• Why can I hear myself talk?

    From Cindy Haglund@1:124/6308.20 to all on Mon Jun 9 20:06:18 2008
    A cyberfriend asked me if I can hear myself talk. Being late deaf I do
    have speech. I too thought if you can't hear at all you wouldn't hear
    yourself talk but I DO even though my test says I'm zero .. etc etc
    etc. blah blahblahblah...

    Anybody know anything about this? Thanks. Cindy




    ... I *did* read the docs. That's why I'm confused.

    --- PPoint 3.01
    * Origin: Up a palm tree (1:124/6308.20)
  • From Barbara McNay@1:382/48 to Cindy Haglund on Fri Aug 22 21:00:38 2008
    A cyberfriend asked me if I can hear myself talk.
    Being late deaf I do
    have speech. I too thought if you can't hear at all
    you wouldn't hear
    yourself talk but I DO even though my test says I'm
    zero .. etc etc
    etc. blah blahblahblah...

    Anybody know anything about this? Thanks. Cindy

    I don't *know* why you can hear yourself, but you did say some time back that you get a sound track when you see physical events happen. Maybe this is a manifestation of that. Do you sound normal to yourself or not?

    Another thing that occurred to me (belatedly) about your communication problems: Do you have a cellphone? If not, do some homework. They can be made to vibrate instead of make noise when a call or text comes in, and there ought to be a number of people who will be perfectly willing to text message with you. I had to get a new phone recently, and I was interested to see that it has TTY capability, too, although I haven'y called a business's TTY number yet to try it out.

    This won't help with voice calls or voice mail, of course, but someone could record a greeting for you to the effect that they need to text or call this other number to speak with someone.

    ---
    * Origin: T E X A S ! (1:382/48)
  • From Allen Prunty@1:2320/100 to Barbara Mcnay on Sat Aug 23 01:45:02 2008
    Barbara Mcnay wrote:
    A cyberfriend asked me if I can hear myself talk.
    Being late deaf I do
    have speech. I too thought if you can't hear at all
    you wouldn't hear
    yourself talk but I DO even though my test says I'm
    zero .. etc etc
    etc. blah blahblahblah...

    Anybody know anything about this? Thanks. Cindy

    I don't *know* why you can hear yourself, but you did say some time back that you get a sound track when you see physical events happen. Maybe this is a manifestation of that. Do you sound normal to yourself or not?

    Sound is received by the mechanical process of soundwaves vibrating the eardrum and the process that converts it to nerve impulses.

    Your mind remembers the sound waves and the words... you can hear
    yourself talk because your mind has all the "data" necessary to process
    your voice into the nerve impulses internally to make the words audible without having to go through the mechanical process of conversion.

    Hope that helps.

    Allen
    --- Platinum Xpress/Win/WINServer v3.0pr5
    * Origin: Derby City LiveWire - telnet://derbycitybbs.com (1:2320/100)
  • From Barbara McNay@1:382/48 to Allen Prunty on Sat Aug 23 20:12:34 2008
    Barbara Mcnay wrote:
    A cyberfriend asked me if I can hear myself talk.
    Being late deaf I do
    have speech. I too thought if you can't hear at all
    you wouldn't hear
    yourself talk but I DO even though my test says I'm
    zero .. etc etc
    etc. blah blahblahblah...

    Anybody know anything about this? Thanks. Cindy

    I don't *know* why you can hear yourself, but you did say some time back th
    at
    you get a sound track when you see physical events happen. Maybe this is a
    manifestation of that. Do you sound normal to yourself or not?

    Sound is received by the mechanical process of
    soundwaves vibrating the
    eardrum and the process that converts it to nerve
    impulses.

    Your mind remembers the sound waves and the words...
    you can hear
    yourself talk because your mind has all the "data"
    necessary to process
    your voice into the nerve impulses internally to make
    the words audible
    without having to go through the mechanical process of
    conversion.

    Hope that helps.

    Yes, that's interesting, although I think Cindy carries that to a greater degree, being able (IIRC) to "hear" external things she witnesses. I remember what things sound like, but if I am unable to hear them at all now, then I don't "remember" the sound when I witness a noisy event. OTOH, as what's left of my hearing changes because of a cold, shampoo water in my ears, etc., my voice sounds different to me because I can actually hear it.

    ---
    * Origin: T E X A S ! (1:382/48)
  • From Allen Prunty@1:2320/100 to Barbara Mcnay on Sat Aug 23 23:00:30 2008
    Yes, that's interesting, although I think Cindy carries that to a
    greater degree, being able (IIRC) to "hear" external things she
    witnesses. I remember what things sound like, but if I am unable to
    hear them at all now, then I don't "remember" the sound when I
    witness a noisy event. OTOH, as what's left of my hearing changes
    because of a cold, shampoo water in my ears, etc., my voice sounds different to me because I can actually hear it.+

    Barbara,

    The human mind is amazing!

    First off... no one knows just how much of it we are actually tapping...
    I know from practicing martial arts that you can become so attuned to
    your body that with the power of mind over body you can literally wiggle
    your pinkie toe without moving any other part of your foot. That is a
    level of control that few can achieve.

    Secondly... there are people who can feel vibrations ... in other parts
    of their body. I know a deaf dancer who can dance ballet ... never miss
    a beat... however she needs two monitor speakers placed on the floor so
    that she can feel the vibrations of the music. In some ways this is
    adaptive hearing.

    Thirdly... how can you explain blind people who learn how to echo locate
    with sound?

    The mind is a very weird and powerful force. I know from years of
    martial arts that I can isolate a body part and move it without moving
    other muscles... this is something not everyone can do. But it's
    accomplished through meditation and focus.

