• Daily APOD Report

    From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun May 21 01:02:12 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 May 21
    An usual looking creature is pictured which may appear alien but is
    actually a Earth-dwelling tardigrade. The tardigrade has no apparent
    eyes, a light brown body, a circular gear-like snout, and claws at the
    end of its numerous feet. The tardigrade is seen perched on green moss.
    Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    Tardigrade in Moss
    Image Credit & Copyright: Nicole Ottawa & Oliver Meckes / Eye of
    Science / Science Source Images

    Explanation: Is this an alien? Probably not, but of all the animals on
    Earth, the tardigrade might be the best candidate. That's because
    tardigrades are known to be able to go for decades without food or
    water, to survive temperatures from near absolute zero to well above
    the boiling point of water, to survive pressures from near zero to well
    above that on ocean floors, and to survive direct exposure to dangerous
    radiations. The far-ranging survivability of these extremophiles was
    tested in 2011 outside an orbiting space shuttle. Tardigrades are so
    durable partly because they can repair their own DNA and reduce their
    body water content to a few percent. Some of these miniature
    water-bears almost became extraterrestrials in 2011 when they were
    launched toward to the Martian moon Phobos, and again in 2021 when they
    were launched toward Earth's own moon, but the former launch failed,
    and the latter landing crashed. Tardigrades are more common than humans
    across most of the Earth. Pictured here in a color-enhanced electron
    micrograph, a millimeter-long tardigrade crawls on moss.

    Your Sky Surprise: What picture did APOD feature on your birthday?
    (post 1995)
    Tomorrow's picture: sea blue sky
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon May 22 00:05:16 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 May 22
    A sprawling spiral galaxy is pictured with a new bright spot visible
    near the image bottom. This spot is a recently discovered supernova. A
    roll-over image shows the same galaxy in an image taken the previous
    month without the new supernova spot. Please see the explanation for
    more detailed information.

    Supernova Discovered in Nearby Spiral Galaxy M101
    Image Credit & Copyright: Craig Stocks

    Explanation: A nearby star has exploded and humanity's telescopes are
    turning to monitor it. The supernova, dubbed SN 2023ixf, was discovered
    by Japanese astronomer Koichi Itagaki three days ago and subsequently
    located on automated images from the Zwicky Transient Facility two days
    earlier. SN 2023ixf occurred in the photogenic Pinwheel Galaxy M101,
    which, being only about 21 million light years away, makes it the
    closest supernova seen in the past five years, the second closest in
    the past 10 years, and the second supernova found in M101 in the past
    15 years. Rapid follow up observations already indicate that SN 2023ixf
    is a Type II supernova, an explosion that occurs after a massive star
    runs out of nuclear fuel and collapses. The featured image shows home
    spiral galaxy two days ago with the supernova highlighted, while the
    roll-over image shows the same galaxy a month before. SN 2023ixf will
    likely brighten and remain visible to telescopes for months. Studying
    such a close and young Type II supernova may yield new clues about
    massive stars and how they explode.

    Tomorrow's picture: just above jupiter
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue May 23 00:22:50 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 May 23
    The cloud tops of Jupiter are pictured in a closeup flyby of the Juno
    spacecraft. A big white oval cloud is visible in the foreground, while
    many swirls of many muted colors are visible trailing behind. A dark
    night sky is in the background. Please see the explanation for more
    detailed information.

    Jupiter's Swirls from Juno
    Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS; Processing & License: Kevin
    M. Gill

    Explanation: Big storms are different on Jupiter. On Earth, huge
    hurricanes and colossal cyclones are centered on regions of low
    pressure, but on Jupiter, it is the high-pressure, anti-cyclone storms
    that are the largest. On Earth, large storms can last weeks, but on
    Jupiter they can last years. On Earth, large storms can be as large as
    a country, but on Jupiter, large storms can be as large as planet
    Earth. Both types of storms are known to exhibit lightning. The
    featured image of Jupiter's clouds was composed from images and data
    captured by the robotic Juno spacecraft as it swooped close to the
    massive planet in August 2020. A swirling white oval is visible
    nearby, while numerous smaller cloud swirls extend into the distance.
    On Jupiter, light-colored clouds are usually higher up than dark
    clouds. Despite their differences, studying storm clouds on distant
    Jupiter provides insights into storms and other weather patterns on
    familiar Earth.

    Surf the Universe: Random APOD Generator
    Tomorrow's picture: double occultation
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed May 24 10:17:18 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 May 24
    A dark mountain lies in the center with an observatory building
    sporting two telescope domes. The background sky appears dark blue.
    Behind the center of the observatory is part of a crescent moon, with
    an unusual bright spot to its upper left. Please see the explanation
    for more detailed information.

    Observatory Aligned with Moon Occulting Jupiter
    Image Credit & Copyright: Rick Whitacre; Text: Natalia Lewandowska
    (SUNY Oswego)

    Explanation: Sometimes we witness the Moon moving directly in front of
    -- called occulting -- one of the planets in our Solar System. Earlier
    this month that planet was Jupiter. Captured here was the moment when
    Jupiter re-appeared from behind the surface of our Moon. The Moon was
    in its third quarter, two days before the dark New Moon. Now, our Moon
    is continuously half lit by the Sun, but when in its third quarter,
    relatively little of that half can be seen from the Earth. Pictured,
    the Moon itself was aligned behind the famous Lick Observatory in
    California, USA, on the summit of Mount Hamilton. Coincidentally, Lick
    enabled the discovery of a moon of Jupiter: Amalthea, the last visually
    detected moon of Jupiter after Galileo's observations.

    Gallery: Moon Occults Jupiter in 2023 May: Notable Submissions to APOD
    Tomorrow's picture: in a cat's eye
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu May 25 00:43:32 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 May 25

    Cat's Eye Wide and Deep
    Image Credit & Copyright: Jean-Fran+ois Bax, Guillaume Gruntz

    Explanation: The Cat's Eye Nebula (NGC 6543) is one of the best known
    planetary nebulae in the sky. Its more familiar outlines are seen in
    the brighter central region of the nebula in this impressive wide-angle
    view. But this wide and deep image combining data from two telescopes
    also reveals its extremely faint outer halo. At an estimated distance
    of 3,000 light-years, the faint outer halo is over 5 light-years
    across. Planetary nebulae have long been appreciated as a final phase
    in the life of a sun-like star. More recently, some planetary nebulae
    are found to have halos like this one, likely formed of material
    shrugged off during earlier episodes in the star's evolution. While the
    planetary nebula phase is thought to last for around 10,000 years,
    astronomers estimate the age of the outer filamentary portions of this
    halo to be 50,000 to 90,000 years. Visible on the right, some 50
    million light-years beyond the watchful planetary nebula, lies spiral
    galaxy NGC 6552.

    Tomorrow's picture: Virgo Cluster Galaxies
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri May 26 02:17:26 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 May 26

    Virgo Cluster Galaxies
    Image Credit & Copyright: Abdullah Alharbi

    Explanation: Galaxies of the Virgo Cluster are scattered across this
    nearly 4 degree wide telescopic field of view. About 50 million
    light-years distant, the Virgo Cluster is the closest large galaxy
    cluster to our own local galaxy group. Prominent here are Virgo's
    bright elliptical galaxies Messier catalog, M87 at bottom center, and
    M84 and M86 (top to bottom) near top left. M84 and M86 are recognized
    as part of Markarian's Chain, a visually striking line-up of galaxies
    on the left side of this frame. Near the middle of the chain lies an
    intriguing interacting pair of galaxies, NGC 4438 and NGC 4435, known
    to some as Markarian's Eyes. Of course giant elliptical galaxy M87
    dominates the Virgo cluster. It's the home of a super massive black
    hole, the first black hole ever imaged by planet Earth's Event Horizon
    Telescope.

    Tomorrow's picture: Crescent Neptune and Triton
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat May 27 01:56:42 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 May 27
    The picture shows the planet Neptune and its moon Triton, both in
    crescent phases, as captured by the passing Voyager 2 spacecraft in
    1989. Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    Crescent Neptune and Triton
    Image Credit: NASA, Voyager 2

    Explanation: Gliding through the outer Solar System, in 1989 the
    Voyager 2 spacecraft looked toward the Sun to find this view of most
    distant planet Neptune and its moon Triton together in a crescent
    phase. The elegant image of ice-giant planet and largest moon was taken
    from behind just after Voyager's closest approach. It could not have
    been taken from Earth because the most distant planet never shows a
    crescent phase to sunward eyes. Heading for the heliopause and beyond,
    the spacecraft's parting vantage point also robs Neptune of its
    familiar blue hue.

    Tomorrow's picture: an unexpected moon
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun May 28 01:50:34 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 May 28
    A pair of asteroids are shown with a large, elongated and cratered one
    on the left and a much smaller one on the far right. Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    Ida and Dactyl: Asteroid and Moon
    Image Credit: NASA, JPL, Galileo Mission

    Explanation: This asteroid has a moon. The robot spacecraft Galileo on
    route to Jupiter in 1993 encountered and photographed two asteroids
    during its long interplanetary voyage. The second minor planet it
    photographed, 243 Ida, was unexpectedly discovered to have a moon. The
    tiny moon, Dactyl, is only about 1.6 kilometers across and seen as a
    small dot on the right of the sharpened featured image. In contrast,
    the potato-shaped Ida is much larger, measuring about 60 kilometers
    long and 25 km wide. Dactyl is the first moon of an asteroid ever
    discovered -- now many asteroids are known to have moons. The names Ida
    and Dactyl are from Greek mythology.

    Tomorrow's picture: sea blue sky
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon May 29 00:53:56 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 May 29
    A shoreline glowing with blue bioluminescent plankton is shown, with a
    stand of trees in the distance. Above all is a starry sky which
    includes red nebulae and the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy.
    Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    Milky Way over a Turquoise Wonderland
    Image Credit & Copyright: Petr Hor+lek / Institute of Physics in Opava,
    Sovena Jani

    Explanation: What glows there? The answer depends: sea or sky? In the
    sea, the unusual blue glow is bioluminescence. Specifically, the
    glimmer arises from Noctiluca scintillans, single-celled plankton
    stimulated by the lapping waves. The plankton use their glow to startle
    and illuminate predators. This mid-February display on an island in the
    Maldives was so intense that the astrophotographer described it as a
    turquoise wonderland. In the sky, by contrast, are the more familiar
    glows of stars and nebulas. The white band rising from the
    artificially-illuminated green plants is created by billions of stars
    in the central disk of our Milky Way Galaxy. Also visible in the sky is
    the star cluster Omega Centauri, toward the left, and the famous
    Southern Cross asterism in the center. Red-glowing nebulas include the
    bright Carina Nebula, just right of center, and the expansive Gum
    Nebula on the upper right.

    Tomorrow's picture: nebular bell
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue May 30 00:34:02 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 May 30
    An expansive interstellar gas cloud is shown with an orange interior
    and outer blue filaments. Many stars are visible in the dark
    background. Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    M27: The Dumbbell Nebula
    Image Credit & Copyright: Patrick A. Cosgrove

    Explanation: Is this what will become of our Sun? Quite possibly. The
    first hint of our Sun's future was discovered inadvertently in 1764. At
    that time, Charles Messier was compiling a list of diffuse objects not
    to be confused with comets. The 27th object on Messier's list, now
    known as M27 or the Dumbbell Nebula, is a planetary nebula, one of the
    brightest planetary nebulae on the sky and visible with binoculars
    toward the constellation of the Fox (Vulpecula). It takes light about
    1000 years to reach us from M27, featured here in colors emitted by
    sulfur (red), hydrogen (green) and oxygen (blue). We now know that in
    about 6 billion years, our Sun will shed its outer gases into a
    planetary nebula like M27, while its remaining center will become an
    X-ray hot white dwarf star. Understanding the physics and significance
    of M27 was well beyond 18th century science, though. Even today, many
    things remain mysterious about planetary nebulas, including how their
    intricate shapes are created.

