
    January 7 quake persist. "In case the situation escalates, the ARES
    team will immediately mobilize at the ARC sites and establish
    communication (VHF/UHF or HF) as required," Resto said.

    The ARRL Ham
    Aid program
    provided this
    antenna,
    installed in
    Mayagez.
    [Oscar Resto,
    KP4RF, photo]

    Last week, the Red Cross had requested assistance from the ARES
    volunteers as well as volunteers from the CB radio and GMRS
    communities, to identify undeclared refugee camps and to report on
    close or damaged roadways and bridges. Resto said the ARES volunteers
    "did a marvelous job" that earned praise from Red Cross officials.

    Resto said about two dozen volunteers have made themselves available in
    the Mayagez area. In the event they're needed, Resto said, he has
    seven or eight HF radios and 15 VHF/UHF transceivers left over from the
    Hurricane Maria emergency response. He said the HF equipment has been
    safely stowed for use in case of another major earthquake, when they
    might be needed.

    He was expecting additional antennas and feed lines provided through
    ARRL's Ham Aid program to show up this week.

    Massachusetts Club Offers Support to Arecibo Observatory Following
    Earthquakes

    Although not in the hardest-hit earthquake zone, Puerto Rico's Arecibo
    Observatory nonetheless has been affected by the recent spate of
    earthquakes and aftershocks. The landmark Arecibo radio telescope and
    ionospheric radar facility was a victim of the devastation wrought by
    Hurricane Maria in 2017.

    Members of the Nashoba Valley Amateur Radio Club (NVARC) have stepped
    up to assist in support and recovery efforts for the Arecibo
    Observatory radio telescope and ionospheric radar facility. NVARC
    members Phil Erickson, W1PJE; Rod Hersh, WA1TAC, and Jim Wilber, AB1WQ,
    participated in daily scheduled radio contacts with Arecibo's lead
    telescope operator and spectrum manager, Angel Vazquez, WP3R. Other
    NVARC members volunteered to serve as back-up stations.

    "All AO staff members are safe, and our technical teams have completed
    preliminary visual analysis of the primary structure and have found no
    immediate damage/issues, however a more detailed inspection needs to be
    completed once the aftershocks subside," said Francisco C¢rdova,
    Arecibo Observatory's director, at the University of Central Florida.

    Site operations were suspended and access was limited to essential
    personnel, according to the latest information available from the
    Arecibo Observatory website.

    Over several days, when commercial power and water were not available
    near Arecibo, club members inquired about potential assistance.
    Although conditions are slowly improving on the northern portion of the
    island where the observatory is located, Vazquez noted that thousands
    of people displaced from their homes in the hard-hit southern part of
    the island had to camp outside, due to extensive structural damage and
    ongoing aftershocks.

    NVARC members were also able to provide messages of support from MIT's
    Haystack Observatory in Westford, Massachusetts, and from program
    officers at the National Science Foundation (NSF) Geospace Facilities
    Division in Washington, DC. NSF funds the observation programs and
    scientific research at Arecibo Observatory. NVARC said the radio
    contacts would continue as the recovery proceeds.
    New Book from ARRL: Amateur Radio Contesting for Beginners

    Contesting is one of the most exciting aspects of amateur radio -- and
    for some, it's their primary ham radio activity. Amateur Radio
    Contesting for Beginners by contesting veteran Doug Grant, K1DG, offers
    practical information and ideas that will help you get started in
    contesting -- "radiosport" -- or to build your skills, if you're
    already active.

    Contesting tests station capability and operator skill, and it really
    is a sport, with a typical objective of contacting as many stations and
    multipliers -- ARRL Sections, states, grids, or DXCC entities, for
    example -- within the contest period.

    "Doug Grant has written the ideal guide for anyone interested in
    contesting," said QST Editor Steve Ford, WB8IMY.

    Grant's book explains what equipment you need, typical contest formats,
    details of some more popular events, operating techniques, how to
    submit an entry, and how to improve your scores. No matter how modest
    your station or experience, you can compete too!

    Just ahead is Winter Field Day, January 25 - 26. See the ARRL Contest
    Calendar for information on other events.

    Amateur Radio Contesting for Beginners is available from the ARRL Store
    or your ARRL Dealer. (ARRL Item no. 1243, ISBN: 978-1-62595-124-3,
    $27.95 retail, special ARRL Member Price $24.95). Call 860-594-0355 or,
    toll-free in the US, 888-277-5289. It's also available as an e-book for
    the Amazon Kindle.

    For more information about ARRL-sponsored contests, including rules and
    results, and to view the contest photo gallery, visit the ARRL Contests
    page.

    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: No sunspots appeared over the January
    16 - 22 reporting week. On January 22, Spaceweather.com reported the
    consecutive period of spotless days is 11, but all recent sunspots have
    had Cycle 25 polarity.

    The average daily solar flux dipped from 72.5 to 71.2. The average
    daily planetary A index went from 5.6 to 4.1, and the middle latitude A
    index dropped from 3.7 to 3.

    Predicted solar flux is 72 on January 23 - February 5; 71 on February 6
    - 20; 72 on February 21 - March 3; 71 on March 4, and 70 on March 5 -
    7.

    Predicted planetary A index is 5 on January 23 - 31; 10 on February 1 -
    5; 5 on February 6 - 27; 10 on February 28 - March 3, and 5 on March 4
    - 7.

    When there are no sunspots, 160 meters seems to improve, probably
    because of lower associated geomagnetic activity. The CW portion of the
    CQ World Wide 160-Meter Contest takes place this weekend.

    Sunspot numbers for January 16 - 22 were 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, and 0, with
    a mean of 0. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 71.8, 70.1, 71.3, 71.8, 71.2,
    70.5, and 71.9, with a mean of 71.2. Estimated planetary A indices were
    5, 3, 4, 3, 2, 6, and 6, with a mean of 4.1. Middle latitude A index
    was 4, 2, 3, 2, 2, 4, and 4, with a mean of 3.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * January 23 -- NAQCC CW Sprint
    * January 24 - 26 -- CQ 160-Meter Contest (CW)
    * January 25 - 26 -- REF Contest (CW)
    * January 25 - 26 -- BARTG RTTY Sprint
    * January 25 - 26 -- UBA DX Contest, SSB
    * January 25 - 26 -- Winter Field Day (CW, phone, digital)
    * January 27 -- QCX Challenge (CW)
    * January 29 -- UKEICC 80-Meter Contest (CW)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on amateur radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.

    IARU Region 1 Youngsters On The Air Summer Camp 2020 Will Be in Croatia

    The 10th annual Youngsters On The Air (YOTA) camp will be held this
    summer in Karlovac, Croatia -- not far from the capital city of Zagreb
    -- International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) Region 1 Youth Working
    Group Chair Lisa Leenders, PA2LS, has announced. The Croatian Amateur
    Radio Association -- Croatia's IARU member-society -- will serve as
    host of the August 8 - 15 event. Participation is aimed at young radio
    amateurs living in IARU Region 1 (Europe, Africa, and the Middle East).

    "In this YOTA Camp we will be continuing with our train-the-trainer
    (TTT) program, which will be the main theme of the week," Leenders
    said. "Participants will be working on the future of amateur radio and
    will be involved in workshops where they gain skills to start similar
    amateur radio youth events when they are back home. With this, we are
    aiming to create a snowball effect, so there will be more and more YOTA
    events all over the world. This also allows other youngsters and
    newcomers to enjoy amateur radio."

    Leenders said camp participants will also be able to enjoy getting on
    the air, as well as building electronic kits.

    Each IARU member-society in Region 1 is invited to sponsor teams of up
    to four camp participants. Team members will be age 15 to 25 and not
    have attended a previous YOTA camp. Overall participation is limited to
    80 campers.

    The inaugural Youth On The Air Camp in the Americas will take place
    this June 21 - 26 at the National Voice of America Museum of
    Broadcasting in West Chester Township, Ohio. For more information,
    email Camp Director Neil Rapp, WB9VPG, or call 812-327-0749.
    AMSAT: GOLF-TEE Initiative Meets Major Milestone

    AMSAT reports that an array of GOLF-TEE (Greater Orbit Larger Footprint
    - Technology Evaluation Environment) satellite prototype boards
    transmitted telemetry for the first time on January 14.

    "The boards are laid out on a bench as a 'flat-sat,' with
    interconnecting wires, bench power supplies, and a dummy load on the
    transmitter," AMSAT said. The interconnected boards include an early
    radiation-tolerant internal housekeeping unit (IHU, i.e., computer)
    prototype; a control interface prototype, and a set of spare boards
    from HuskySat-1 that act as prototypes for the legacy IHU and legacy
    VHF/UHF RF components.