    Perhaps if you meditate and focus you can use your mind's ear to hear
    birds when you see them... maybe not the actual birds that are present
    but memories of the birds you have heard in the past.

    This makes me wonder if someone who lost their hearing back in the day
    when all phones had real metal bells in them hear bells when the phones
    ring instead of the electronic cacophony that you hear nowadays.

    Allen




    --- Platinum Xpress/Win/WINServer v3.0pr5
    * Origin: Derby City LiveWire - telnet://derbycitybbs.com (1:2320/100)
  • From Barbara McNay@1:382/48 to Allen Prunty on Sun Aug 24 13:00:26 2008
    Yes, that's interesting, although I think Cindy carries that to a
    greater degree, being able (IIRC) to "hear" external things she
    witnesses. I remember what things sound like, but if I am unable to
    hear them at all now, then I don't "remember" the sound when I
    witness a noisy event. OTOH, as what's left of my hearing changes
    because of a cold, shampoo water in my ears, etc., my voice sounds
    different to me because I can actually hear it.+

    Barbara,

    The human mind is amazing!

    First off... no one knows just how much of it we are
    actually tapping...

    Agreed.

    I know from practicing martial arts that you can
    become so attuned to
    your body that with the power of mind over body you
    can literally wiggle
    your pinkie toe without moving any other part of your
    foot. That is a
    level of control that few can achieve.

    Agreed, and this, I imagine, uses a lot of energy.

    Secondly... there are people who can feel vibrations
    ... in other parts
    of their body. I know a deaf dancer who can dance
    ballet ... never miss
    a beat... however she needs two monitor speakers
    placed on the floor so
    that she can feel the vibrations of the music. In
    some ways this is adaptive hearing.

    Yes. For myself, I was interested to note that some things , like computers, making noise made a vibration that I could feel in my hand ... but as I became unable to hear the noise, I also became unable to feel the vibration. fireworks and over-loud auto woofers, though, I can feel whether I can hear them or not.

    Thirdly... how can you explain blind people who learn
    how to echo locate
    with sound?

    I assumed they have normal hearing in both ears and thus are able to do it. Referencing your paragraph below, it seems to me to be much like hearing a bird
    and detecting where it is from the sound.

    The mind is a very weird and powerful force. I know
    from years of
    martial arts that I can isolate a body part and move
    it without moving
    other muscles... this is something not everyone can
    do. But it's
    accomplished through meditation and focus.

    Perhaps if you meditate and focus you can use your
    mind's ear to hear
    birds when you see them... maybe not the actual birds
    that are present
    but memories of the birds you have heard in the past.

    Heh. I've never really been able to hear the singing birds well, if at all, much less locate the bird that was making the noise. Imagining all birds to sound like roosters or cranky parrots is a bit over the top. [g]

    This makes me wonder if someone who lost their hearing
    back in the day
    when all phones had real metal bells in them hear
    bells when the phones
    ring instead of the electronic cacophony that you hear
    nowadays.

    An interesting question.

    ---
    * Origin: T E X A S ! (1:382/48)
  • From Allen Prunty@1:2320/100 to Barbara Mcnay on Wed Aug 27 18:19:36 2008
    Barbara,

    Mind if I ask how you lost your hearing? I have a cousin who has Minnears disease and she gets so dizzy that it's debilitating. There is a surgery that will give her a quality of life she doesn't have now... but she would trade her

    hearing as it would damage essential nerves for hearing.

    She's almost decided to have the surgery since she can not stand up and
    walk more than 20 steps before the dizzyness overtakes her.

    Allen
    --- Platinum Xpress/Win/WINServer v3.0pr5
    * Origin: Derby City LiveWire - telnet://derbycitybbs.com (1:2320/100)
  • From Barbara McNay@1:382/48 to Allen Prunty on Thu Aug 28 19:30:08 2008
    Barbara,

    Mind if I ask how you lost your hearing? I have a
    cousin who has Minnears
    disease and she gets so dizzy that it's debilitating.
    There is a surgery that
    will give her a quality of life she doesn't have
    now... but she would trade her
    hearing as it would damage essential nerves for
    hearing.

    She should do as much research as possible.

    http://www.dizziness-and-balance.com/index.html

    This site might or might not be relevant. There's a lot of stuff I haven't looked at.

    She's almost decided to have the surgery since she can
    not stand up and
    walk more than 20 steps before the dizzyness overtakes
    her.

    Not good. I'm guessing that using a scooter or wheelchair isn't an adequate defense against her dizzyness.

    I was born with nerve deafness, although I could hear a lot better as a child.
    My hearing has deteriorated in my senior citizen years.

    ---
    * Origin: T E X A S ! (1:382/48)
  • From Barbara McNay@1:382/48 to Allen Prunty on Thu Aug 28 19:44:20 2008
    Barbara,

    Mind if I ask how you lost your hearing? I have a
    cousin who has Minnears
    disease and she gets so dizzy that it's debilitating.
    There is a surgery that
    will give her a quality of life she doesn't have
    now... but she would trade her
    hearing as it would damage essential nerves for
    hearing.

    She should do as much research as possible.

    http://www.dizziness-and-balance.com/index.html

    This site might or might not be relevant. There's a
    lot of stuff I haven't looked at.

    There is a search box at the top right of the page. Type in
    Meniere's
    and you will get a list of items about it.

    She's almost decided to have the surgery since she can
    not stand up and
    walk more than 20 steps before the dizzyness overtakes
    her.

    Not good. I'm guessing that using a scooter or
    wheelchair isn't an adequate defense against her
    dizzyness.

    I was born with nerve deafness, although I could hear
    a lot better as a child. My hearing has deteriorated
    in my senior citizen years.

    ---
    * Origin: T E X A S ! (1:382/48)