    Tomorrow's picture: watch a galaxy form
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed May 31 00:22:08 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 May 31

    Simulation: A Disk Galaxy Forms
    Video Credit: TNG Collaboration, MPCDF, FAS Harvard U.; Music: World's
    Sunrise (YouTube: Jimena Contreras)

    Explanation: How did we get here? We know that we live on a planet
    orbiting a star orbiting a galaxy, but how did all of this form? Since
    our universe moves too slowly to watch, faster-moving computer
    simulations are created to help find out. Specifically, this featured
    video from the IllustrisTNG collaboration tracks gas from the early
    universe (redshift 12) until today (redshift 0). As the simulation
    begins, ambient gas falls into and accumulates in a region of
    relatively high gravity. After a few billion years, a well-defined
    center materializes from a strange and fascinating cosmic dance. Gas
    blobs -- some representing small satellite galaxies -- continue to fall
    into and become absorbed by the rotating galaxy as the present epoch is
    reached and the video ends. For the Milky Way Galaxy, however, big
    mergers may not be over -- recent evidence indicates that our large
    spiral disk Galaxy will collide and coalesce with the slightly larger
    Andromeda spiral disk galaxy in the next few billion years.

    Open Science: Browse 3,000+ codes in the Astrophysics Source Code
    Library
    Tomorrow's picture: recycling a star
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Jun 1 12:16:12 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 1

    Recycling Cassiopeia A
    Image Credit: X-ray - NASA, CXC, SAO; Optical - NASA,STScI

    Explanation: Massive stars in our Milky Way Galaxy live spectacular
    lives. Collapsing from vast cosmic clouds, their nuclear furnaces
    ignite and create heavy elements in their cores. After a few million
    years, the enriched material is blasted back into interstellar space
    where star formation can begin anew. The expanding debris cloud known
    as Cassiopeia A is an example of this final phase of the stellar life
    cycle. Light from the explosion which created this supernova remnant
    would have been first seen in planet Earth's sky about 350 years ago,
    although it took that light about 11,000 years to reach us. This
    false-color image, composed of X-ray and optical image data from the
    Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope, shows the still
    hot filaments and knots in the remnant. It spans about 30 light-years
    at the estimated distance of Cassiopeia A. High-energy X-ray emission
    from specific elements has been color coded, silicon in red, sulfur in
    yellow, calcium in green and iron in purple, to help astronomers
    explore the recycling of our galaxy's star stuff. Still expanding, the
    outer blast wave is seen in blue hues. The bright speck near the center
    is a neutron star, the incredibly dense, collapsed remains of the
    massive stellar core.

    Tomorrow's picture: massive galaxy
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Jun 2 00:09:14 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 2

    Messier 101
    Image Credit: NASA, ESA, CFHT, NOAO;
    Acknowledgement - K.Kuntz (GSFC), F.Bresolin (U.Hawaii), J.Trauger
    (JPL), J.Mould (NOAO), Y.-H.Chu (U. Illinois)

    Explanation: Big, beautiful spiral galaxy M101 is one of the last
    entries in Charles Messier's famous catalog, but definitely not one of
    the least. About 170,000 light-years across, this galaxy is enormous,
    almost twice the size of our own Milky Way. M101 was also one of the
    original spiral nebulae observed by Lord Rosse's large 19th century
    telescope, the Leviathan of Parsontown. Assembled from 51 exposures
    recorded by the Hubble Space Telescope in the 20th and 21st centuries,
    with additional data from ground based telescopes, this mosaic spans
    about 40,000 light-years across the central region of M101 in one of
    the highest definition spiral galaxy portraits ever released from
    Hubble. The sharp image shows stunning features of the galaxy's face-on
    disk of stars and dust along with background galaxies, some visible
    right through M101 itself. Also known as the Pinwheel Galaxy, M101 lies
    within the boundaries of the northern constellation Ursa Major, about
    25 million light-years away.

    Tomorrow's picture: Portrait of Charon
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Jun 3 00:33:58 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 3

    Charon: Moon of Pluto
    Image Credit: NASA, Johns Hopkins Univ./APL, Southwest Research
    Institute, U.S. Naval Observatory

    Explanation: A darkened and mysterious north polar region known to some
    as Mordor Macula caps this premier high-resolution view. The portrait
    of Charon, Pluto's largest moon, was captured by New Horizons near the
    spacecraft's closest approach on July 14, 2015. The combined blue, red,
    and infrared data was processed to enhance colors and follow variations
    in Charon's surface properties with a resolution of about 2.9
    kilometers (1.8 miles). A stunning image of Charon's Pluto-facing
    hemisphere, it also features a clear view of an apparently
    moon-girdling belt of fractures and canyons that seems to separate
    smooth southern plains from varied northern terrain. Charon is 1,214
    kilometers (754 miles) across. That's about 1/10th the size of planet
    Earth but a whopping 1/2 the diameter of Pluto itself, and makes it the
    largest satellite relative to its parent body in the Solar System.
    Still, the moon appears as a small bump at about the 1 o'clock position
    on Pluto's disk in the grainy, negative,telescopic picture inset at
    upper left. That view was used by James Christy and Robert Harrington
    at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Flagstaff to discover Charon in June
    of 1978.

    Tomorrow's picture: look beyond
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Jun 4 01:30:58 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 4
    A black and white line drawing depicts a person peering outside of a
    spherical room into a greater universe. Please see the explanation for
    more detailed information.

    Color the Universe
    Image Credit: Unknown, possibly C. Flammarion

    Explanation: Wouldn't it be fun to color in the universe? If you think
    so, please accept this famous astronomical illustration as a
    preliminary substitute. You, your friends, your parents or children,
    can print it out or even color it digitally. While coloring, you might
    be interested to know that even though this illustration has appeared
    in numerous places over the past 100 years, the actual artist remains
    unknown. Furthermore, the work has no accepted name -- can you think of
    a good one? The illustration, first appearing in a book by Camille
    Flammarion in 1888, is frequently used to show that humanity's present
    concepts are susceptible to being supplanted by greater truths.

    Tomorrow's picture: a nebular trifecta
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Jun 5 00:45:26 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 5
    A bright red gaseous nebula is pictures with three dark dust lanes
    meeting in the center. The top of the nebula appears blue. Please see
    the explanation for more detailed information.

    In the Center of the Trifid Nebula
    Image Credit & Copyright: Martin Pugh

    Explanation: What's happening at the center of the Trifid Nebula? Three
    prominent dust lanes that give the Trifid its name all come together.
    Mountains of opaque dust appear near the bottom, while other dark
    filaments of dust are visible threaded throughout the nebula. A single
    massive star visible near the center causes much of the Trifid's glow.
    The Trifid, cataloged as M20, is only about 300,000 years old, making
    it among the youngest emission nebulas known. The star forming nebula
    lies about 9,000 light years away toward the constellation of the
    Archer (Sagittarius). The region pictured here spans about 20 light
    years.

    Portal Universe: Random APOD Generator
    Tomorrow's picture: planet killer
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Jun 6 00:37:54 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 6

    Star Eats Planet
    Illustrative Video Credit: K. Miller & R. Hurt (Caltech, IPAC)

    Explanation: ItCs the end of a world as we know it. Specifically, the
    Sun-like star ZTF SLRN-2020 was seen eating one of its own planets.
    Although many a planet eventually dies by spiraling into their central
    star, the 2020 event, involving a Jupiter-like planet, was the first
    time it was seen directly. The star ZTF SLRN-2020 lies about 12,000
    light years from the Sun toward the constellation of the Eagle
    (Aquila). In the featured animated illustration of the incident, the
    gas planet's atmosphere is first pictured being stripped away as it
    skims along the outskirts of the attracting star. Some of the planet's
    gas is absorbed into the star's atmosphere, while other gas is expelled
    into space. By the video's end, the planet is completely engulfed and
    falls into the star's center, causing the star's outer atmosphere to
    briefly expand, heat up, and brighten. One day, about eight billion
    years from now, planet Earth may spiral into our Sun.

    Tomorrow's picture: ring galaxy ring
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Jun 7 01:04:34 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 7
    A spiral galaxy is seen in the image center with a distinct purple hue.
    The galaxy features a bright inner ring, but even outside of that
    appears another large ring. The outer rings appears light brown.
    Foreground stars are visible throughout the image. Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    M94: A Double Ring Galaxy
    Image Credit & Copyright: Brian Brennan

    Explanation: Most galaxies don't have any rings of stars and gas -- why
    does M94 have two? First, spiral galaxy M94 has an inner ring of newly
    formed stars surrounding its nucleus, giving it not only an unusual
    appearance but also a strong interior glow. A leading origin hypothesis
    holds that an elongated knot of stars known as a bar rotates in M94 and
    has generated a burst of star formation in this inner ring.
    Observations have also revealed another ring, an outer ring, one that
    is more faint, different in color, not closed, and relatively complex.
    What caused this outer ring is currently unknown. M94, pictured here,
    spans about 45,000 light years in total, lies about 15 million light
    years away, and can be seen with a small telescope toward the
    constellation of the Hunting Dogs (Canes Venatici).

    More Availability: APOD now accessible via Flipboard.
    Tomorrow's picture: open space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Jun 8 23:17:56 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 8

    Elephant's Trunk and Caravan
    Image Credit & Copyright: Steve Cannistra (StarryWonders)

    Explanation: Like an illustration in a galactic Just So Story, the
    Elephant's Trunk Nebula winds through the emission region and young
    star cluster complex IC 1396, in the high and far off constellation of
    Cepheus. Seen on the left the cosmic elephant's trunk, also known as
    vdB 142, is over 20 light-years long. This detailed telescopic view
    features the bright swept-back ridges and pockets of cool interstellar
    dust and gas that abound in the region. But the dark, tendril-shaped
    clouds contain the raw material for star formation and hide protostars
    within. Nearly 3,000 light-years distant, the relatively faint IC 1396
    complex
    covers a large region on the sky, spanning over 5 degrees. This
    rendition spans a 1 degree wide field of view though, about the angular
    size of 2 full moons. Of course the dark shapes below and to the right
    of the outstretched Elephant's Trunk, are known to some as The Caravan.

    Tomorrow's picture: pixels in space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Jun 9 00:54:54 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 9

    Pandora's Cluster of Galaxies
    Image Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, Ivo Labbe (Swinburne), Rachel Bezanson
    (University of Pittsburgh), Processing: Alyssa Pagan (STScI)

    Explanation: This deep field mosaicked image presents a stunning view
    of galaxy cluster Abell 2744 from the James Webb Space Telescope's
    NIRCam. Also dubbed Pandora's Cluster, Abell 2744 itself appears to be
    a ponderous merger of three different massive galaxy clusters some 3.5
    billion light-years away toward the constellation Sculptor. Dominated
    by dark matter, the mega-cluster warps and distorts the fabric of
    spacetime, gravitationally lensing even more distant objects. Redder
    than the Pandora cluster galaxies many of the lensed sources are very
    distant galaxies in the early Universe, stretched and distorted into
    arcs. Of course distinctive diffraction spikes mark foreground Milky
    Way stars. At the Pandora Cluster's estimated distance this cosmic box
    spans about 6 million light-years. But don't panic. You can explore the
    tantalizing region in a 2 minute video tour.

    Tomorrow's picture: light-weekend
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Jun 10 01:04:16 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 10

    Mars and the Beehive
    Image Credit & Copyright: Rolando Ligustri

    Explanation: This month, bright Mars and brilliant Venus are the
    prominent celestial beacons in planet Earth's western skies after
    sunset. Wandering through the constellation Cancer the Crab, the Red
    Planet was captured here on the evening of June 3 near the stars of
    open cluster Messier 44. Recognized since antiquity this nearby,
    naked-eye star cluster is also known as the Praesepe or the Beehive
    cluster. A swarm of stars all much younger than the Sun, the Beehive
    cluster is a mere 600 light-years distant. Seen with a yellowish hue,
    Mars is about 17 light-minutes away. On June 12/13 Venus will take its
    turn posing next to the stars of the Beehive cluster. But the dazzling
    light of Venus will make the Beehive stars difficult to see by eye
    alone.

    Tomorrow's picture: the spectrum of the Sun
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Jun 11 00:21:52 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 11
    A rainbow of the Sun's colors is shown from deep red on the upper left
    to deep blue on the lower right. Some horizontal lines have gaps that
    appear dark where some colors are missing. the image. Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    The Sun and Its Missing Colors
    Image Credit: Nigel Sharp (NSF), FTS, NSO, KPNO, AURA, NSF

    Explanation: Here are all the visible colors of the Sun, produced by
    passing the Sun's light through a prism-like device. The spectrum was
    created at the McMath-Pierce Solar Observatory and shows, first off,
    that although our white-appearing Sun emits light of nearly every
    color, it appears brightest in yellow-green light. The dark patches in
    the featured spectrum arise from gas at or above the Sun's surface
    absorbing sunlight emitted below. Since different types of gas absorb
    different colors of light, it is possible to determine what gasses
    compose the Sun. Helium, for example, was first discovered in 1870 on a
    solar spectrum and only later found here on Earth. Today, the majority
    of spectral absorption lines have been identified - but not all.