    "Now that the development team has reached this point, it has RF to use
    as a basis for developing a GOLF-TEE decoder for FoxTelem, the ground
    telemetry receiver software," AMSAT said. "Thousands of hours of work
    by many AMSAT volunteers have gone into the hardware and software that
    got GOLF-TEE this far, with much work yet to be done before flight
    units are ready."

    GOLF-TEE is designed as a low-Earth orbit testbed for technologies
    necessary for successful CubeSat missions to a wide variety of orbits,
    including medium- and high-Earth orbits. "Higher is clearly better when
    it comes to amateur radio satellites," AMSAT says on its website
    explanation of the GOLF program. "The larger footprint, which brings
    more DX opportunities and more good passes per day, also provides for a
    longer orbital lifetime, and slower motion across the sky. This results
    in longer pass durations and easier tracking." Higher orbits introduce
    a new set of engineering challenges, AMSAT concedes, including higher
    power and antennas with greater gain.

    "GOLF is designed to continue the growth of AMSAT's CubeSat abilities,
    incorporating new systems such as software-defined radios and
    deployable solar panels into a 3U spaceframe." AMSAT explained. "GOLF
    will also continue AMSAT's educational partnership outreach that takes
    advantage of the synergies that amateur radio satellites and education
    have to offer the public."

    AMSAT has invited donations to further the project. It's also seeking
    additional volunteers. -- Thanks to AMSAT News Service

    ITU Development Sector Publication Highlights Amateur Radio's Role in
    Emergency Communication

    Amateur radio is featured in the publication ITU Guidelines for
    national emergency telecommunication plans, published by the
    International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Development Sector (ITU-D).
    The publication notes that radio amateurs have supported communication
    in emergency situations on a voluntary basis since the dawn of radio.

    "They are experts in radio communications and have the equipment,
    skills, and necessary frequencies allocated by ITU to deploy networks
    in emergency events quickly and efficiently," the publication says.
    ITU-D said amateur radio support offers "great coverage due to the
    large number of amateur radio stations available;" training programs
    and exercises that have been developed for emergency communication;
    "qualified temporary volunteers who provide skills and experience
    essential for emergency telecommunications;" problem-solving skills for
    working with "often very limited resources," and the ability to work
    with alternative power sources.

    Past ARRL President and IARU Secretary Rod Stafford, W6ROD, represents
    the International Amateur Radio Union at ITU-D meetings. -- Thanks to
    Southgate Amateur Radio News; IARU
    ARISS Opens Window for ISS Ham Radio Contact Proposals on February 1

    Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is once again
    seeking formal and informal education institutions and organizations --
    individually or working together -- interested in hosting an amateur
    radio contact with an International Space Station (ISS) crew member. A
    window to accept proposals will open on February 1 for contacts that
    would be scheduled between January and June 2021. The majority of ARISS
    contacts involve schools and educational institutions. ARISS is looking
    for organizations able to attract a large number of participants that
    can integrate the contact opportunity into a well-developed education
    plan.

    "ARISS contacts afford education audiences the opportunity to learn
    firsthand from astronauts what it is like to live and work in space and
    to learn about space research conducted on the ISS," ARISS said in
    announcing the proposal period. "Students will also have an opportunity
    to learn about satellite communication, wireless technology, and radio
    science."

    Proposal information and documents are available on the ARISS website.
    Two identical ARISS introductory webinars have been set for January 23
    at 9 PM EST (0200 UTC on January 24) and for January 27 at 6 PM EST
    (2300 UTC). Registration is required.

    Contacts with ISS crew members run approximately 10 minutes in length
    and allow students to interact with the astronauts through a
    question-and-answer session. ARISS contacts are voice-only amateur
    radio communication opportunities. Schools and organizations typically
    work with a local amateur radio club to assist in handling the
    technical aspects of carrying out a successful contact with the ISS.

    Astronaut Reid Wiseman, KF5LKT, on
    the air at NA1SS on board the ISS in
    2014. [NASA, photo]

    ARISS stresses that because of the nature of human spaceflight and the
    complexity of scheduling activities aboard the ISS, schools and
    organizations must be flexible in accommodating changes in radio
    contact dates and times.

    "Amateur radio organizations around the world with the support of NASA
    and space agencies in Russia, Canada, Japan, and Europe present
    educational organizations with this opportunity," ARISS said. "The ham
    radio organizations' volunteer efforts provide the equipment and
    operational support to enable communication between crew on the ISS and
    students around the world using amateur radio."

    Proposal information and more details are available on the ARISS
    website. Contact ARISS with any questions.
    In Brief...

    The ARRL Events app is available to use with Apple iOS and Android
    devices. A web-browser version, optimized for most browsers and other
    types of mobile devices, is also available. ARRL Events will be
    featured at Orlando HamCation 2020, February 7 - 9, which has been
    sanctioned as the 2020 ARRL Northern Florida Section Convention.

    The Perseverance DX Group VP8PJ DXpedition to South Orkney has received
    permission from the National Science Foundation to land and camp on the
    Antarctic island. Receipt of the Antarctic Conservation Act Permit
    culminates a months-long approval process involving several
    governmental agencies. VP8PJ is expected to commence operation on
    February 20 and continue until March 5. The DXpedition's equipment
    container arrived by sea in Punta Arenas, Chile, on January 13, and the
    MV Braveheart will transport the operating team and the gear from there
    to the South Orkneys and back. Set-up on the island is expected to take
    2 days. Contact the DXpedition for more information.

    The Lagunaria DX Group is planning a "large-scale DXpedition" to
    Timor-Leste (4W) in the October/November 2020 timeframe. "We currently
    have one team member in Timor-Leste negotiating with different
    ministries, companies, and accommodation facilities," said team member
    Chris Janssen, DL1MGB. "Right now, we have positive feedback from all.
    We even already have a confirmed reservation for two close-by lodges to
    have enough space to host up to 10 stations." Janssen said the team
    will consist of 18 operators and will participate seriously in both CQ
    World Wide DX contests this fall. ditional details will be available
    soon on the DXpedition website. Timor-Leste is the 67th most-wanted
    DXCC entity, according to Club Log. -- Thanks to The Daily DX

    A team of German DXers will operate as HU1DL from the Central American
    country of El Salvador, starting in late January and continuing until
    February 13. "Everything is well prepared. We are ready!" said an
    announcement from Rolf Thieme, DL7VEE. The team will be transporting
    its own equipment, which will include Elecraft K3 transceivers and
    full-power amplifiers. Three stations will be on the air around the
    clock on CW, SSB, RTTY, and FT8, with a focus on the lower bands.
    Thieme said HU1DL will operate mostly in FT8 fox/hound mode. HU1DL
    plans to be active on 60 meters, CW, and FT8. -- Thanks to The Daily DX

    Spanish radio amateurs may exchange their current longer-format call
    signs for permanent 2 * 1 call signs, and some familiar Spanish call
    signs are likely to be changing. Salva Moreno, EA5BB, told ARRL that
    hams in Spain who decided to make the change are now awaiting the
    official license documents, so they can use their new call signs on the
    air. Moreno's new call sign will be EA5U. To be eligible, applicants
    must have held a license issued by Spanish authorities without any
    sanctions and have at least 15 years of experience in "international
    amateur radio."

    The 17th International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) High Speed Telegraphy
    (HST) World Championship will take place August 20 - 24 in Ulaanbaatar,
    Mongolia. Europe's HST Cup and Balkan HST Championships will take place
    May 8 - 12 in Elbasan, Albania. Although not an IARU-recognized event,
    this international competition is widely accepted by the HST community
    as an opportunity for top competitors to check their form before the
    world championship, for teams to test new candidates for a national
    team, and for those unable to participate at the World Championship to
    still enjoy top-level competition. -- Thanks to IARU Region 1

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * January 25 -- ARRL Midwest Conference, Collinsville, Illinois
    * February 1 -- South Carolina State Convention, North Charleston,
    South Carolina
    * February 1 -- Virginia State Convention, Richmond, VA
    * February 7 - 9 -- Northern Florida Section Convention, Orlando,
    Florida
    * February 14 - 15 -- Southwest Division Convention, Yuma, Arizona
    * March 7 - Delta Division Convention, Russellville, Arkansas
    * March 13 - 14 -- North Carolina Section Convention, Concord, North
    Carolina
    * March 14 - 15 -- Great Lakes Division Convention, Perrysburg, OH
    * March 14 -- Nebraska State Convention, Lincoln, NE
    * March 14 -- West Virginia Section Convention, Charleston, West
    Virginia
    * March 21 -- West Texas Section Convention, Midland, Texas

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

    .

    .
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    Free of charge to ARRL members...
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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

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    Copyright (c) 2020 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
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    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Jan 31 09:05:02 2020
    The ARRL Letter
    January 30, 2020

    * ARRL to Argue for Continued Access to 3 GHz Spectrum as FCC Sets
    Comment Deadlines
    * ARRL Expands Its Roster of Online Discussion Groups
    * Yukon's VY1JA Plans to Be Back for 2020 ARRL November Sweepstakes
    CW
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * New Amateur Extra-Class Question Pool Released
    * HuskySat-1 With VHF/UHF Linear Transponder Set to Deploy Soon
    * State QSO Party Challenge Announced
    * Iowa State Parks on the Air 2020 Celebrates Centennial of Iowa
    State Parks
    * YOTA Camp 2020 in the Americas Donations Are Being Matched
    * Past ARRL Southeastern Division Director H. Dale Strieter, W4QM, SK
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    ARRL to Argue for Continued Access to 3 GHz Spectrum as FCC Sets
    Comment Deadlines

    At its annual meeting on January 17 - 18, the ARRL Board of Directors
    instructed Washington Counsel Dave Siddall, K3ZJ, to prepare a strong
    response to protect amateur access to spectrum in the 3 GHz range. In
    its Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) in WT Docket 19-348, the FCC
    proposed to relocate all non-federal operations, including amateur
    uses, to spectrum outside the 3.3 - 3.55 GHz band.

    The ARRL Board met January 17 - 18
    in Windsor, Connecticut. [Michelle
    Patnode, W3MVP, photo]

    The Commission anticipates auctioning this spectrum to expand
    commercial use of 5G cellular and wireless broadband services, if
    agreement can be reached on relocation of -- or sharing with -- the
    federal incumbents that operate in the same band. Publication of the
    NPRM in the Federal Register on January 22 established deadlines of
    February 21 for comments and March 23 for reply comments.

    The FCC has requested comment on the uses radio amateurs make of the
    spectrum and appropriate relocation options. Complicating matters is
    the fact that radio amateurs must consider the possibility that the
    immediately adjacent 3.1 - 3.3 GHz band is included in the spectrum
    that Congress has identified for similar study. FCC Commissioner
    Michael O'Rielly, in a December statement, referenced the fact that the
    lower band may also be considered for non-federal reallocation,
    potentially limiting relocation possibilities.

    Amateurs make substantial use of the 3.3 - 3.5 GHz band that would be
    hard to replicate elsewhere, and they had filed more than 150 comments
    before the designated comment period even began. Among users looking at
    options are those who use this spectrum for Earth-Moon-Earth
    (moonbounce) communication, mesh networks, experiments with
    communication over long distances, radiosport, and amateur television.
    A portion of the band is also designated for use by amateur satellites
    in ITU Regions 2 and 3 (the Americas and Asia/Pacific).

    A report is due by March 23 from the National Telecommunications and
    Information ministration (NTIA) evaluating the feasibility of having
    federal users share all or part of the 3.1 - 3.55 GHz band with
    commercial wireless services. This report is required by the Making
    Opportunities for Broadband Investment and Limiting Excessive and
    Needless Obstacles to Wireless (MOBILE NOW) Act. The results of the
    NTIA report will impact how much spectrum ultimately may be
    re-allocated for auction to wireless providers.

    ARRL urges amateurs who comment to inform the FCC about the uses they
    make of the 3 GHz spectrum. Short comments and longer statements may be
    filed electronically. Visit the FCC "How to Comment on FCC Proceedings"
    page for more information. Commenters should reference WT Docket
    19-348.
    ARRL Expands Its Roster of Online Discussion Groups

    ARRL's Committee on Communication with Members has launched three new
    online discussion forums as part of its ongoing efforts to enhance and
    improve communication between ARRL leadership and members or
    prospective members. The new forums, which focus on antenna law,
    regulatory issues, and support for new amateur radio licensees, will go
    live on Thursday, January 30, at 0400 UTC.

    The committee launched the three new discussion groups on the basis of
    requests from the amateur radio community, to support ARRL's efforts to
    provide more resources for beginner-to-intermediate operators.

    The online discussion program launched last fall with three forums --
    contesting, awards, and the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) --
    all open to the amateur radio community. The program was based on the
    success of the online ARRL-LoTW Group, which, for the past several
    years, has served to answer questions and generate discussions about
    ways to improve the service.
    * ARRL New England Division Director and attorney Fred Hopengarten,
    K1VR, will moderate the Antenna Law and Policy Forum. Hopengarten
    is the author of Antenna Zoning for the Radio Amateur.
    * ARRL Regulatory Affairs Manager Dan Henderson, N1ND, will moderate
    the Regulatory Affairs forum.
    * QST Editor and ARRL Publications Manager Steve Ford, WB8IMY, will
    moderate the New Hams forum.

    ARRL IT Manager Michael Keane, K1MK, worked with Groups.io to set up
    the new groups. Those wishing to subscribe must use a Groups.io
    username and password, if they have one, or create a Groups.io account
    if they don't.

    The new groups join an ARRL discussion forum lineup that already
    includes:
    * ARRL-Contesting, moderated by ARRL Contest visory Committee
    Chairman Dennis Egan, W1UE.
    * ARRL-Awards, moderated by ARRL Radiosport and Field Services
    Manager Bart Jahnke, W9JJ.
    * ARRL-IARU, moderated by IARU Secretary David Sumner, K1ZZ.
    * ARRL-LOTW, moderated by ARRL IT Manager Michael Keane, K1MK.

    Everyone who subscribes to an ARRL Group is automatically subscribed to
    "ARRL Groups," an administrative feature that allows ARRL to convey
    routine announcements to subscribers of all ARRL groups, such as
    planned system outages.

    ARRL expects to create additional online groups that focus on other
    areas of interest to radio amateurs, including ARRL activities,
    services, initiatives, and policies.

    ARRL currently hosts some "members-only" online forums that include the
    topics of Awards and Contesting. While these forums will continue to
    operate, participants are being encouraged to post new topics in the
    new groups.

    All questions will be welcome, no matter how many times they have
    already been asked and answered, or how obvious the answers might be.
    Neither personal attacks nor foul language will be tolerated. Violators
    will immediately be placed on "moderated" status, meaning their
    subsequent posts will require Moderator approval. Civility and courtesy
    are expected, even when disagreeing.

    The Committee believes that providing more opportunities for two-way
    discussion between the organization's leaders and the entire ham radio
    community will assist ARRL in truly serving the needs of this
    community. -- Thanks to ARRL Communications Manager Dave Isgur, N1RSN

    Yukon's VY1JA Plans to Be Back for 2020 ARRL November Sweepstakes CW

    ARRL November Sweepstakes stalwart J. Allen, VY1JA, in Canada's Yukon
    Territory, may not be off the air quite yet. Allen announced his
    retirement from ham radio last November, but now says he plans to keep
    a small station on the air "for as long as possible," leaving one
    antenna tower in place. Allen told ARRL earlier this month that there's
    a "strong likelihood" he'll return for the 2020 ARRL November
    Sweepstakes CW in the Low Power category, using his own call sign.

    For the past few years, the remotely operated VY1AAA, using equipment
    and antennas located at VY1JA, has been among the precious few stations
    handing out the Northern Territories multiplier in Sweepstakes. Gerry
    Hull, W1VE/VE1RM, told ARRL that the remote equipment and high-power
    amplifier have now been removed, along with the radio gear and antennas
    from Allen's larger station, which will be sold. Allen, who has been
    diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, says his current medication has
    stabilized his condition, but he's been looking ahead to the day when
    his wife, Ann, would face the task of dismantling and disposing of his
    station equipment and antennas.

    "Because I am concerned about what I will be like in a few years or so,
    I wanted to sell out the station completely so that Ann would not have
    a big problem on her hands removing poles, towers, cables, gear, and so
    on," he explained.

    Allen thanked Hull; Cary Rubenfeld, VE4EA; Chuck Cullian, K0RF, and
    Tyson Schulz, VY1SLZ, for their assistance. Rubenfeld is handling the
    sale of Allen's gear, while Schulz has pledged to assist in dismantling
    and disposing of Allen's scaled-down station when the time comes.
    Cullian has provided a transceiver for Allen, who no longer had an
    operational radio on site.

    "It means that, for as long as I remain functional, I intend to keep
    VY1JA on the air, and especially to be there for as many ARRL
    Sweepstakes as possible," Allen said.

    Hull said he and others involved with the VY1AAA remote operations have
    been looking for a new home for the VY1AAA remote gear and radio.
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: This week, we finally saw the return
    of sunspots over 6 of the last 7 days, January 24 - 29. The average
    daily sunspot number rose from 0 to 11.1, while average daily solar
    flux jumped from 71.2 to 72.9.