    Tomorrow's picture: largest satellites
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    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Jun 12 00:13:28 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 12
    A crescent moon is shown against blue background. Many craters are
    visible in great detail. To the upper left appears some kind of small
    machine which is actually the International Space Station also in orbit
    around the Earth. Please see the explanation for more detailed
    information.

    The Largest Satellites of Earth
    Image Credit & Copyright: Tianyao Yang

    Explanation: WhatCs that near the Moon? ItCs the International Space
    Station (ISS). Although the ISS may appear to be physically near the
    Moon, it is not C it is physically near the Earth. In low Earth orbit
    and circulating around our big blue marble about every 90 minutes, the
    ISS was captured photographically as it crossed nearly in front of the
    Moon. The Moon, itself in a month-long orbit around the Earth, shows a
    crescent phase as only a curving sliver of its Sun-illuminated half is
    visible from the Earth. The featured image was taken in late March from
    Shanghai, China and shows not only details of Earth's largest
    human-made satellite, but details of the cratered and barren surface of
    Earth's largest natural satellite. Over the next few years, humanity is
    planning to send more people and machines to the Moon than ever before.

    Tomorrow's picture: another two
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Jun 13 07:52:14 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 13

    Moons Across Jupiter
    Image Credit: NASA; ESA, JPL, Cassini Imaging Team, SSI; Processing:
    Kevin M. Gill

    Explanation: Jupiter's moons circle Jupiter. The featured video depicts
    Europa and Io, two of Jupiter's largest moons, crossing in front of the
    grand planet's Great Red Spot, the largest known storm system in our
    Solar System. The video was composed from images taken by the robotic
    Cassini spacecraft as it passed Jupiter in 2000, on its way to Saturn.
    The two moons visible are volcanic Io, in the distance, and icy Europa.
    In the time-lapse video, Europa appears to overtake Io, which is odd
    because Io is closer to Jupiter and moves faster. The explanation is
    that the motion of the fast Cassini spacecraft changes the camera
    location significantly during imaging. Jupiter is currently being
    visited by NASA's robotic Juno spacecraft, while ESA's Jupiter Icy
    Moons Explorer (JUICE), launched in April, is enroute.

    Tomorrow's picture: interstellar predator
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Jun 14 00:25:42 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 14
    A dark brown cloud that appears similar to a shark is seen against a
    background filled with stars and less prominent blue-shaded nebulas.
    Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    The Shark Nebula
    Image Credit & Copyright: Stephen Kennedy

    Explanation: There is no sea on Earth large enough to contain the Shark
    nebula. This predator apparition poses us no danger as it is composed
    only of interstellar gas and dust. Dark dust like that featured here is
    somewhat like cigarette smoke and created in the cool atmospheres of
    giant stars. After being expelled with gas and gravitationally
    recondensing, massive stars may carve intricate structures into their
    birth cloud using their high energy light and fast stellar winds as
    sculpting tools. The heat they generate evaporates the murky molecular
    cloud as well as causing ambient hydrogen gas to disperse and glow red.
    During disintegration, we humans can enjoy imagining these great clouds
    as common icons, like we do for water clouds on Earth. Including
    smaller dust nebulae such as Lynds Dark Nebula 1235 and Van den Bergh
    149 & 150, the Shark nebula spans about 15 light years and lies about
    650 light years away toward the constellation of the King of Aethiopia
    (Cepheus).

    Tomorrow's picture: open space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Jun 15 00:11:36 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 15

    M15: Dense Globular Star Cluster
    Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble Legacy Archive; Processing: Ehsan
    Ebrahimian

    Explanation: Messier 15 is an immense swarm of over 100,000 stars. A 13
    billion year old relic of the early formative years of our galaxy it's
    one of about 170 globular star clusters that still roam the halo of the
    Milky Way. Centered in this sharp reprocessed Hubble image, M15 lies
    some 35,000 light-years away toward the constellation Pegasus. Its
    diameter is about 200 light-years, but more than half its stars are
    packed into the central 10 light-years or so, making one of the densest
    concentrations of stars known. Hubble-based measurements of the
    increasing velocities of M15's central stars are evidence that a
    massive black hole resides at the center of the dense cluster. M15 is
    also known to harbour a planetary nebula. Called Pease 1 (aka PN Ps 1),
    it can be seen in this image as a small blue blob below and just right
    of center.

    Tomorrow's picture: when time lapses
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Jun 16 01:02:34 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 16

    Sunset to Sunrise over the Baltic Sea
    Image Credit & Copyright: Bernd Pr++schold (TWAN)

    Explanation: This serene view from the coast of Sweden looks across the
    Baltic sea and compresses time, presenting the passage of one night in
    a single photograph. From sunset to sunrise, moonlight illuminates the
    creative sea and skyscape. Fleeting clouds, fixed stars, and flowing
    northern lights leave their traces in planet Earth's sky. To construct
    the timelapse image, 3296 video frames were recorded on the night of
    June's Full Moon between 7:04pm and 6:35am local time. As time
    progresses from left to right, a single column of pixels was taken from
    the corresponding individual frame and combined in sequence into a
    single digital image 3296 pixels wide.

    Happy Birthday APOD
    Tomorrow's picture: light-weekend
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Jun 17 00:18:02 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 17

    Planet Earth at Night II
    Video Credit: NASA, Gateway to Astronaut Photography, ISS Expedition
    53; Music: The Low Seas (The 126ers)

    Explanation: Recorded during 2017, timelapse sequences from the
    International Space Station are compiled in this serene video of planet
    Earth at Night. Fans of low Earth orbit can start by enjoying the view
    as green and red aurora borealis slather up the sky. The night scene
    tracks from northwest to southeast across North America, toward the
    Gulf of Mexico and the Florida coast. A second sequence follows
    European city lights, crosses the Mediterranean Sea, and passes over a
    bright Nile river in northern Africa. Seen from the orbital outpost,
    erratic flashes of lightning appear in thunder storms below and stars
    rise above the planet's curved horizon through a faint atmospheric
    airglow. Of course, from home you can always check out the vital signs
    of Planet Earth Now.

    Tomorrow's picture: How many sides does northern Saturn have?
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Jun 18 00:15:00 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 18
    Saturn's north pole is shown with vibrant false colors. The outer
    boundary appears as a rounded hexagon. Please see the explanation for
    more detailed information.

    Saturn's Northern Hexagon
    Image Credit & Copyright: NASA, ESA, JPL, SSI, Cassini Imaging Team

    Explanation: Why would clouds form a hexagon on Saturn? Nobody is sure.
    Originally discovered during the Voyager flybys of Saturn in the 1980s,
    nobody has ever seen anything like it anywhere else in the Solar
    System. Acquiring its first sunlit views of far northern Saturn in late
    2012, the Cassini spacecraft's wide-angle camera recorded this
    stunning, false-color image of the ringed planet's north pole. The
    composite of near-infrared image data results in red hues for low
    clouds and green for high ones, giving the Saturnian cloudscape a vivid
    appearance. This and similar images show the stability of the hexagon
    even 20+ years after Voyager. Movies of Saturn's North Pole show the
    cloud structure maintaining its hexagonal structure while rotating.
    Unlike individual clouds appearing like a hexagon on Earth, the Saturn
    cloud pattern appears to have six well defined sides of nearly equal
    length. Four Earths could fit inside the hexagon. Beyond the cloud tops
    at the upper right, arcs of the planet's eye-catching rings are tinted
    bright blue.

    Tomorrow's picture: space tornado
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Jun 19 00:15:32 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 19
    The center of the Lagoon Nebula is pictured in false colors. Toward the
    center left, dark dust swirls around glowing gas and bright stars.
    Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    The Busy Center of the Lagoon Nebula
    Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble; Processing: Francisco Javier Pobes
    Serrano

    Explanation: The center of the Lagoon Nebula is a whirlwind of
    spectacular star formation. Visible near the image center, at least two
    long funnel-shaped clouds, each roughly half a light-year long, have
    been formed by extreme stellar winds and intense energetic starlight. A
    tremendously bright nearby star, Herschel 36, lights the area. Vast
    walls of dust hide and redden other hot young stars. As energy from
    these stars pours into the cool dust and gas, large temperature
    differences in adjoining regions can be created generating shearing
    winds which may cause the funnels. This picture, spanning about 15
    light years, combines images taken in four colors by the orbiting
    Hubble Space Telescope. The Lagoon Nebula, also known as M8, lies about
    5000 light years distant toward the constellation of the Archer
    (Sagittarius).

    Tomorrow's picture: large galactic bird
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Jun 20 00:06:54 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 20
    Two identical images are shown side by side. On each, a silhouette of a
    person holding a long stick is shown standing on a rock before the sea.
    Above the person, running diagonally, is the central band of our Milky
    Way Galaxy. On the right image, a type of bird called a Nandu is shown
    in outline. Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    The +and+| in the Milky Way
    Image Credit & Copyright: Fefo Bouvier; Line Drawing: Alfonso Rosso

    Explanation: Have you seen the bird in the Milky Way? Beyond the man in
    the Moon, the night sky is filled with stories, and cultures throughout
    history have projected some of their most enduring legends onto the
    stars and dust above. Generations of people see these celestial icons,
    hear their associated stories, and pass them down. Pictured here is not
    only a segment of the central band of our Milky Way galaxy, but,
    according to folklore of several native peoples of Uruguay, the outline
    of a great bird called +and+|. Furthermore, +and+|'s footprint is
    associated with the Southern Cross asterism. In the foreground, in
    silhouette, is a statue of Mar+a Micaela Guyunusa, an indigenous woman
    of the Charr+|a people who lived in the 1800s and endures as a symbol of
    colonial resistance. The composite image was taken in mid-April in Cabo
    Polonio, Uruguay, with the Atlantic Ocean in the background.

    Tomorrow's picture: the way of the Sun
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Jun 21 00:13:36 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 21
    The Sun's path is shown while setting in multiple exposures over three
    separate days. The top path was taken during a summer solstice, the
    middle path during an equinox, and the lower path during a winter
    solstice. The foreground shows grass and some rocks and trees. Please
    see the explanation for more detailed information.

    Three Sun Paths
    Image Credit & Copyright: Marcella Giulia Pace & Giuseppe De Don+

    Explanation: Does the Sun follow the same path every day? No. The Sun's
    path changes during the year, tracing a longer route during the summer
    than the winter. Pictured here, the Sun's arc was captured from noon to
    sunset on three days, from highest in the sky to lowest: summer
    solstice, equinox, and winter solstice. The images were taken near
    Gatto Corvino Village in Sicily, Italy in 2020 and 2021. The path and
    time the Sun spends in the sky is more important in determining the
    season than how close the Earth is to the Sun. In fact, the Earth is
    closest to the Sun in January, during northern winter. Today is a
    solstice, so today the Sun is taking its longest path of the year
    across the sky in Earth's northern hemisphere, but the shortest path in
    the southern hemisphere.

    Tomorrow's picture: open space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Jun 22 00:38:28 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 22

    Stars and Dust across Corona Australis
    Image Credit & Copyright: Alessandro Cipolat Bares

    Explanation: Cosmic dust clouds cross a rich field of stars in this
    telescopic vista near the northern boundary of Corona Australis, the
    Southern Crown. Part of a sprawling molecular cloud complex this star
    forming region is a mere 500 light-years away. That's about one third
    the distance of the more famous stellar nursery known as the Orion
    Nebula. The 2 degree wide frame would span 15 light-years at the
    clouds' estimated distance. Mixed with bright nebulosities the dust
    clouds effectively block light from more distant background stars in
    the Milky Way and obscure from view embedded stars still in the process
    of formation. Large dark nebula Bernes 157 is on the left. To its right
    are a group of pretty reflection nebulae cataloged as NGC 6726, 6727,
    6729, and IC 4812. Their characteristic blue color is produced as light
    from hot stars is reflected by the cosmic dust. The more compact NGC
    6729 surrounds young variable star R Coronae Australis. Just below it,
    filamentary arcs and loops are identified as Herbig Haro objects
    associated with energetic newborn stars. In fact, at the heart of this
    area lies the Coronet Cluster, one of the nearest and most active star
    forming regions.

    Tomorrow's picture: the condor galaxy
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Jun 23 00:15:26 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 23

    Giant Galaxies in Pavo
    Image Credit & Copyright: Mike Selby, Observatorio El Sauce

    Explanation: Over 500,000 light years across, NGC 6872 (top right) is a
    truly enormous barred spiral galaxy, at least 5 times the size of our
    own very large Milky Way. The appearance of this giant galaxy's
    distorted and stretched out spiral arms suggests the magnificent wings
    of a giant bird. Of course its popular moniker is the Condor galaxy. It
    lies about 200 million light-years distant toward the southern
    constellation Pavo, the Peacock. Lined with star-forming regions, the
    distorted spiral arms are due to NGC 6872's gravitational interaction
    with the nearby smaller galaxy IC 4970, seen just above the giant
    galaxy's core. The Pavo galaxy group's dominant giant elliptical
    galaxy, NGC 6876 is below and left of the soaring Condor galaxy.

    Tomorrow's picture: light-weekend
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Jun 24 01:00:42 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 24

    3D Ingenuity
    Image Credit: NASA, JPL-Caltech, MSSS, ASU

    Explanation: The multicolor, stereo imaging Mastcam-Z on the
    Perseverance rover zoomed in to capture this 3D close-up (get out your
    red/blue glasses) of the Mars Ingenuity helicopter on mission sol 45.
    That's Earth-date 2021 April 5. Casting a shadow on the Martian
    surface, Ingenuity is standing alone on its four landing legs next to
    the rover's wheel tracks. The experimental helicopter's solar panel,
    charging batteries that keep it warm through the cold Martian nights
    and power its flight, sits just above Ingenuity's two 1.2 meter (4
    foot) long counter-rotating blades. Thirteen sols later, on April 19,
    Ingenuity became the first aircraft to perform powered, controlled
    flight on another planet. It has since gone on to complete more than 50
    flights through the thin atmosphere of Mars.

    Tomorrow's picture: Jovian lightning
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Jun 25 00:39:52 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 25
    A large swirling cloud on Jupiter is shown with a bright green spot
    near its top. The cloud is surrounded by other less descript parts of
    Jupiter's upper atmosphere. Please see the explanation for more
    detailed information.

    Lightning on Jupiter
    Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS; Processing & License: Kevin
    M. Gill

    Explanation: Does lightning occur only on Earth? No. Spacecraft in our
    Solar System have detected lightning on other planets, including Mars,
    Jupiter and Saturn, and lightning is likely on Venus, Uranus, and
    Neptune. Lightning is a sudden rush of electrically charged particles
    from one location to another. On Earth, drafts of colliding ice and
    water droplets usually create lightning-generating charge separation,
    but what happens on Jupiter? Images and data from NASA's
    Jupiter-orbiting Juno spacecraft bolster previous speculation that
    Jovian lightning is also created in clouds containing water and ice. In
    the featured Juno photograph, an optical flash was captured in a large
    cloud vortex near Jupiter's north pole. During the next few months,
    Juno will perform several close sweeps over Jupiter's night side,
    likely allowing the robotic probe to capture more data and images of
    Jovian lightning.

    Tomorrow's picture: mountains below venus
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Jun 26 13:09:14 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 26
    An orange sky hovers above snow-covered mountains. A blurry line
    divides the orange sky from a darker sky. In the foreground are hills
    and a house. Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    The Belt of Venus over Mount Everest
    Image Credit & Copyright: Soumyadeep Mukherjee

    Explanation: You've surely seen it, but you might not have noticed it.
    During a cloudless twilight, just before sunrise or after sunset, part
    of the atmosphere above the horizon appears slightly dark and
    off-color. Called the Belt of Venus, this transitional band between the
    dark eclipsed sky and the bright day sky can be seen most prominently
    in the direction opposite the Sun. Straight above, blue sky is normal
    sunlight reflecting off the atmosphere, while near the horizon the
    clear sky can appear more orange or red. In the Belt of Venus, the
    atmosphere reflects more light from the setting (or rising) Sun and so
    appears more red. Featured here, the Belt of Venus was photographed
    over several Himalayan mountains including, second from the right,
    Mount Everest, the tallest mountain on Earth. Although usually not
    mentioned, the belt is frequently caught by accident in other
    photographs.

    Tomorrow's picture: ultraviolet red planet
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Jun 27 00:39:28 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 27

    MAVEN's Ultraviolet Mars
    Image Credit: MAVEN, Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics,
    Univ. Colorado, NASA

    Explanation: These two global views of Mars were captured at
    ultraviolet wavelengths, beyond the spectrum visible to human eyes.
    Recorded by the MAVEN spacecraft's Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph
    instrument in July 2022 (left) and January 2023, three otherwise
    invisible ultraviolet bands are mapped into red, green, and blue
    colors. That color scheme presents the Red Planet's surface features in
    shades of tan and green. Haze and clouds appear white or blue, while
    high altitude ozone takes on a dramatic purple hue. On the left, Mars'
    south polar ice cap is in brilliant white at the bottom but shrinking
    during the southern hemisphere's summer season. On the right, the
    northern hemisphere's polar region is seen shrouded in clouds and
    atmospheric ozone. Known to some as the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile
    EvolutioN spacecraft, MAVEN has been exploring Mars' tenuous upper
    atmosphere, ionosphere, and its interactions with the Sun and solar
    wind since 2014.

    Tomorrow's picture: galaxies away
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Jun 28 01:09:46 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 28

    Messier 24: Sagittarius Star Cloud
    Image Credit & Copyright: Emmanuel Astronomono

    Explanation: Unlike most entries in Charles Messier's famous catalog of
    deep sky objects, M24 is not a bright galaxy, star cluster, or nebula.
    It's a gap in nearby, obscuring interstellar dust clouds that allows a
    view of the distant stars in the Sagittarius spiral arm of our Milky
    Way galaxy. Direct your gaze through this gap with binoculars or small
    telescope and you are looking through a window over 300 light-years
    wide at stars some 10,000 light-years or more from Earth. Sometimes
    called the Small Sagittarius Star Cloud, M24's luminous stars fill this
    gorgeous starscape. Covering over 3 degrees or the width of 6 full
    moons in the constellation Sagittarius, the telescopic field of view
    includes dark markings B92 and B93 near center, along with other clouds
    of dust and glowing nebulae toward the center of the Milky Way.

    Tomorrow's picture: pixels in space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Jun 29 02:52:42 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 29
    The illustration shows the beams from pulsars around the image and a
    pair of merging black holes on the upper left. A grid depicting the
    warping of spacetime by passing gravitational waves spreads across the
    image center. Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    A Message from the Gravitational Universe
    Illustration Credit: NANOGrav Physics Frontier Center; Text: Natalia
    Lewandowska (SUNY Oswego)

    Explanation: Monitoring 68 pulsars with very large radio telescopes,
    the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves
    (NANOGrav) has uncovered evidence for the gravitational wave (GW)
    background by carefully measuring slight shifts in the arrival times of
    pulses. These shifts are correlated between different pulsars in a way
    that indicates that they are caused by GWs. This GW background is
    likely due to hundreds of thousands or even millions of supermassive
    black hole binaries. Teams in Europe, Asia and Australia have also
    independently reported their results today. Previously, the LIGO and
    Virgo detectors have detected higher-frequency GWs from the merging of
    individual pairs of massive orbiting objects, such as stellar-mass
    black holes. The featured illustration highlights this
    spacetime-shaking result by depicting two orbiting supermassive black
    holes and several of the pulsars that would appear to have slight
    timing shifts. The imprint these GWs make on spacetime itself is
    illustrated by a distorted grid.

    Open Science: Browse 3,000+ codes in the Astrophysics Source Code
    Library
    Tomorrow's picture: asteroid day
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Jun 30 00:26:14 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 June 30
    A dark background is filled with many light-blue ellipses. Toward the
    center, near circles that are labelled as the orbits of the inner
    planets of our Solar System are drawn. Please see the explanation for
    more detailed information.

    Orbits of Potentially Hazardous Asteroids
    Illustration Credit: NASA, JPL-Caltech

    Explanation: Are asteroids dangerous? Some are, but the likelihood of a
    dangerous asteroid striking the Earth during any given year is low.
    Because some past mass extinction events have been linked to asteroid
    impacts, however, humanity has made it a priority to find and catalog
    those asteroids that may one day affect life on Earth. Pictured here
    are the orbits of the over 1,000 known Potentially Hazardous Asteroids
    (PHAs). These documented tumbling boulders of rock and ice are over 140
    meters across and will pass within 7.5 million kilometers of Earth --
    about 20 times the distance to the Moon. Although none of them will
    strike the Earth in the next 100 years -- not all PHAs have been
    discovered, and past 100 years, many orbits become hard to predict.
    Were an asteroid of this size to impact the Earth, it could raise
    dangerous tsunamis, for example. To investigate Earth-saving
    strategies, NASA successfully tested the Double Asteroid Redirection
    Test (DART) mission last year. Of course, rocks and ice bits of much
    smaller size strike the Earth every day, usually pose no danger, and
    sometimes create memorable fireball and meteor displays.

    Today is: Asteroid Day Tomorrow's picture: three galaxies
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Jul 1 02:16:18 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 1

    Three Galaxies in Draco
    Image Credit & Copyright: David Vernet , Jean-Fran+ois Bax , Serge
    Brunier, OCA/C2PU

    Explanation: This tantalizing trio of galaxies sometimes called the
    Draco Group, is located in the northern constellation of (you guessed
    it) Draco, the Dragon. From left to right are face-on spiral NGC 5985,
    elliptical galaxy NGC 5982, and edge-on spiral NGC 5981, all found
    within this single telescopic field of view that spans a little more
    than the width of the full moon. While the group is far too small to be
    a galaxy cluster, and has not been catalogued as a compact galaxy
    group, the three galaxies all do lie roughly 100 million light-years
    from planet Earth. Not as well known as other tight groupings of
    galaxies, the contrast in visual appearance still makes this triplet an
    attractive subject for astroimagers. On close examination with
    spectrographs, the bright core of striking spiral NGC 5985 shows
    prominent emission in specific wavelengths of light, prompting
    astronomers to classify it as a Seyfert, a type of active galaxy. This
    impressively deep exposure hints at a faint dim halo along with
    sharp-edged shells surrounding elliptical NGC 5982, evidence of past
    galactic mergers. It also reveals many even more distant background
    galaxies.

    Tomorrow's picture: over and under
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Jul 2 00:11:48 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 2
    A long vertical image shows a band of the night sky from horizon at the
    bottom to the opposite horizon -- at the image top. A person stands on
    a snow covered landscape with the central band of the Milky Way running
    between horizons. Each horizon is lit by red, yellow, and green
    auroras. Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    Milky Way and Aurora over Antarctica
    Image Credit & Copyright: LI Hang

    Explanation: It was one of the better skies of this long night. In
    parts of Antarctica, not only is it winter, but the Sun can spend weeks
    below the horizon. At China's Zhongshan Station, people sometimes
    venture out into the cold to photograph a spectacular night sky. The
    featured image from one such outing was taken in mid-July of 2015, just
    before the end of this polar night. Pointing up, the wide angle lens
    captured not only the ground at the bottom, but at the top as well. In
    the foreground, a colleague is taking pictures. In the distance, a
    spherical satellite receiver and several windmills are visible.
    Numerous stars dot the night sky, including Sirius and Canopus. Far in
    the background, stretching overhead from horizon to horizon, is the
    central band of our Milky Way Galaxy. Even further in the distance,
    visible as extended smudges near the top, are the Large and Small
    Magellanic Clouds, satellite galaxies near our huge Milky Way Galaxy.

    Explore the Universe: Random APOD Generator
    Tomorrow's picture: venus beyond blue
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Jul 3 02:08:18 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 3
    Planet Venus is pictured in ultraviolet light. The spherical planet
    appears circular in tan colors with hints of blue. Complex cloud
    patterns are evident. Please see the explanation for more detailed
    information.