    Geomagnetic indicators remained very quiet, signaling continued great
    conditions on 160 and 80 meters. Predicted solar flux over the next
    month and a half is 74 on January 30 - February 2; 70 on February 3 -
    6; 71 on February 7 - 13; 72 on February 14 - 20; 73 on February 21 -
    22; 74 on February 23 - 29; 72 on March 1 - 3; 71 on March 4 - 11, and
    72 on March 12 - 14.

    Predicted planetary A index is 8 on January 30; 5 on January 31 -
    February 24; 10 on February 25 - 26; 5 on February 27 - 29; 8 on March
    1 - 3, and 5 on March 4 - 14.

    On January 27, the total sunspot area was 100 millionth of the visible
    solar disc. The total sunspot area hasn't been larger or even near that
    size since May 18, 2019, when the area was 140 millionth of the visible
    solar disk.

    Sunspot numbers for January 23 - 29 were 0, 12, 14, 18, 12, 11, and 11,
    with a mean of 11.1. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 70.8, 71, 72.7, 74.7,
    72.9, 74.2, and 74.3, with a mean of 72.9. Estimated planetary A
    indices were 5, 3, 3, 4, 3, 5, and 9, with a mean of 4.6. Middle
    latitude A index was 3, 1, 3, 2, 2, 4, and 6, with a mean of 3.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * February 1 -- Minnesota QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * February 1 -- FYBO Winter QRP Sprint (CW, phone, digital)
    * February 1 -- AGCW Straight Key Party (CW)
    * February 1 -- FISTS Winter Slow Speed Sprint (CW)
    * February 1 -- Black Sea Cup International (CW, phone)
    * February 1 - 2 -- Vermont QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * February 1 - 2 -- 10-10 International Winter Contest, SSB
    * February 1 - 2 -- F9AA Cup, CW
    * February 1 - 2 -- Mexico RTTY International Contest
    * February 1 - 2 -- British Columbia QSO Party (CW, phone, digital)
    * February 2 -- North American Sprint, CW
    * February 3 -- 3.5 RSGB 80-Meter Club Championship, SSB
    * February 4 -- ARS Spartan Sprint (CW)
    * February 5 -- UKEICC 80-Meter Contest (Phone)
    * February 6 -- NRAU 10-Meter Activity Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * February 6 -- SKCC Sprint Europe (CW)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on amateur radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    New Amateur Extra-Class Question Pool Released

    The new Amateur Extra-class license examination question pool,
    effective from July 1, 2020, through June 30, 2024, has been released
    and is available at the National Conference of Volunteer Coordinators
    (NCVEC) website.

    The 2020 - 2024 Extra-class pool incorporates significant changes
    compared to the current 2016 - 2020 question pool, which expires on
    June 30. The number of questions in the pool was reduced from 712 to
    622. The result was 239 modified questions, 49 new questions, and 139
    questions removed due to changes in what was felt to be an abundance of
    outdated questions, while areas of new technology and subjects were
    added.

    In addition, an effort was made to balance the difficulty level,
    removing or replacing some questions deemed too easy or too difficult
    compared to the rest of the pool.

    The 2020 pool has 10 diagrams, which have been renumbered because the
    new question pool has two fewer than the 2016 question pool.

    HuskySat-1 With VHF/UHF Linear Transponder Set to Deploy Soon

    The University of Washington's HuskySat-1 3U CubeSat, launched November
    2, 2019, is set to deploy on January 31 after the vehicle that carried
    it to the International Space Station undocks. HuskySat-1 has remained
    stowed aboard a Northrop Grumman Cygnus supply vehicle. Within 24 hours
    after Cygnus' departure from the ISS, HuskySat-1 and SwampSat 2 will be
    deployed into orbit.

    University of Washington graduate
    student Paige Northway with
    HuskySat-1. She has been involved in
    the project since its inception.

    After deployment, HuskySat-1's 1,200 bps BPSK beacon on 435.800 MHz
    should be active and decodable with the latest release of AMSAT's
    FoxTelem software. HuskySat-1 is expected to carry out its primary
    mission before being turned over to AMSAT for amateur radio operation.

    HuskySat-1 features a 30 kHz wide V/U linear transponder for SSB and
    CW. The uplink passband will be 145.910 - 145.940 MHz LSB/CW. The
    downlink passband will be 435.840 - 435.810 MHz USB/CW (inverting).
    Telemetry will be transmitted on 435.800 MHz, 1k2 bps BPSK with an
    experimental downlink at 24.049 GHz. The "Fox-in-a-Box" FoxTelem
    software has been updated for HuskySat-1 operation at its download
    website. The new release now contains the SD card image,
    FIAB-distro8-V1.08w.zip. This file, when unzipped and written to a 16
    GB SD card, will provide the latest software for FoxTelem and will run
    on a Raspberry Pi 4. The 1.08 versions can switch bands between
    listening on VHF and UHF, based on which Fox and Husky satellites are
    overhead at the time.

    The linear transponder and telemetry system carried aboard AMSAT's
    Fox-1E was designed for use in different CubeSats merely by adding an
    interface adapter for connection to the host bus. Noting the prevalence
    of CubeSats built and launched by universities and other organizations,
    AMSAT adopted a goal of "amateur radio in every CubeSat."

    ditional information is posted on the University of Washington Husky
    Satellite Lab site. -- Thanks to AMSAT News Service via the HuskySat-1
    Team, AMSAT Engineering, AMSAT Operations, the Fox Telemetry Team, and
    NASA
    State QSO Party Challenge Announced

    The State QSO Party Challenge is a competition comprised of other
    contests, namely state and provincial QSO parties. As explained on the
    website, the annual cumulative score program is open to any radio
    amateur who participates in any approved state QSO parties (SQPs).
    Participants just need to submit their QSO party scores to
    3830scores.com to enter the challenge.

    Participants' cumulative scores will be calculated by totaling up the
    number of reported contacts and multiplying by the number of SQPs
    entered in the year to date. Periodic standings will be posted to
    3830scores.com, the QSOParty Groups.io forum, and the StateQSOParty.com
    website.

    "Using the number of QSO parties entered as a multiplier is expected to
    encourage radio amateurs to enter more state/province QSO parties," the
    program's organizers said. "The first SQPs in 2020 are the Vermont,
    Minnesota, and British Columbia QSO Parties in the first weekend of
    February."

    Entrants must make at least two contacts in a QSO party for it to count
    as a multiplier. The full details are available on the State QSO Party
    Challenge website.

    Challenge sponsors expressed appreciation to Bruce Horn, WA7BNM, for
    developing the SQP Activity Tracker on 3830scores.com.

    Iowa State Parks on the Air 2020 Celebrates Centennial of Iowa State
    Parks

    Iowa State Parks on the Air (IASPOTA-2020) is under way and will
    continue through year's end. The event is sponsored by the Great River
    Amateur Radio Club, with the support of Iowa ARRL Section Manager Lelia
    Garner, WA0UIG, and the Iowa Division of Natural Resources (DNR).

    According to Colin Wheatley, W9UPK, Iowa had the first state park
    system in the nation, and Iowa's first state park, Backbone State Park,
    was dedicated in 1920. Since then, the state park system has grown to
    some 70 parks and recreational facilities, including 63 state parks.

    Stations logging contacts with five of Iowa's state parks during the
    year-long celebration can request a certificate by sending a legal-size
    self-addressed, sealed envelope to IASPOTA-2020 c/o Great River Amateur
    Radio Club, P.O. Box 1384, Dubuque, IA 52004.
    YOTA Camp 2020 in the Americas Donations Are Being Matched

    Youth on the Air (YOTA) 2020 Camp Director Neil Rapp, WB9VPG, has
    announced that, thanks to a generous radio amateur, a matching fund
    drive is in progress through the end of February to help fund the 2020
    YOTA Camp, June 21 - 26 at the National Voice of America Museum of
    Broadcasting in West Chester, Ohio.

    "From now until the end of February, every dollar donated to the Youth
    on the Air Camp will be matched by Steve McGrane, KM9G, up to a total
    of $4,000," Rapp said. "Your donations in support of this unique
    opportunity for youth to share ham radio with their peers will count
    double until the end of February."

    Donations may be made via PayPal, GoFundMe, or a check. Rapp said
    donations could make it possible to increase the number of campers from
    20 to 30 to better meet demand.

    "Our corporate and foundation sponsors have raised most of the funds,
    but we need clubs and individuals to finish the job," he explained.