    Venus in Ultraviolet from Akatsuki
    Image Credit & Copyright: JAXA, Planet-C Project Team; h/t: Mehmet
    Hakan +zsara+

    Explanation: Why is Venus so different from Earth? To help find out,
    Japan launched the robotic Akatsuki spacecraft which entered orbit
    around Venus late in 2015 after an unplanned five-year adventure around
    the inner Solar System. Even though Akatsuki was past its original
    planned lifetime, the spacecraft and instruments were operating so well
    that much of its original mission was reinstated. Also known as the
    Venus Climate Orbiter, Akatsuki's instruments investigated unknowns
    about Earth's sister planet, including whether volcanoes are still
    active, whether lightning occurs in the dense atmosphere, and why wind
    speeds greatly exceed the planet's rotation speed. In the featured
    image taken by Akatsuki's UVI camera, the day-side of Venus is seen
    shown with planet-scale V-shaped cloud pattern. The image displays
    three ultraviolet colors and indicates a dip in the relative abundance
    of sulfur dioxide shown in faint blue. Analyses of Akatsuki images and
    data has shown, among other discoveries, that Venus has equatorial jet
    similar to Earth's jet stream.

    Tomorrow's picture: sudden sky surprise
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Jul 4 00:13:30 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 4
    Planet Venus is pictured in ultraviolet light. The spherical planet
    appears circular in tan colors with hints of blue. Complex cloud
    patterns are evident. Please see the explanation for more detailed
    information.

    Aurora over Icelandic Waterfall
    Image Credit & Copyright: Cari Letelier

    Explanation: It seemed like the sky exploded. The original idea was to
    photograph an aurora over a waterfall. After waiting for hours under
    opaque clouds, though, hope was running out. Others left. Then,
    unexpectedly, the clouds moved away. Suddenly, particles from a large
    solar magnetic storm were visible impacting the Earth's upper
    atmosphere with full effect. The night sky filled with colors and
    motion in a thrilling auroral display. Struggling to steady the camera
    from high Earthly winds, the 34 exposures that compose the featured
    image were taken. The resulting featured composite image shows the
    photogenic Godafoss (Go+#afoss) waterfall in northern Iceland in front
    of a very active aurora in late February. The solar surface explosion
    that expelled the energetic particles occurred a few days before. Our
    Sun is showing an impressive amount of surface activity as it
    approaches solar maximum, indicating that more impressive auroras are
    likely to appear in Earth's northern and southern sky over the next few
    years.

    Tomorrow's picture: very large map
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Jul 5 01:08:52 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 5
    A map of the observable universe is illustrated in a wedge with the the
    Earth on the bottom and the universe fanning out above. Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    A Map of the Observable Universe
    Image Credit & Copyright: B. M+nard & N. Shtarkman; Data: SDSS, Planck,
    JHU, Sloan, NASA, ESA

    Explanation: What if you could see out to the edge of the observable
    universe? You would see galaxies, galaxies, galaxies, and then, well,
    quasars, which are the bright centers of distant galaxies. To expand
    understanding of the very largest scales that humanity can see, a map
    of the galaxies and quasars found by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey from
    2000 to 2020 -- out to near the edge of the observable universe -- has
    been composed. Featured here, one wedge from this survey encompasses
    about 200,000 galaxies and quasars out beyond a look-back time of 12
    billion years and cosmological redshift 5. Almost every dot in the
    nearby lower part of the illustration represents a galaxy, with redness
    indicating increasing redshift and distance. Similarly, almost every
    dot on the upper part represents a distant quasar, with blue-shaded
    dots being closer than red. Clearly shown among many discoveries,
    gravity between galaxies has caused the nearby universe to condense and
    become increasingly more filamentary than the distant universe.

    More Detailed Maps: Related to Today's APOD
    Tomorrow's picture: open space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Jul 6 01:08:00 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 6

    Fireworks vs Supermoon
    Image Credit & Copyright: Michael Seeley

    Explanation: On July 4, an almost Full Moon rose in planet Earth's
    evening skies. Also known as a Buck Moon, the full lunar phase (full on
    July 3 at 11:39 UTC) was near perigee, the closest point in the Moon's
    almost monthly orbit around planet Earth. That qualified this July's
    Full Moon as a supermoon, the first of four supermoons in 2023. Seen
    from Cocoa Beach along Florida's Space Coast on July 4, any big,
    bright, beautiful Full Moon would still have to compete for attention
    though. July's super-moonrise was captured here against a
    super-colorful fireworks display.

    Tomorrow's picture: pixels in space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Jul 7 01:04:44 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 7

    The Double Cluster in Perseus
    Image Credit & Copyright: M+rten Frosth

    Explanation: This pretty starfield spans about three full moons (1.5
    degrees) across the heroic northern constellation of Perseus. It holds
    the famous pair of open star clusters, h and Chi Persei. Also cataloged
    as NGC 869 (top) and NGC 884, both clusters are about 7,000 light-years
    away and contain stars much younger and hotter than the Sun. Separated
    by only a few hundred light-years, the clusters are both 13 million
    years young based on the ages of their individual stars, evidence that
    they were likely a product of the same star-forming region. Always a
    rewarding sight in binoculars, the Double Cluster is even visible to
    the unaided eye from dark locations.

    Tomorrow's picture: light-weekend
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Jul 8 00:15:56 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 8

    Stickney Crater
    Image Credit: HiRISE, MRO, LPL (U. Arizona), NASA

    Explanation: Stickney Crater, the largest crater on the martian moon
    Phobos, is named for Chloe Angeline Stickney Hall, mathematician and
    wife of astronomer Asaph Hall. Asaph Hall discovered both the Red
    Planet's moons in 1877. Over 9 kilometers across, Stickney is nearly
    half the diameter of Phobos itself, so large that the impact that
    blasted out the crater likely came close to shattering the tiny moon.
    This enhanced-color image of Stickney and surroundings was recorded by
    the HiRISE camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter as it passed
    within some six thousand kilometers of Phobos in March of 2008. Even
    though the surface gravity of asteroid-like Phobos is less than
    1/1000th Earth's gravity, streaks suggest loose material slid down
    inside the crater walls over time. Light bluish regions near the
    crater's rim could indicate a relatively freshly exposed surface. The
    origin of the curious grooves along the surface is mysterious but may
    be related to tidal stresses experienced by close-orbiting Phobos or
    the crater-forming impact itself.

    Tomorrow's picture: doomed star
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Jul 9 00:20:16 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 9
    A Hubble image of the gas and dust surrounding the star Eta Carinae is
    shown. The nebula has two distinct light-colored lobes, surrounded by
    red glowing gas. Please see the explanation for more detailed
    information.

    Doomed Star Eta Carinae
    Image Credit & Copyright: NASA, ESA, Hubble; Processing & License: Judy
    Schmidt

    Explanation: Eta Carinae may be about to explode. But no one knows when
    - it may be next year, it may be one million years from now. Eta
    Carinae's mass - about 100 times greater than our Sun - makes it an
    excellent candidate for a full blown supernova. Historical records do
    show that about 170 years ago Eta Carinae underwent an unusual outburst
    that made it one of the brightest stars in the southern sky. Eta
    Carinae, in the Keyhole Nebula, is the only star currently thought to
    emit natural LASER light. This featured image brings out details in the
    unusual nebula that surrounds this rogue star. Diffraction spikes,
    caused by the telescope, are visible as bright multi-colored streaks
    emanating from Eta Carinae's center. Two distinct lobes of the
    Homunculus Nebula encompass the hot central region, while some strange
    radial streaks are visible in red extending toward the image right. The
    lobes are filled with lanes of gas and dust which absorb the blue and
    ultraviolet light emitted near the center. The streaks, however, remain
    unexplained.

    Tomorrow's picture: stellar pandemonium
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Jul 10 01:19:04 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 10
    A busy star formation region is shown highlighted by red glowing clouds
    and dark ominously-shaped dust. Please see the explanation for more
    detailed information.

    Stars, Dust and Nebula in NGC 6559
    Image Credit & Copyright: Adam Block, Telescope Live

    Explanation: When stars form, pandemonium reigns. A textbook case is
    the star forming region NGC 6559. Visible in the featured image are red
    glowing emission nebulas of hydrogen, blue reflection nebulas of dust,
    dark absorption nebulas of dust, and the stars that formed from them.
    The first massive stars formed from the dense gas will emit energetic
    light and winds that erode, fragment, and sculpt their birthplace. And
    then they explode. The resulting morass can be as beautiful as it is
    complex. After tens of millions of years, the dust boils away, the gas
    gets swept away, and all that is left is a bare open cluster of stars.

    Tomorrow's picture: sun spotted
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Jul 11 00:14:46 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 11
    Our Sun is pictured with hundreds of dark sunspots. The image is
    actually a composite of all of the sunspots visible during the first
    half of this year. Please see the explanation for more detailed
    information.

    Sunspots on an Active Sun
    Image Credit: NASA, SDO; Processing & Copyright: +Penol +Panl-#

    Explanation: Why is our Sun so active now? No one is sure. An increase
    in surface activity was expected because our Sun is approaching solar
    maximum in 2025. However, last month our Sun sprouted more sunspots
    than in any month during the entire previous 11-year solar cycle -- and
    even dating back to 2002. The featured picture is a composite of images
    taken every day from January to June by NASA's Solar Dynamic
    Observatory. Showing a high abundance of sunspots, large individual
    spots can be tracked across the Sun's disk, left to right, over about
    two weeks. As a solar cycle continues, sunspots typically appear closer
    to the equator. Sunspots are just one way that our Sun displays surface
    activity -- another is flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that
    expel particles out into the Solar System. Since these particles can
    affect astronauts and electronics, tracking surface disturbances is of
    more than aesthetic value. Conversely, solar activity can have very
    high aesthetic value -- in the Earth's atmosphere when they trigger
    aurora.

    Tomorrow's picture: star bar with rings
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Jul 12 00:56:20 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 12
    A spiral galaxy is shown with a yellow center, blue rings and spiral
    arms, and dark brown and red dust. The surrounding dark field contains
    both local stars and more distant galaxies. Please see the explanation
    for more detailed information.

    Rings and Bar of Spiral Galaxy NGC 1398
    Image Credit: Mark Hanson; Data: Mike Selby

    Explanation: Why do some spiral galaxies have a ring around the center?
    Spiral galaxy NGC 1398 not only has a ring of pearly stars, gas and
    dust around its center, but a bar of stars and gas across its center,
    and spiral arms that appear like ribbons farther out. The featured deep
    image from Observatorio El Sauce in Chile shows the grand spiral galaxy
    in impressive detail. NGC 1398 lies about 65 million light years
    distant, meaning the light we see today left this galaxy when dinosaurs
    were disappearing from the Earth. The photogenic galaxy is visible with
    a small telescope toward the constellation of the Furnace (Fornax). The
    ring near the center is likely an expanding density wave of star
    formation, caused either by a gravitational encounter with another
    galaxy, or by the galaxy's own gravitational asymmetries.

    Tomorrow's picture: open space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Jul 13 00:32:10 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 13

    Webb's Rho Ophiuchi
    Image Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, Klaus Pontoppidan (STScI),
    Processing: Alyssa Pagan (STScI)

    Explanation: A mere 390 light-years away, Sun-like stars and future
    planetary systems are forming in the Rho Ophiuchi molecular cloud
    complex, the closest star-forming region to our fair planet. The James
    Webb Space Telescope's NIRCam peered into the nearby natal chaos to
    capture this infrared image at an inspiring scale. The spectacular
    cosmic snapshot was released to celebrate the successful first year of
    Webb's exploration of the Universe. The frame spans less than a
    light-year across the Rho Ophiuchi region and contains about 50 young
    stars. Brighter stars clearly sport Webb's characteristic pattern of
    diffraction spikes. Huge jets of shocked molecular hydrogen blasting
    from newborn stars are red in the image, with the large, yellowish
    dusty cavity carved out by the energetic young star near its center.
    Near some stars in the stunning image are shadows cast by their
    protoplanetary disks.

    Tomorrow's picture: pixels in space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Jul 14 01:10:50 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 14

    Comet C/2023 E1 ATLAS near Perihelion
    Image Credit & Copyright: Dan Bartlett

    Explanation: Comet C/2023 E1 (ATLAS) was just spotted in March, another
    comet found by the NASA funded Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert
    System. On July 1 this Comet ATLAS reached perihelion, its closest
    approach to the Sun. Shortly afterwards the telescopic comet was
    captured in this frame sporting a pretty greenish coma and faint,
    narrow ion tail against a background of stars in the far northern
    constellation Ursa Minor. This comet's closest approach to Earth is
    still to come though. On August 18 this visitor to the inner Solar
    System will be a mere 3 light-minutes or so from our fair planet. Based
    on its inclination to the ecliptic plane and orbital period of about 85
    years C/2023 E1 (ATLAS) is considered a Halley-type comet.