    Rapp is an alumnus of the ARRL Teachers Institute on Wireless
    Technology TI-1 and TI-2 courses.
    Past ARRL Southeastern Division Director H. Dale Strieter, W4QM, SK

    Past ARRL Southeastern Division Director Dale Strieter, W4QM
    (ex-W4DQS), of Cocoa Beach, died on January 6. An ARRL Life Member, he
    was 92 and a founding member of the Maxim Society. Strieter was ARRL
    Southeastern Division Director from 1970 until 1973.

    During World War II, he served as a US Maritime Service radio officer
    in the Pacific. After the war, he received a BS in electrical
    engineering from Michigan State. He got his amateur radio license in
    1947. Strieter later earned an MSEE from Michigan State, and then
    worked as an audio engineer.

    In 1958, Strieter moved to Cocoa Beach to work for General Electric,
    was a NASA contractor, and he served as the guidance engineer on the
    Mercury and Gemini manned spaceflight missions.

    Strieter was a prolific DXpeditioner. After 20 years with GE, he
    returned to sea in 1979 as a radio officer in the US Merchant Marine on
    a ship generally anchored at the Chagos Islands. As VQ9QM, Strieter
    logged more than 200,000 contacts from nearby Diego Garcia Island,
    between 1986 and 2001. He retired in 2002. -- Thanks to Tom Tenney,
    W8OJM, and Don Karvonen, K8MFO
    In Brief...

    The W8S DXpedition team heading to Swains Island in the Pacific in
    March reports, "All lights are green." Team members will leave from
    home in early March, and all will convene in Pago Pago, American Samoa,
    to board the vessel Manu Atele, which will transport everyone to the
    atoll. The voyage will take 24 hours. Smaller vessels will carry the
    operators and equipment to the island at high tide, which the update
    called "a serious challenge." The ship will not remain offshore while
    the DXpedition is under way, "hopefully picking the team up again after
    14 days." An international team of 10 operators will be active from
    March 10 to March 25 on all HF bands on CW, SSB, FT8, and RTTY.
    Operation will be 24/7 from two separate camps on the island, each with
    two stations. Visit the Swains Island 2020 DXpedition website for more
    information.

    Dayton Hamvention 2020 Web Portal Opens for Tickets, Exhibit Space
    Online orders for Dayton Hamvention^(R) 2020 tickets, inside exhibit
    spaces, and flea market spots can now be placed online. Those who
    ordered online in 2019 should have their user IDs and passwords
    available when placing orders. Hamvention's all-volunteer staff will
    work as quickly as possible to respond to orders. If you encounter
    difficulties, email the appropriate committee: Tickets, Inside
    Exhibits, or Flea Market. Hamvention announced in December that it
    would be increasing the cost of admission and its booth fees. General
    admission is now $26 in advance or $31 at the gate for all 3 days. The
    cost of flea market spots has risen by $5 per space, and inside
    exhibitors will pay $30. Hamvention 2020 takes place May 15 - 17 at the
    Greene County Fairgrounds and Exhibition Center, 210 Fairground Road,
    Xenia, Ohio.

    The Northeast HamXposition -- formerly known as "Boxboro" -- is moving
    and will take place this year July 24 - 26 in Marlborough,
    Massachusetts. The new venue, the Best Western Royal Plaza Hotel and
    Trade Center, is about 15 miles from Boxboro off Interstate 495 (Exit
    24A). The Northeast HamXposition, which had been held in early
    September in past years, hosts the ARRL New England Division
    Convention. "The new venue offers us much-needed additional capacity
    for forums, a larger flea market, and ample parking right in the
    hotel's main lot," said Event Chairman Bob DeMattia, K1IW. We will
    announce very soon when the hotel is accepting reservations." DeMattia
    pointed out that the Marlborough location has a lot to offer, including
    dozens of restaurants in the vicinity and the new Apex Entertainment
    Center on Route 20, adjacent to the hotel.

    The location of the W9DXCC ARRL Specialty Operating Convention has
    changed. The event will take place September 11 - 12 at the Chicago
    Marriott Hotel in Naperville, Illinois. Registration and hotel
    reservations will open in the spring. W9DXCC is sponsored by the
    Northern Illinois DX Association. This year's event will include a
    Contest University and DX University. Saturday's events will include
    forums, QSL card checking, a CW pileup contest, an evening reception,
    and a banquet. For more information, visit the W9DXCC website. --
    Thanks to Kermit Carlson, W9XA; The Daily DX

    The Alexanderson alternator 2019 Christmas Eve transmission on 17.2 kHz
    from SAQ in Grimeton, Sweden, was heard by more than 400 listeners. SAQ
    reported conditions were very good, with clear, dry weather, and the
    vintage transmitter functioned flawlessly. Lars K†lland, SM6NM, was at
    the key to deliver his last Christmas message before he retired. SAQ
    said it was "stunned" by the number of reports it received -- a total
    of 426 from 32 countries, including the US and Canada.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * February 1 -- South Carolina State Convention, North Charleston,
    South Carolina
    * February 1 -- Virginia State Convention, Richmond, Virginia
    * February 7 - 9 -- Northern Florida Section Convention, Orlando,
    Florida
    * February 14 - 15 -- Southwest Division Convention, Yuma, Arizona
    * March 7 - Delta Division Convention, Russellville, Arkansas
    * March 13 - 14 -- North Carolina Section Convention, Concord, North
    Carolina
    * March 14 - 15 -- Great Lakes Division Convention, Perrysburg, Ohio
    * March 14 -- Nebraska State Convention, Lincoln, Nebraska
    * March 14 -- West Virginia Section Convention, Charleston, West
    Virginia
    * March 21 -- West Texas Section Convention, Midland, Texas
    * April 10 - 11 -- Oklahoma State Convention, Claremore, Oklahoma
    * April 11 -- Roanoke Division Convention, Raleigh, North Carolina
    * April 18 - Delaware State Convention, Georgetown, Delaware

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
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    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Feb 7 09:05:16 2020
    The ARRL Letter
    February 6, 2020

    * ARRL HF Band Planning Committee Seeks Comments on Recommendations
    * "The Auroral Connection" to Be Focus of 2020 HamSCI Workshop
    * Undersea Expedition Planned to Retrieve Titanic's Radio Gear
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * Clayton Coleman, W5PFG, Elected AMSAT President
    * ARISS Announces Hosts for Space Station Ham Radio Contacts
    * 7X7X DXpedition Showcases Cooperation and Youth
    * President Signs PIRATE Act to Combat Illegal Broadcasting
    * In Brief...
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    ARRL HF Band Planning Committee Seeks Comments on Recommendations

    The ARRL HF Band Planning Committee is seeking comments and suggestions
    from the amateur radio community on its report to the ARRL Board of
    Directors. At the Board's January meeting, the committee presented its
    specific recommendations in graphical form for each HF band and each US
    license class, with the goal of increasing harmony on the HF bands,
    particularly between CW and digital users.

    "In general, the committee is of the opinion that there is
    justification for additional space to become available for digital
    modes, as well as for the operation of digital stations under automatic
    control," the committee told the Board. "The very changes in spectrum
    usage that have required our committee's resurgence indicate that
    digital modes of communication are already increasing in popularity,
    and the trend is expected to continue or even accelerate. To this end,
    we have tried to ensure that digital allocations are sufficient for at
    least a modicum of growth."

    The committee also anticipates an increase in automatically controlled
    digital stations (ACDS). The report further points to "significant use"
    of modern data modes in emergency communication and said its
    recommendations provide significant support for the evolution and
    continued relevance of amateur radio. "Our failure to adapt to these
    needs could consign amateur radio to the technological scrap heap," the
    report said.

    The committee was revived last summer to consider conflicts between FT
    and JT modes and other modes. The panel's approach has been to
    designate distinct assignments for CW, narrowband (NB) data <500 Hz,
    wideband (WB) data <2800 Hz, and ACDS. For its work, the committee
    presumed approval of three ARRL petitions to the FCC: RM-11708 (WT
    Docket WT 16-239 -- "symbol rate" proceeding), RM-11759 (80/75 meter
    allocations), and RM-11828 (enhanced Technician privileges). The
    committee also assumed that users can agree to sharing arrangements
    within a given allocation -- narrowband versus wideband sharing within
    the ACDS allocation, for example. It also took into consideration how
    mode usage is regulated or planned elsewhere in the world.

    In terms of mode classes, the committee agreed on CW, NB data, WB data,
    NB with ACDS, and WB with ACDS. The committee said it considered these
    mode classes incompatible and that they should not have overlapping
    allocations, with the exception of CW, which is authorized within any
    amateur radio allocation. The committee's approach would maintain the
    existing low-end 25 kHz CW-only sub-bands for exclusive use by Amateur
    Extra-class licensees.

    The panel encouraged CW identification and a listen-before-transmitting
    protocol for ACDS, if feasible. It also decided that a single
    allocation for ACDS without regard to bandwidth would be the best
    approach. "We note that this will put responsibility on the digital
    community to hold an effective dialog on the issue and to then
    self-regulate the users of this segment to adhere to the eventual
    agreement." A need for flexibility in allocations is desirable, the
    committee said, and considered whether allocations might be time-of-day
    or time-of-week dependent, for example.

    "Modern amateurs must expect to adapt to this kind of fluid assignment
    of spectrum to incompatible uses, using time-based sharing, rather than
    only a single assignment," the committee said, expressing the hope that
    as band plan/sharing agreements are reached that they consider the
    advantage of "non-simultaneous sharing possibilities."

    Reiterating the position ARRL has taken in recent FCC filings, the
    committee said it sees encryption and open-source enforcement matters
    as being outside the scope of the Band Planning Committee.

    The Committee would like comments by February 19.
    "The Auroral Connection" to Be Focus of 2020 HamSCI Workshop

    Registration is open for the third annual HamSCI Workshop for amateur
    radio operators and professional scientists, Friday and Saturday, March
    20 - 21, at The University of Scranton. The theme of this year's
    workshop is "The Auroral Connection," and will include addresses by
    guest speakers, poster presentations, and demonstrations of relevant
    instrumentation and software. All radio amateurs, scientists, and
    anyone interested in ionospheric and space physics are welcome.

    The workshop will serve as a team meeting for the HamSCI Personal Space
    Weather Station project, a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded
    project awarded to University of Scranton physics and electrical
    engineering professor Nathaniel Frissell, W2NAF. The project seeks to
    harness the power of a network of radio amateurs to better understand
    and measure the effects of weather in the upper levels of Earth's
    atmosphere. Through the grant, Frissell, a space physicist, will lead a
    collaborative team that will develop modular, multi-instrument,
    ground-based space science observation equipment and data collection
    and analysis software. He will also recruit multiple universities and
    ham radio users to operate the network of Personal Space Weather
    Stations developed.

    In addition to Scranton, the Personal Space Weather Station project
    includes participation from TAPR; the Case Western Reserve University
    Amateur Radio Club, W8EDU; the University of Alabama; the New Jersey
    Institute of Technology Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research; MIT
    Haystack Observatory; Dartmouth College, and the ham radio community at
    large.

    Noted contester and DXer Tim Duffy, K3LR, will deliver the keynote
    address. The chief operating officer and general manager at DX
    Engineering, Duffy chairs Contest University, the Dayton Contest
    Dinner, and the Top Band Dinner, as well as coordinates the Contest
    Super Suite. He is the founder and moderator of the popular RFI
    Reflector. Duffy serves on the ARRL Foundation Board of Directors as
    well as on the board of the World Wide Radio Operators Foundation
    (WWROF), and as chairman and president emeritus of the Radio Club of
    America.

    Other speakers at the workshop include Elizabeth MacDonald, the NASA
    researcher who founded and leads the Aurorasaurus project. She will
    discuss fundamentals of auroral physics, its optical signatures, and
    the Aurorasaurus citizen science project. James LaBelle, a professor of
    physics and astronomy at Dartmouth University and auroral radio
    physicist, and David Hallidy, K2DH, a retired microwave engineer who is
    also well-known for his work in auroral-mode propagation will also
    speak.

    ditional information on the conference is available on the HamSCI
    Workshop 2020 website.

    Undersea Expedition Planned to Retrieve Titanic's Radio Gear

    The company with sole rights to salvage artifacts from the RMS Titanic
    has gone to court to gain permission to carry out a "surgical removal
    and retrieval" of the Marconi radio equipment on the ship, a Washington
    Post article reports. The Titanic sank in 1912 on its maiden voyage
    after striking an iceberg in the North Atlantic. As the radio room
    filled with water, radio operator Jack Phillips transmitted, "Come at
    once. We have struck a berg. It's a CQD, old man," and other frantic
    messages for help, using the spark transmitter on board. CQD was
    ultimately replaced with SOS -- which Phillips also used -- as the
    universal distress call. The passenger liner RMS Carpathia responded
    and rescued 705 of the passengers.

    A recreation of the Titanic radio
    room.

    As might be expected, the deteriorating Marconi equipment is in poor
    shape after more than a century under water. The undersea retrieval
    would mark the first time an artifact was collected from within the
    Titanic, which many believe should remain undisturbed as the final
    resting place of some 1,500 victims of the maritime disaster, including
    Phillips. The wreck sits on the ocean floor some 2 1/2 miles beneath
    the surface, remaining undiscovered until 1985.

    A just-signed treaty between the UK and the US grants both countries
    authority to allow or deny access to the wreck and to remove items
    found outside the vessel. "This momentous agreement with the United
    States to preserve the wreck means it will be treated with the
    sensitivity and respect owed to the final resting place of more than
    1,500 lives," British Transport and Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani said
    in a statement.

    The request to enter the rapidly disintegrating wreck was filed in US
    District Court in Eastern Virginia by RMS Titanic, Inc. of Atlanta,
    Georgia, which said that it hopes to restore the Titanic radio
    transmitter to operating condition, if it is allowed to go forward.

    The company plans to use a manned submarine to reach the wreck and then
    deploy a remotely controlled sub that would perforate the hull and
    retrieve the radio equipment.
    The K7RA Solar Update

    Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: We saw a nice run of Cycle 24 and
    Cycle 25 sunspots from January 24 through February 1. The daily sunspot
    number reached a short-term peak of 18 on January 26.

    Average daily sunspot numbers declined from the 11.1 reported last week
    to 4.7 during the current reporting week, January 30 - February 5.

    Predicted solar flux for the next 45 days is 70 on February 6 - 13; 72
    on February 14 - 20; 73 on February 21 - 22; 74 on February 23 - 29; 72
    on March 1 - 3; 71 on March 4 - 11; 72 on March 12 - 18; 73 on March 19
    - 20, and 74 on March 21.

    Predicted planetary A index is 12 and 8 on February 6 - 7; 5 on
    February 8 - 24; 10 on February 25 - 26; 5 on February 27 - 29; 8 on
    March 1 - 3, and 5 on March 4 - 21.

    Sunspot numbers for January 30 through February 5 were 11, 11, 11, 0,
    0, 0, and 0, with a mean of 4.7. The 10.7-centimeter flux was 74.1,
    73.9, 72.5, 72.2, 72.1, 70.3, and 70.6, with a mean of 72.2. Estimated
    planetary A indices were 12, 8, 6, 6, 5, 5, and 5, with a mean of 6.7.
    Middle latitude A index was 9, 6, 4, 4, 3, 5, and 4, with a mean of 5.

    A comprehensive K7RA Solar Update is posted Fridays on the ARRL
    website. For more information concerning radio propagation, visit the
    ARRL Technical Information Service, read "What the Numbers Mean...,"
    and check out K9LA's Propagation Page.

    A propagation bulletin archive is available. Monthly charts offer
    propagation projections between the US and a dozen DX locations.

    Share your reports and observations.

    Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * February 8 -- FISTS Winter Unlimited Sprint (CW)
    * February 8 -- RSGB 1.8 MHz Contest (CW)
    * February 8 -- Asia-Pacific Spring Sprint (CW)
    * February 8 - 9 -- CQ World Wide RTTY WPX Contest
    * February 8 - 9 -- SARL Field Day Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * February 8 - 9 -- KCJ Topband Contest (CW)
    * February 8 - 9 -- Dutch PACC Contest (CW, phone)
    * February 8 - 9 -- SKCC Weekend Sprintathon (CW)
    * February 8 - 10 -- YLRL YL-OM Contest (CW, phone, digital)
    * February 8 - 9 -- OMISS QSO Party (Phone)
    * February 9 -- Balkan HF Contest (CW, phone)
    * February 9 - 12 -- Classic Exchange, Phone
    * February 10 -- CQC Winter QSO Party (CW)
    * February 10 -- 4 States QRP Group Second Sunday Sprint (CW, phone)
    * February 10 - 14 -- ARRL School Club Roundup (CW, phone)
    * February 12 -- NAQCC CW Sprint
    * February 12 -- RSGB 80-Meter Club Championship (Digital)

    See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information. For in-depth
    reporting on amateur radio contesting, subscribe to The ARRL Contest
    Update via your ARRL member profile email preferences.
    Clayton Coleman, W5PFG, Elected AMSAT President

    During a teleconference meeting this week, the AMSAT Board of Directors
    elected Clayton Coleman, W5PFG, of Granbury, Texas, as AMSAT President.
    Coleman had served as a member of the Board of Directors and as AMSAT
    Secretary from 2017 until 2019, and he has volunteered in several other
    capacities for AMSAT, including as chair of the 2016 AMSAT Space
    Symposium. He succeeds Joe Spier, K6WAO, who resigned recently, citing
    personal reasons, after being in office since October 2017.