    Tomorrow's picture: light-weekend
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Jul 15 00:41:12 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 15

    Webb's First Deep Field
    Image Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, NIRCam

    Explanation: This stunning infrared image was released one year ago as
    the James Webb Space Telescope began its exploration of the cosmos. The
    view of the early Universe toward the southern constellation Volans was
    achieved in 12.5 hours of exposure with Webb's NIRCam instrument. Of
    course the stars with six spikes are well within our own Milky Way.
    Their diffraction pattern is characteristic of Webb's 18 hexagonal
    mirror segments operating together as a single 6.5 meter diameter
    primary mirror. The thousands of galaxies flooding the field of view
    are members of the distant galaxy cluster SMACS0723-73, some 4.6
    billion light-years away. Luminous arcs that seem to infest the deep
    field are even more distant galaxies though. Their images are distorted
    and magnified by the dark matter dominated mass of the galaxy cluster,
    an effect known as gravitational lensing. Analyzing light from two
    separate arcs below the bright spiky star, Webb's NIRISS instrument
    indicates the arcs are both images of the same background galaxy. And
    that galaxy's light took about 9.5 billion years to reach the James
    Webb Space Telescope.

    Tomorrow's picture: view with a thrill
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Jul 16 00:23:28 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 16
    A person is seen facing away, standing on a peak. Other mountain peaks
    surround them. City lights are seen in towns and along roads below.
    Stars in the night sky are above. The band of the Milky Way galaxy
    slants down from the upper left. A bright green meteor streak slants
    down from above. Please see the explanation for more detailed
    information.

    Meteor and Milky Way over the Alps
    Image Credit & Copyright: Nicholas Roemmelt (Venture Photography)

    Explanation: Now this was a view with a thrill. From Mount Tschirgant
    in the Alps, you can see not only nearby towns and distant Tyrolean
    peaks, but also, weather permitting, stars, nebulas, and the band of
    the Milky Way Galaxy. What made the arduous climb worthwhile this
    night, though, was another peak -- the peak of the 2018 Perseids Meteor
    Shower. As hoped, dispersing clouds allowed a picturesque sky-gazing
    session that included many faint meteors, all while a carefully
    positioned camera took a series of exposures. Suddenly, a thrilling
    meteor -- bright and colorful -- slashed down right next to the nearly
    vertical band of the Milky Way. As luck would have it, the camera
    caught it too. Therefore, a new image in the series was quickly taken
    with one of the sky-gazers posing on the nearby peak. Later, all of the
    images were digitally combined.

    Tomorrow's picture: liberating carbon
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Jul 17 01:28:20 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 17
    A star surrounded by orange shells and arcs sit in the center of a dark
    starfield. Galaxies from the distant universe can be seen around the
    edges. Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    Shells and Arcs around Star CW Leonis
    Image Credit: ESA, NASA, Hubble, T. Ueta (U. Denver), H. Kim (KASI)

    Explanation: What's happening around this star? No one is sure. CW
    Leonis is the closest carbon star, a star that appears orange because
    of atmospheric carbon dispersed from interior nuclear fusion. But CW
    Leonis also appears engulfed in a gaseous carbon-rich nebula. What
    causes the nebula's complexity is unknown, but its geometry of shells
    and arcs are surely intriguing. The featured image by the Hubble Space
    Telescope details this complexity. The low surface gravity of carbon
    stars enhances their ability to expel carbon and carbon compounds into
    space. Some of this carbon ends up forming dark dust that is commonly
    seen in the nebulas of young star-forming regions and the disks of
    galaxies. Humans and all Earth-based life are carbon-based, and at
    least some of our carbon was likely once circulating in the atmospheres
    of near-death stars like carbon stars.

    Tomorrow's picture: telescopes and sky
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Jul 18 00:07:14 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 18
    A mountaintop is shown covered by brush. Across the horizon are several
    telescopes. Behind the mountaintop is a deep exposure of the sky
    showing the central band of our Milky Way galaxy and several well-known
    stars and nebulas. Please see the explanation for more detailed
    information.

    Milky Way above La Palma Observatory
    Image Credit & Copyright: Marcin Rosadzi+ski

    Explanation: What's happening in the night sky? To help find out,
    telescopes all over the globe will be pointing into deep space.
    Investigations will include trying to understand the early universe,
    finding and tracking Earth-menacing asteroids, searching for planets
    that might contain extra-terrestrial life, and monitoring stars to help
    better understand our Sun. The featured composite includes foreground
    and background images taken in April from a mountaintop on La Palma
    island in the Canary Islands of Spain. Pictured, several telescopes
    from the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory are shown in front of a
    dark night sky. Telescopes in the foreground include, left to right,
    Magic 1, Galileo, Magic 2, Gran Canarian, and LST. Sky highlights in
    the background include the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy, the
    constellations of Sagittarius, Ophiuchus and Scorpius, the red-glowing
    Eagle and Lagoon Nebulas, and the stars Alrami and Antares. Due to
    observatories like this, humanity has understood more about our night
    sky in the past 100 years than ever before in all of human history.

    Tomorrow's picture: beyond the birds
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Jul 19 00:03:04 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 19
    A rocket is seen after lift-off with a long smoke plume. The rocket is
    captured against a blue sky and has gone through a cloud deck. In the
    foreground is an empty tan-colored field. Please see the explanation
    for more detailed information.

    Chandrayaan-3 Launches to the Moon
    Image Credit & Copyright: Sruthi Suresh (Space Group)

    Explanation: Birds don't fly this high. Airplanes don't go this fast.
    The Statue of Liberty weighs less. No species other than human can even
    comprehend what is going on, nor could any human just a millennium ago.
    The launch of a rocket bound for space is an event that inspires awe
    and challenges description. Pictured here last week, the Indian Space
    Research Organization's LVM3 rocket blasted off from the Satish Dhawan
    Space Centre on Sriharikota Island, India. From a standing start, the
    600,000+ kilogram rocket ship lifted the massive Chandrayaan-3 off the
    Earth. The Chandrayaan-3 mission is scheduled to reach the Moon in late
    August and land a robotic rover near the lunar South Pole. Rockets
    bound for space are now launched from somewhere on Earth every few
    days.

    Tomorrow's picture: open space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Jul 20 00:09:32 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 20

    M64: The Black Eye Galaxy Close Up
    Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble, HLA; Processing: Jonathan Lodge

    Explanation: This magnificent spiral galaxy is Messier 64, often called
    the Black Eye Galaxy or the Sleeping Beauty Galaxy for its dark-lidded
    appearance in telescopic views. The spiral's central region, about
    7,400 light-years across, is pictured in this reprocessed image from
    the Hubble Space Telescope. M64 lies some 17 million light-years
    distant in the otherwise well-groomed northern constellation Coma
    Berenices. The enormous dust clouds partially obscuring M64's central
    region are laced with young, blue star clusters and the reddish glow of
    hydrogen associated with star forming regions. But imposing clouds of
    dust are not this galaxy's only peculiar feature. Observations show
    that M64 is actually composed of two concentric, counter-rotating
    systems. While all the stars in M64 rotate in the same direction as the
    interstellar gas in the galaxy's central region, gas in the outer
    regions, extending to about 40,000 light-years, rotates in the opposite
    direction. The dusty eye and bizarre rotation are likely the result of
    a billion year old merger of two different galaxies.

    Tomorrow's picture: pixels in space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Jul 21 00:08:30 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 21

    Galactic Cirrus: Mandel Wilson 9
    Image Credit & Copyright: Gabriel Rodrigues Santos

    Explanation: The combined light of stars along the Milky Way are
    reflected by these cosmic dust clouds that soar 300 light-years or so
    above the plane of our galaxy. Known to some as integrated flux nebulae
    and commonly found at high galactic latitudes, the dusty galactic
    cirrus clouds are faint. But they can be traced over large regions of
    the sky toward the North and South Galactic poles. Along with the
    reflection of starlight, studies indicate the dust clouds produce a
    faint reddish luminescence as interstellar dust grains convert
    invisible ultraviolet radiation to visible red light. Also capturing
    nearby Milky Way stars and distant background galaxies, this remarkably
    deep, wide-field image explores a complex of faint galactic cirrus
    known as Mandel Wilson 9. It spans over three degrees across planet
    Earth's skies toward the far southern constellation Apus.

    Tomorrow's picture: light-weekend
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Jul 22 04:23:32 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 22

    Apollo 11: Armstrong's Lunar Selfie
    Image Credit: NASA, Apollo 11, Neil Armstrong; Processing: Michael
    Ranger

    Explanation: A photograph of Buzz Aldrin standing on the Moon taken by
    Neil Armstrong, was digitally reversed to create this lunar selfie.
    Captured in July 1969 following the Apollo 11 moon landing, Armstrong's
    original photograph recorded not only the magnificent desolation of an
    unfamiliar world, but Armstrong himself reflected in Aldrin's curved
    visor. In the unwrapped image, the spherical distortion of the
    reflection in Aldrin's helmet has been reversed. The transformed view
    features Armstrong himself from Aldrin's perspective. Since Armstrong
    took the original picture, today the image represents a fifty-four year
    old lunar selfie. Aldrin's visor reflection in the original image
    appears here on the left. Bright (but distorted) planet Earth hangs in
    the lunar sky above Armstrong's figure, toward the upper right. A
    foil-wrapped leg of the Eagle lander and Aldrin's long shadow
    stretching across the lunar surface are prominently visible. In 2024
    NASA's Artemis II mission will return humans to the Moon.

    Tomorrow's picture: unexpected clock
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Jul 22 04:47:26 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 22

    Apollo 11: Armstrong's Lunar Selfie
    Image Credit: NASA, Apollo 11, Neil Armstrong; Processing: Michael
    Ranger

    Explanation: A photograph of Buzz Aldrin standing on the Moon taken by
    Neil Armstrong, was digitally reversed to create this lunar selfie.
    Captured in July 1969 following the Apollo 11 moon landing, Armstrong's
    original photograph recorded not only the magnificent desolation of an
    unfamiliar world, but Armstrong himself reflected in Aldrin's curved
    visor. In the unwrapped image, the spherical distortion of the
    reflection in Aldrin's helmet has been reversed. The transformed view
    features Armstrong himself from Aldrin's perspective. Since Armstrong
    took the original picture, today the image represents a fifty-four year
    old lunar selfie. Aldrin's visor reflection in the original image
    appears here on the left. Bright (but distorted) planet Earth hangs in
    the lunar sky above Armstrong's figure, toward the upper right. A
    foil-wrapped leg of the Eagle lander and Aldrin's long shadow
    stretching across the lunar surface are prominently visible. In 2024
    NASA's Artemis II mission will return humans to the Moon.

    Tomorrow's picture: unexpected clock
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Jul 23 02:34:04 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 23
    An old and corroded mechanism is shown fronted by a large wheel. The
    mechanism has patches of tan and brown color but it is mostly green.
    Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    The Antikythera Mechanism
    Image Credit & License: Marsyas, Wikipedia

    Explanation: It does what? No one knew that 2,000 years ago, the
    technology existed to build such a device. The Antikythera mechanism,
    pictured, is now widely regarded as the first computer. Found at the
    bottom of the sea aboard a decaying Greek ship, its complexity prompted
    decades of study, and even today some of its functions likely remain
    unknown. X-ray images of the device, however, have confirmed that a
    main function of its numerous clock-like wheels and gears is to create
    a portable, hand-cranked, Earth-centered, orrery of the sky, predicting
    future star and planet locations as well as lunar and solar eclipses.
    The corroded core of the Antikythera mechanism's largest gear is
    featured, spanning about 13 centimeters, while the entire mechanism was
    33 centimeters high, making it similar in size to a large book.
    Recently, modern computer modeling of missing components is allowing
    for the creation of a more complete replica of this surprising ancient
    machine.