    Coleman was introduced to amateur radio in space through the SAREX
    program -- the forerunner to ARISS -- and the Russian Mir space
    station. His interest in setting up an AX.25 BBS and nodes in the early
    1990s led him to try making contacts via the Mir Personal Message
    System (PMS) and digipeater. In 2011, Coleman became interested in
    OSCAR satellites and began chasing operating awards.

    Coleman's focus as president will be working with members to improve
    organizational processes and aligning them with strategic goals.
    Professionally, Coleman works in the industrial process control sector
    both as a consultant and business development manager.

    AMSAT members will have an opportunity to meet Coleman at Orlando
    HamCation on Saturday, February 8, when he will greet visitors at the
    AMSAT booth from 9:30 - 10:30 AM and 2 - 3 PM. He will also speak at
    the AMSAT Forum at 12:30 PM on Saturday in Room CS III at the Lakeside
    Pavilion. -- Thanks to AMSAT News Service

    ARISS Announces Hosts for Space Station Ham Radio Contacts

    Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has announced
    the names of schools and organizations selected to host amateur radio
    contacts with International Space Station crew members during the
    second half of 2020.

    Ten proposals were accepted to move forward in the selection process
    and placed in a scheduling queue for an amateur radio contact between
    July and December 2020. Although ARISS expects to schedule all 10
    during this period, changes to NASA crew availability may force
    postponement of some contact opportunities until the first half of
    2021.

    The schools and host organizations are:
    * Estes Park Elementary School, Estes Park, Colorado
    * Green Bank Elementary-Middle School, Green Bank, West Virginia
    * Tecumseh Public School, Tecumseh, Oklahoma
    * Regional School Unit 21, Kennebunk, Maine
    * John F. Kennedy High School, Denver, Colorado
    * Oregon Charter School, Mill City, Oregon
    * Newcastle High School; Newcastle, Wyoming
    * Tarwater Elementary School, Chandler, Arizona
    * Kopernik Observatory and Science Center, Vestal, New York
    * Salem-South Lyon District Library, South Lyon, Michigan

    7X7X DXpedition Showcases Cooperation and Youth

    A cooperative agreement the Algerian and Tunisian IARU member-societies
    signed in 2014 to reinforce relations through joint activities bore
    fruit with the 7X7X DXpedition to Algeria late last year. Preparations
    began in late October 2019, with the goal of activating Algeria on the
    low bands to benefit from the slump in the solar cycle.

    Co-leader Ash Chaabane, 3V8SF/KF5EYY, said organizers wanted to take
    advantage of the DXpedition to boost interest among younger hams. Four
    young people were involved in the event as a result: Sarra, 7X2QV;
    Lotfi Kara, 7X2QC; Marwa, 3V8CB, and Ahmed Boubaker, 3V1B/KG5OUE, who
    are all in their 20s. Three of them have participated in Youngsters On
    The Air (YOTA) events sponsored by the International Amateur Radio
    Union (IARU). Chaabane said the youthful contingent was involved from
    setup to tear down, in addition to operating.

    In addition to Chaabane, the team included co-leader Afif Ben Lagha,
    7X2RO; Brahim Mohamed, 7X3TL; Redha el Bahi, 7X5QB, and Abdelghani
    Mesbah, 7X2TT/M0NPT. The Tunisian team flew from Tunis to Algiers,
    arriving on December 28 in Bejaia to join the Algerian team. "We
    immediately started putting up antennas," Chaabane said.

    7X2TT kicked off the operation through the Es'hail satellite,
    demonstrating for the benefit of the younger operators how ham radio
    satellites work. The rest of the team built a nearly 40-foot tall
    inverted L for 160 meters; a full quarter-wave vertical for 80 meters;
    a two-element Fritzel Yagi for the high bands; a seven-element Yagi for
    VHF; a K9AY receiving loop, and a ground plane for 30 meters, which
    operated on 40 meters as well with the addition of a loading coil.

    "We did our best to operate two stations at a time," Chaabane
    recounted. "We had quite few technical issues, but we overcame them."
    7X7X ended up logging 5,800 contacts in 4 days, and the operating
    schedule was intentionally flexible.

    The mode breakdown showed 38% CW, 55% SSB, and 7% FT8. "We had 1,121
    QSOs on 160 and 798 on 80," Chaabane said, with 356 US and 30 JA
    contacts on 160 meters.

    One objective of the DXpedition was to bond and form a strong team
    capable of larger operations in the future, Chaabane said.

    The DXpedition team expressed its appreciation for the support from the
    Northern California DX Foundation (NCDXF), the Lone Star DX Association
    (LSDXA), and the Mediterraneo DX Club (MDXC), as well as some
    individual hams. "This support is a solid investment into the future of
    the ham radio hobby," Chaabane said. "We urge all DXpeditioners to
    involve youngsters in their future trips and do their best to make it
    easy and least costly for them." -- Thanks to IARU

    President Signs PIRATE Act to Combat Illegal Broadcasting

    On January 24, President Donald Trump signed into law the "Preventing
    Illegal Radio Abuse Through Enforcement Act," or the PIRATE Act. The
    measure, which amends the Communications Act of 1934, authorizes
    enhanced penalties for violators. Under the new law, pirate radio
    broadcasters would be subject to a fine of not more than $2 million,
    and violators could be fined up to $100,000 for each day during which
    an offense occurs. The new law stipulates that the FCC "shall not
    decrease or diminish the regular enforcement efforts targeted to pirate
    radio broadcast stations for other times of the year."

    The FCC is to submit to the House Committee on Energy and Commerce and
    the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation a report
    summarizing the implementation of this section and associated
    enforcement activities for the previous fiscal year. The new law also
    requires "annual sweeps," during which FCC personnel will be assigned
    to "focus specific and sustained attention on the elimination of pirate
    radio broadcasting within the top five radio markets identified as
    prevalent for such broadcasts." The Commission also "shall conduct
    monitoring sweeps to ascertain whether the pirate radio broadcasting
    identified by enforcement sweeps is continuing and whether additional
    pirate radio broadcasting is occurring."

    Under the new law, the FCC will change its rules so that it proceeds
    directly to issuance of a Notice of Apparent Liability (NAL) without
    first issuing a Notice of Unlicensed Operation (NOUO).

    The FCC will develop and publish a database of all licensed AM and FM
    broadcasters, accessible directly from the FCC home page. The FCC is
    also required to publish a list of "all entities that have received a
    Notice of Unlicensed Operation, Notice of Apparent Liability, or
    forfeiture order," as well as "each entity...operating without a
    Commission license or authorization."

    The law defines pirate radio broadcasting as transmitting within the AM
    and FM bands without an FCC license, but excluding unlicensed
    operations in compliance with Part 15.
    In Brief...

    Brief Interruptions of ARRL Headquarters Systems are planned for
    Thursday, February 13. The ARRL IT Department anticipates two short
    interruptions to these Headquarters-based systems: Logbook of The
    World; Online DXCC; International Grid Chase Archive; National Parks on
    the Air Archive; Centennial QSO Party Archive, and the W1AW EchoLink
    Conference Server. The interruptions should occur on Thursday, February
    13, between 1200 - 2200 UTC. Each interruption should be less than 10
    minutes in length.

    Former ARRL East Bay Section Manager Ti-Michelle Connelly, NJ6T, of
    Yuma, Arizona, died late last week. She served as SM from 2003 until
    2007. An ARRL Life Member, she was 72. The California native also held
    other Field Organization appointments, including Net Manager,
    Affiliated Club Coordinator, Assistant Section Manager, and Official
    Emergency Station. Connelly was also an ARRL VEC and W5YI VEC Volunteer
    Examiner. "Her spirit and fun will be sorely missed by many of us this
    year," said a friend, Kristen McIntyre, K6WX.