    Tomorrow's picture: rainbow meteor
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Jul 24 08:42:10 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 24
    A bright colorful streak crossed the image center, which wisps of
    colorful gas extending out. In the background is a dark starfield.
    Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    Chemicals Glow as a Meteor Disintegrates
    Image Credit & Copyright: Michael Kleinburger

    Explanation: Meteors can be colorful. While the human eye usually
    cannot discern many colors, cameras often can. Pictured here is a
    fireball, a disintegrating meteor that was not only one of the
    brightest the photographer has ever seen, but colorful. The meteor was
    captured by chance in mid-July with a camera set up on Hochkar Mountain
    in Austria to photograph the central band of our Milky Way galaxy. The
    radiant grit, likely cast off by a comet or asteroid long ago, had the
    misfortune to enter Earth's atmosphere. Colors in meteors usually
    originate from ionized chemical elements released as the meteor
    disintegrates, with blue-green typically originating from magnesium,
    calcium radiating violet, and nickel glowing green. Red, however,
    typically originates from energized nitrogen and oxygen in the Earth's
    atmosphere. This bright meteoric fireball was gone in a flash -- less
    than a second -- but it left a wind-blown ionization trail that
    remained visible for almost a minute.

    Tomorrow's picture: X-ray eagle
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Jul 25 05:55:12 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 25
    Pillars of gas and dark dust extend diagonally from the bottom left to
    the upper right. Bright X-ray sources are superimposed as bright dots
    around the image. Infrared dust glows behind the pillars. Please see
    the explanation for more detailed information.

    The Eagle Nebula with X-ray Hot Stars
    Image Credit: X-ray: Chandra: NASA/CXC/SAO, XMM: ESA/XMM-Newton; IR:
    JWST: NASA/ESA/CSA/STScI, Spitzer: NASA/JPL/CalTech; Visible: Hubble:
    NASA/ESA/STScI, ESO; Image Processing: L. Frattare, J. Major, N. Wolk,
    and K. Arcand

    Explanation: What do the famous Eagle Nebula star pillars look like in
    X-ray light? To find out, NASA's orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory
    peered in and through these interstellar mountains of star formation.
    It was found that in M16 the dust pillars themselves do not emit many
    X-rays, but a lot of small-but-bright X-ray sources became evident.
    These sources are shown as bright dots on the featured image which is a
    composite of exposures from Chandra (X-rays), XMM (X-rays), JWST
    (infrared), Spitzer (infrared), Hubble (visible), and the VLT
    (visible). What stars produce these X-rays remains a topic of research,
    but some are hypothesized to be hot, recently-formed, low-mass stars,
    while others are thought to be hot, older, high-mass stars. These X-ray
    hot stars are scattered around the frame -- the previously identified
    Evaporating Gaseous Globules (EGGS) seen in visible light are not
    currently hot enough to emit X-rays.

    Tomorrow's picture: undersea overhead
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Jul 26 16:51:38 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 26
    A sprawling nebula is pictured with gold tinted gas covering the top,
    blue, the middle, and dark brown the bottom. Stars cover the frame but
    are most prominent near the bottom. Please see the explanation for more
    detailed information.

    IC 4628: The Prawn Nebula
    Image Credit & Copyright: Daniel Stern

    Explanation: South of Antares, in the tail of the nebula-rich
    constellation Scorpius, lies emission nebula IC 4628. Nearby hot,
    massive stars, millions of years young, irradiate the nebula with
    invisible ultraviolet light, stripping electrons from atoms. The
    electrons eventually recombine with the atoms to produce the visible
    nebular glow, dominated by the red emission of hydrogen. At an
    estimated distance of 6,000 light-years, the region shown is about 250
    light-years across, spanning over three full moons on the sky. The
    nebula is also cataloged as Gum 56 for Australian astronomer Colin
    Stanley Gum, but seafood-loving deep sky-enthusiasts might know this
    cosmic cloud as the Prawn Nebula. The graceful color image is a new
    astronomical composition taken over several nights in April from Rio
    Hurtado, Chile.

    Tomorrow's picture: galaxies in the river
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Jul 27 00:21:16 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 27

    Galaxies in the River
    Image Credit & License: CTIO/NOIRLab/DOE/NSF/AURA; R. Colombari, M.
    Zamani & D. de Martin (NSFCs NOIRLab)

    Explanation: Large galaxies grow by eating small ones. Even our own
    galaxy engages in a sort of galactic cannibalism, absorbing small
    galaxies that are too close and are captured by the Milky Way's
    gravity. In fact, the practice is common in the universe and
    illustrated by this striking pair of interacting galaxies from the
    banks of the southern constellation Eridanus, The River. Located over
    50 million light years away, the large, distorted spiral NGC 1532 is
    seen locked in a gravitational struggle with dwarf galaxy NGC 1531, a
    struggle the smaller galaxy will eventually lose. Seen nearly edge-on,
    spiral NGC 1532 spans about 100,000 light-years. The merging galaxies
    are captured in this sharp image from the Dark Energy Camera mounted on
    the National Science FoundationCs Blanco 4-meter Telescope at Cerro
    Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The NGC 1532/1531 pair is
    thought to be similar to the well-studied system of face-on spiral and
    small companion known as M51.

    Tomorrow's picture: pixels in space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Jul 28 01:49:42 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 28

    Young Stars, Stellar Jets
    Image Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, Processing: Joseph DePasquale (STScI)

    Explanation: High-speed outflows of molecular gas from a pair of
    actively forming young stars shine in infrared light, revealing
    themselves in this NIRcam image from the James Webb Space Telescope.
    Cataloged as HH (Herbig-Haro) 46/47, the young stars are lodged within
    a dark nebula that is largely opaque when viewed in visible light. The
    pair lie at the center of the prominent reddish diffraction spikes in
    the NIRcam image. Their energetic stellar jets extend for nearly a
    light-year, burrowing into the dark interstellar material. A
    tantalizing object to explore with Webb's infrared capabilities, this
    young star system is relatively nearby, located only some 1,140
    light-years distant in the nautical constellation Vela.

    Tomorrow's picture: light-weekend
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Jul 29 01:08:02 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 29

    Apollo 11: Catching Some Sun
    Image Credit: Apollo 11, NASA (Image scanned by Kipp Teague)

    Explanation: Bright sunlight glints as long dark shadows mark this
    image of the surface of the Moon. It was taken fifty-four years ago,
    July 20, 1969, by Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first to walk
    on the lunar surface. Pictured is the mission's lunar module, the
    Eagle, and spacesuited lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin. Aldrin is
    unfurling a long sheet of foil also known as the Solar Wind Composition
    Experiment. Exposed facing the Sun, the foil trapped particles
    streaming outward in the solar wind, catching a sample of material from
    the Sun itself. Along with moon rocks and lunar soil samples, the solar
    wind collector was returned for analysis in earthbound laboratories.

    Tomorrow's picture: Sunday's Childe
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Jul 30 04:24:54 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 30
    A bright green spiral aurora is seen in a break in the clouds before a
    purple background. The foreground contains green grassland and a
    circular lake. Please see the explanation for more detailed
    information.

    Spiral Aurora over Icelandic Divide
    Image Credit & Copyright: Juan Carlos Casado (Starry Earth, TWAN)

    Explanation: Admire the beauty but fear the beast. The beauty is the
    aurora overhead, here taking the form of a great green spiral, seen
    between picturesque clouds with the bright Moon to the side and stars
    in the background. The beast is the wave of charged particles that
    creates the aurora but might, one day, impair civilization. In 1859,
    following notable auroras seen all across the globe, a pulse of charged
    particles from a coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with a solar
    flare impacted Earth's magnetosphere so forcefully that it created the
    Carrington Event. This assault from the Sun compressed the Earth's
    magnetic field so violently that it created high currents and sparks
    along telegraph wires, shocking many telegraph operators. Were a
    Carrington-class event to impact the Earth today, speculation holds
    that damage might occur to global power grids and electronics on a
    scale never yet experienced. The featured aurora was imaged in 2016
    over Thingvallavatn Lake in Iceland, a lake that partly fills a fault
    that divides Earth's large Eurasian and North American tectonic plates.

    Almost Hyperspace: Random APOD Generator
    Tomorrow's picture: moon over mars
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Jul 31 00:43:40 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 July 31
    A dark irregularly-shaped moon is seen in front of the red planet Mars.
    Craters are visible in the foreground and the edge of the planet is
    just visible at the top of the image. Please see the explanation for
    more detailed information.

    Phobos over Mars
    Image Credit: ESA, DLR, FU Berlin, Mars Express; Processing & CC BY 2.0
    License: Andrea Luck

    Explanation: Why is Phobos so dark? Phobos, the largest and innermost
    of the two Martian moons, is the darkest moon in the entire Solar
    System. Its unusual orbit and color indicate that it may be a captured
    asteroid composed of a mixture of ice and dark rock. The featured
    assigned-color picture of Phobos near the edge of Mars was captured in
    late 2021 by ESA's robot spacecraft Mars Express, currently orbiting
    Mars. Phobos is a heavily cratered and barren moon, with its largest
    crater located on the far side. From images like this, Phobos has been
    determined to be covered by perhaps a meter of loose dust. Phobos
    orbits so close to Mars that from some places it would appear to rise
    and set twice a day, while from other places it would not be visible at
    all. Phobos' orbit around Mars is continually decaying -- it will
    likely break up with pieces crashing to the Martian surface in about 50
    million years.

    Your Sky Surprise: What picture did APOD feature on your birthday?
    (post 1995)
    Tomorrow's picture: monster at the Sun's edge
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Aug 1 00:39:02 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 1
    The edge of the Sun is shown sporting a large gaseous prominence that
    looks like a science-fiction alien. Please see the explanation for more
    detailed information.

    Monster Solar Prominence
    Image Credit & Copyright: Mike Wenz

    Explanation: The monsters that live on the Sun are not like us. They
    are larger than the Earth and made of gas hotter than in any teapot.
    They have no eyes, but at times, many tentacles. They float. Usually,
    they slowly change shape and just fade back onto the Sun over about a
    month. Sometimes, though, they suddenly explode and unleash energetic
    particles into the Solar System that can attack the Earth. Pictured is
    a huge solar prominence imaged almost two weeks ago in the light of
    hydrogen. Captured by a small telescope in Gilbert, Arizona, USA, the
    monsteresque plume of gas was held aloft by the ever-present but
    ever-changing magnetic field near the surface of the Sun. Our active
    Sun continues to show an unusually high number of prominences,
    filaments, sunspots, and large active regions as solar maximum
    approaches in 2025.

    Tomorrow's picture: super space wind
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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    NASA Science Activation
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Aug 2 00:25:26 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 2
    The spiral galaxy is shown with many complex red filaments extending
    out. Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    M82: Galaxy with a Supergalactic Wind
    NASA, ESA, Hubble; Processing & Copyright: Harshwardhan Pathak

    Explanation: Why is the Cigar Galaxy billowing red smoke? M82, as this
    starburst galaxy is also known, was stirred up by a recent pass near
    large spiral galaxy M81. This doesn't fully explain the source of the
    red-glowing outwardly expanding gas and dust, however. Evidence
    indicates that this gas and dust is being driven out by the combined
    emerging particle winds of many stars, together creating a galactic
    superwind. The dust particles are thought to originate in M82's
    interstellar medium and are actually similar in size to particles in
    cigar smoke. The featured photographic mosaic highlights a specific
    color of red light strongly emitted by ionized hydrogen gas, showing
    detailed filaments of this gas and dust. The filaments extend for over
    10,000 light years. The 12-million light-year distant Cigar Galaxy is
    the brightest galaxy in the sky in infrared light and can be seen in
    visible light with a small telescope towards the constellation of the
    Great Bear (Ursa Major).

    APOD in world languages: Arabic, Bulgarian, Catalan, Chinese (Beijing),
    Chinese (Taiwan), Croatian, Czech, Dutch, French,
    German, Hebrew, Indonesian, Japanese, Montenegrin, Polish, Russian,
    Serbian, Slovenian, Spanish, Taiwanese, Turkish, and Ukrainian
    Tomorrow's picture: launch and landing
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Aug 3 00:09:58 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 3

    The Falcon and the Redstone
    Image Credit & Copyright: Matt Haskell

    Explanation: In a photo from the early hours of July 29 (UTC), a
    Redstone rocket and Mercury capsule are on display at Cape Canaveral
    Launch Complex 5. Beyond the Redstone, the 8 minute long exposure has
    captured the arcing launch streak of a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket. The
    Falcon's heavy communications satellite payload, at a record setting 9
    metric tons, is bound for geosynchronous orbit some 22,000 miles above
    planet Earth. The historic launch of a Redstone rocket carried
    astronaut Alan Shepard on a suborbital spaceflight in May 1961 to an
    altitude of about 116 miles. Near the top of the frame, this Falcon
    rocket's two reusable side boosters separate and execute brief entry
    burns. They returned to land side by side at Canaveral's Landing Zone 1
    and 2 in the distance.