    The International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) has completed the makeover
    of its main website and the three regional websites -- all with the
    same basic design. The three regional sites can be accessed directly
    from the IARU home page. All of the updated pages are organized to
    broadly mirror the structure of the International Telecommunication
    Union (ITU) and its related regional telecommunication organizations.
    The Region 2 web page is available in English or Spanish. Each page
    offers a look at recent IARU news and events. -- Thanks to IARU
    Secretary David Sumner, K1ZZ

    Amateur radio volunteers in Turkey supported the response to a powerful
    magnitude 6.8 earthquake that struck the province of Elazig on January
    24. Radio amateurs affiliated with the national International Amateur
    Radio Union member-society TRAC assisted in the response. Aziz Sasa,
    TA1E, at TRAC Headquarters reported, "The affected area was very small
    and the intensity limited; our involvement was also limited." He said
    two TRAC branches in the affected area stepped in, assisting by
    providing tactical communication in the affected area and supporting
    the Ministry of Health by installing and getting their mountaintop
    repeater operational. "Due to the relatively limited scale of the
    disaster, foreign assistance was not needed," he told IARU Region 1
    Emergency Communications Coordinator Greg Mossop, G0DUB. The earthquake
    caused about 40 deaths and more than 1,600 injuries as well as
    considerable property damage.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions
    * February 7 - 9 -- Northern Florida Section Convention, Orlando,
    Florida
    * February 14 - 15 -- Southwest Division Convention, Yuma, Arizona
    * March 7 - Delta Division Convention, Russellville, Arkansas
    * March 13 - 14 -- North Carolina Section Convention, Concord, North
    Carolina
    * March 14 - 15 -- Great Lakes Division Convention, Perrysburg, Ohio
    * March 14 -- Nebraska State Convention, Lincoln, Nebraska
    * March 14 -- West Virginia Section Convention, Charleston, West
    Virginia
    * March 21 -- West Texas Section Convention, Midland, Texas
    * April 10 - 11 -- Oklahoma State Convention, Claremore, Oklahoma
    * April 11 -- Roanoke Division Convention, Raleigh, North Carolina
    * April 18 -- Delaware State Convention, Georgetown, Delaware

    Find conventions and hamfests in your area.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL -- Your One-Stop Resource for
    Amateur Radio News and Information.

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    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

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    Copyright (c) 2020 American Radio Relay League, Incorporated. Use and
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    --- SendMsg/2

    --- Squish/386 v1.11
    * Origin: Outpost BBS * Limestone, TN, USA (1:18/200)
  • From Sean Dennis@1:18/200 to All on Fri Feb 14 09:05:18 2020
    The ARRL Letter
    February 13, 2020

    * ARRL Board of Directors Re-Elects President Rick Roderick, K5UR
    * ARRL Board Grants Awards and Recognitions
    * ARRL Creates New HF Band Planning Discussion Group
    * ARRL Podcasts Schedule
    * New ARRL Repeater Directory Now Shipping
    * The ARRL International DX Contest (CW) Is Just Ahead
    * The K7RA Solar Update
    * Just Ahead in Radiosport
    * QRZ.com Ends Identity Verified Program
    * Foundation for Amateur Radio Invites 2020 - 2021 Scholarship
    Applications
    * In Brief
    * Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL Headquarters Will Be Closed for Presidents Day, Monday, February
    17. There will be no W1AW bulletin or code practice transmissions on
    that day. Headquarters will reopen on Tuesday, February 18, at 8 AM
    EST.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    ARRL Board of Directors Re-Elects President Rick Roderick, K5UR

    Meeting January 17 - 18 in Windsor, Connecticut, the ARRL Board of
    Directors re-elected ARRL President Rick Roderick, K5UR, to a third
    2-year term. Roderick outpolled the only other nominee, Pacific

    ARRL President Rick
    Roderick, K5UR.

    Division Director Jim Tiemstra, K6JAT, 8 - 7. New England Division Vice
    Director Mike Raisbeck, K1TWF, was elected First Vice President,
    succeeding Greg Widin, K0GW, who did not seek another term. Raisbeck
    was the sole nominee. A successor will be appointed to fill the Vice
    Director seat that Raisbeck has vacated. Bob Vallio, W6RGG, was
    re-elected as Second Vice President as the only nominee.

    On a 9 - 6 vote, the Board voted not to re-elect Howard Michel, WB2ITX,
    as Chief Executive Officer. Michel was in the post for 15 months.
    Former ARRL Chief Financial Officer and Chief Executive Officer Barry
    Shelley, N1VXY, has come out of retirement to serve as interim ARRL
    CEO. He also was elected as Secretary. Shelley was ARRL's CFO for 28
    years and served as CEO during 2018 before his retirement, following
    the departure of former CEO Tom Gallagher, NY2RF. The ARRL Board has
    appointed a committee to spearhead the search for a new CEO. That panel
    will screen suitable CEO candidates, presenting three to the Board for
    consideration.

    In other action, former ARRL President and IARU Secretary Rod Stafford,
    W6ROD, was elected International Affairs Vice President, succeeding Jay
    Bellows, K0QB, who did not seek another term. Also re-elected by the
    Board were Treasurer Rick Niswander, K7GM, and Chief Financial Officer
    Diane Middleton, W2DLM.

    Elected as members of the Executive Committee were Atlantic Division
    Director Tom Abernethy, W3TOM; Central Division Director Kermit
    Carlson, W9XA; Roanoke Division Director Bud Hippisley, W2RU; New
    England Division Director Fred Hopengarten, K1VR, and Great Lakes
    Division Director Dale Williams, WA8EFK. The Executive Committee
    addresses and makes decisions regarding ARRL business that may arise
    between scheduled Board meetings.

    Hudson Division Director Ria Jairam, N2RJ, was elected as a member of
    the ARRL Foundation Board for a 3-year term. Tim Duffy, K3LR, and Jim
    Fenstermaker, K9JF, were elected to the Foundation Board for 3-year
    terms as non-ARRL Board members.

    Relief From Private Land-Use Restrictions

    The Hoc Legislative vocacy Committee provided the Board with
    drafts outlining three legislative approaches to address relief for
    radio amateurs facing private land-use restrictions impacting outdoor
    antennas. The Board signed off on the draft legislative approaches "as
    presented and possibly modified" and directed the committee "to proceed
    to obtain congressional sponsorship, employing any of these three
    approaches and using its best judgment on any alterations or
    modifications that our advisors or sponsors may require or suggest."

    HF Band Planning

    Outgoing chair of the HF Band Planning Committee Greg Widin, K0GW,
    presented the panel's report and entertained questions. Board members
    noted that staff turnover and funding limitations at the FCC might
    impact ARRL's efforts to tweak the bands. The Board agreed that ARRL
    would post the report and solicit comments from members on it.

    Contests and Operating Awards

    Radio Amateurs of Canada President
    Glenn MacDonell, VE3XRA (left), and
    IARU President Tim Ellam,
    VE6SH/G4HUA, conveyed greetings from
    their respective organizations.
    Seated behind them is ARRL Technical
    Relations Specialist Jon Siverling,
    WB3ERA. [Michelle Patnode, W3MVP,
    photo]

    The Board approved raising the maximum number of contacts a Field Day
    GOTA station can make to 1,000. It amended the ARRL RTTY Roundup rules
    to add Multi-Two and Multi-Multi categories and to permit multioperator
    stations to operate for the entire contest period, and it divided entry
    categories into RTTY only, Digital only (i.e., no RTTY), and Mixed
    (both RTTY and digital).

    Matt Holden, K0BBC, presented the DX visory Committee report, telling
    the Board that the panel engaged in extensive discussion on a proposal
    to change the 5-Band DXCC award from the current required band to offer
    credit for any five bands. The committee unanimously rejected the
    proposal.

    ARRL Elections

    The Board revised rules governing ARRL Division and Section Manager
    elections to clarify some terminology, to extend the campaign period
    from the call for nominations to the deadline for ballots received, and
    to make other miscellaneous changes. Revisions will become effective by
    February 15, 2020.

    The Board elected Greg
    Widin, K0GW, as an
    ARRL Honorary Vice
    President. [Rick
    Lindquist, WW1ME,
    photo]

    In the interest of "openness and fairness," the Board also approved a
    measure that would offer candidates and members an opportunity to be
    present during the counting of ballots. Candidates may also designate
    one ARRL member to attend as a surrogate if they're unable to observe
    ballot counting, or to accompany them at the count. The Board further
    approved an amendment to permit ARRL members, upon petition, to travel
    at their own expense to witness the counting of ballots from their
    Division.

    The Board charged the Programs and Services Committee to consider
    changes to the ARRL By-Laws that would give members, upon petition, the
    opportunity to attend the public portion of the Annual Meeting in
    January. The number of members permitted to attend would be subject to
    available space and fire code regulations.

    Public Service Enhancement Working Group Chair, Roanoke Division
    Director Bud Hippisley, W2RU, reported that with field adoption of the
    2019 ARES Plan now under way, the group is putting increased focus on
    the National Traffic System, including plans for dialog with
    representatives of Radio Relay International.

    Reduced Dues for Younger Applicants