    Tomorrow's picture: moonrays
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Aug 3 01:36:02 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 3

    The Falcon and the Redstone
    Image Credit & Copyright: Matt Haskell

    Explanation: In a photo from the early hours of July 29 (UTC), a
    Redstone rocket and Mercury capsule are on display at Cape Canaveral
    Launch Complex 5. Beyond the Redstone, the 8 minute long exposure has
    captured the arcing launch streak of a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket. The
    Falcon's heavy communications satellite payload, at a record setting 9
    metric tons, is bound for geosynchronous orbit some 22,000 miles above
    planet Earth. The historic launch of a Redstone rocket carried
    astronaut Alan Shepard on a suborbital spaceflight in May 1961 to an
    altitude of about 116 miles. Near the top of the frame, this Falcon
    rocket's two reusable side boosters separate and execute brief entry
    burns. They returned to land side by side at Canaveral's Landing Zone 1
    and 2 in the distance.

    Tomorrow's picture: moonrays
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Aug 4 01:58:22 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 4

    Moonrays of August
    Image Credit & Copyright: Gianni Tumino

    Explanation: A Full Moon rose as the Sun set on August 1. Near perigee,
    the closest point in its almost moonthly orbit, the brighter than
    average lunar disk illuminated night skies around planet Earth as the
    second supermoon of 2023. Seen here above Ragusa, Sicily, cloud banks
    cast diverging shadows through the supermoonlit skies, creating
    dramatic lunar crepuscular rays. The next Full Moon in 2023 will also
    shine on an August night. Rising as the Sun sets on August 30/31, this
    second Full Moon in a month is known as a Blue Moon. Blue moons occur
    only once every 2 or 3 years because lunar phases take almost a
    calendar month (29.5 days) to go through a complete cycle. But August's
    Blue Moon will also be near perigee, the third supermoon in 2023.

    Tomorrow's picture: a robin's egg
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-6
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Aug 5 08:06:48 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 5

    NGC 1360: The Robin's Egg Nebula
    Image Credit & Copyright: Dong Liang

    Explanation: This pretty nebula lies some 1,500 light-years away, its
    shape and color in this telescopic view reminiscent of a robin's egg.
    The cosmic cloud spans about 3 light-years, nestled securely within the
    boundaries of the southern constellation Fornax. Recognized as a
    planetary nebula, egg-shaped NGC 1360 doesn't represent a beginning
    though. Instead it corresponds to a brief and final phase in the
    evolution of an aging star. In fact, visible at the center of the
    nebula, the central star of NGC 1360 is known to be a binary star
    system likely consisting of two evolved white dwarf stars, less massive
    but much hotter than the Sun. Their intense and otherwise invisible
    ultraviolet radiation has stripped away electrons from the atoms in
    their mutually surrounding gaseous shroud. The predominant blue-green
    hue of NGC 1360 seen here is the strong emission produced as electrons
    recombine with doubly ionized oxygen atoms.

    Tomorrow's picture: supernova remnant
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-6
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Aug 6 02:38:48 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 6
    A thick transparent ribbon of red gas runs from the lower left to the
    upper right. A dark starfield with stars and galaxies surrounds the
    bright red ribbon. Please see the explanation for more detailed
    information.

    SN 1006: A Supernova Ribbon from Hubble
    Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA); Acknowledgement: W.
    Blair et al. (JHU)

    Explanation: What created this unusual space ribbon? The answer: one of
    the most violent explosions ever witnessed by ancient humans. Back in
    the year 1006 AD, light reached Earth from a stellar explosion in the
    constellation of the Wolf (Lupus), creating a "guest star" in the sky
    that appeared brighter than Venus and lasted for over two years. The
    supernova, now cataloged at SN 1006, occurred about 7,000 light years
    away and has left a large remnant that continues to expand and fade
    today. Pictured here is a small part of that expanding supernova
    remnant dominated by a thin and outwardly moving shock front that heats
    and ionizes surrounding ambient gas. The supernova remnant SN 1006 now
    has a diameter of nearly 60 light years.

    Tomorrow's picture: pelican stars
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-6
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Aug 7 00:10:12 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 7
    Mulitple filaments of dark brown run from top to bottom while a bright
    orange dome with small pillars occurs on the bottom right. In the
    background is a blue-glowing gas. Stars dot the frame. Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    The Pelican Nebula in Gas, Dust, and Stars
    Credit & Copyright: Abe Jones

    Explanation: The Pelican Nebula is slowly being transformed. IC 5070
    (the official designation) is divided from the larger North America
    Nebula by a molecular cloud filled with dark dust. The Pelican,
    however, receives much study because it is a particularly active mix of
    star formation and evolving gas clouds. The featured picture was
    produced in three specific colors -- light emitted by sulfur, hydrogen,
    and oxygen -- that can help us to better understand these interactions.
    The light from young energetic stars is slowly transforming the cold
    gas to hot gas, with the advancing boundary between the two, known as
    an ionization front, visible in bright orange on the right.
    Particularly dense tentacles of cold gas remain. Millions of years from
    now, the Pelican nebula, bounded by dark nebula LDN 935, might no
    longer be known as the Pelican, as the balance and placement of stars
    and gas will surely leave something that appears completely different.

    Tomorrow's picture: Jupiter and the Moons
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-6
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Steve Wolf@1:135/210 to Alan Ianson on Mon Aug 7 09:57:04 2023
    Would be nice if we could DL these pics. I don't see the point of just announcing them.

    ... Computers all wait at the same speed!

    --- Mystic BBS v1.12 A49 2023/01/28 (Windows/32)
    * Origin: Black Flag <ACiD Telnet HQ> blackflag.acid.org:23 (1:135/210)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to Steve Wolf on Mon Aug 7 12:21:46 2023
    Would be nice if we could DL these pics. I don't see the point of just announcing them.

    You can download them in many ways. If you run a BBS you can connect the NASA file area and you will get these files shortly after they are hatched.

    Nodes are free to contact me if they need a link to the NASA area and we can do that.

    These files are also avialable on the BBS. The BBS is available at..

    telnet://trmb.ca:2030

    There is also an ITN mailer listening at the above address and you can request any file in the filebase by name.

    Anyone is also free to browse and download files from the BBS FTP site at..

    ftp://trmb.ca

    That's an old style FTP site. Be sure to enter "binary" (without the quotes) from command prompt before downloading binary files like zip files.

    The nasa files are in the fido/nasa directory.

    Aside from that these files are available at any connected BBS and also the NASA website at where these file originate.

    https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-6
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Aug@2:460/256 to Alan Ianson on Mon Aug 7 22:54:47 2023
    Hi Alan...

    Would be nice if we could DL these pics. I don't see the point of just announcing them.
    You can download them in many ways. If you run a BBS you can connect the NASA file area and you will get these files shortly after they are hatched.
    Nodes are free to contact me if they need a link to the NASA area and we can do that.
    These files are also avialable on the BBS. The BBS is available at.. telnet://trmb.ca:2030
    There is also an ITN mailer listening at the above address and you can request any file in the filebase by name.
    Anyone is also free to browse and download files from the BBS FTP site at..
    ftp://trmb.ca
    That's an old style FTP site. Be sure to enter "binary" (without the quotes) from command prompt before downloading binary files like zip files.
    The nasa files are in the fido/nasa directory.
    Aside from that these files are available at any connected BBS and also the NASA website at where these file originate.
    https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/

    Maybe an occasional how-to for fetching copies of images would be good.

    --
    /|ug
    https://t.me/aabolins

    --- Want fido for iOS/MacOS/Android/Win/Linux? https://shrtco.de/tpJ9yV
    * Origin: Fido by Telegram BBS from Stas Mishchenkov (2:460/256)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to Aug on Mon Aug 7 13:34:34 2023
    Maybe an occasional how-to for fetching copies of images would be good.

    Can you give me an example of what a how-to might look like?

    Should that how-to be added to the new file announcement?

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-6
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Aug 8 00:16:52 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 8
    Earth Moon, in crescent phase, is seen just above the image center.
    Directly below is a bright spot surrounded by four other spots, all in
    a row, which are all moons of Jupiter. Please see the explanation for
    more detailed information.

    Moon Meets Jupiter
    Credit & Copyright: Jordi L. Coy

    Explanation: What's that below the Moon? Jupiter -- and its largest
    moons. Many skygazers across planet Earth enjoyed the close conjunction
    of Earth's Moon passing nearly in front of Jupiter in mid-June. The
    featured image is a single exposure of the event taken from Mor+|n de la
    Frontera, Spain. The sunlit lunar crescent on the left is overexposed,
    while the Moon's night side, on the right, is only faintly illuminated
    by Earthshine. Lined up diagonally below the Moon, left to right, are
    Jupiter's bright Galilean satellites: Callisto, Ganymede, Io (hard to
    see as it is very near to Jupiter), and Europa. In fact, Callisto,
    Ganymede, and Io are larger than Earth's Moon, while Europa is only
    slightly smaller. NASA's robotic spacecraft Juno is currently orbiting
    Jupiter and made a close pass near Io only a week ago. If you look up
    in the night sky tonight, you will again see two of the brightest
    objects angularly close together -- because tonight is another
    Moon-Jupiter conjunction.

    Tomorrow's picture: falling space dust
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-6
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From August Abolins@2:221/1.58 to Alan Ianson on Tue Aug 8 21:29:00 2023
    Hello Alan Ianson!

    ** On Monday 07.08.23 - 13:34, Alan Ianson wrote to Aug:

    Maybe an occasional how-to for fetching copies of images would be good.

    Can you give me an example of what a how-to might look like?

    You just want me to do all the work?!? :D

    Actually, what you posted was pretty good, just streamline it
    down to the essentials.


    Should that how-to be added to the new file announcement?

    An occassional post to the echo would be a fine reminder.
    --
    ../|ug

    --- OpenXP 5.0.57
    * Origin: (2:221/1.58)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Aug 9 00:53:08 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 9
    Mulitple streaks cover a night sky filled with stars. An observtory
    dome is visible in the foreground. Please see the explanation for more
    detailed information.

    Meteor Shower: Perseids from Perseus
    Credit & Copyright: Petr Hor+lek / Institute of Physics in Opava

    Explanation: This is a good week to see meteors. Comet dust will rain
    down on planet Earth, streaking through dark skies during peak nights
    of the annual Perseid Meteor Shower. The featured composite image was
    taken during the 2018 Perseids from the Poloniny Dark Sky Park in
    Slovakia. The dome of the observatory in the foreground is on the
    grounds of Kolonica Observatory. Although the comet dust particles
    travel parallel to each other, the resulting shower meteors clearly
    seem to radiate from a single point on the sky in the eponymous
    constellation Perseus. The radiant effect is due to perspective, as the
    parallel tracks appear to converge at a distance, like train tracks.
    The Perseid Meteor Shower is expected to reach its highest peak on
    Saturday after midnight. Since a crescent Moon will rise only very late
    that night, cloudless skies will be darker than usual, making a high
    number of faint meteors potentially visible this year.

    Tomorrow's picture: open space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-6
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Aug 10 00:25:52 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 10

    Five Meters over Mars
    Image Credit: NASA, JPL-Caltech, Ingenuity

    Explanation: On mission sol 872 (Earth date August 3) Ingenuity snapped
    this sharp image on its 54th flight above the surface of the Red
    Planet. During the flight the Mars Helicopter hovered about 5 meters,
    or just over 16 feet, above the Jezero crater floor. Tips of
    Ingenuity's landing legs peek over the left and right edges in the
    camera's field of view. Tracks visible near the upper right corner lead
    to the Perseverance Mars Rover, seen looking on from a distance at the
    top right edge of the frame. Planned as a brief "pop-up" flight,
    Ingenuity's 54th flight lasted less than 25 seconds. It followed
    Ingenuity's 53rd flight made on July 22 that resulted in an unscheduled
    landing.

    Tomorrow's picture: 255 hours
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-6
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Aug 11 00:05:42 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 11

    Messier 51 in 255 Hours
    Image Credit & Copyright: The Deep Sky Collective - Carl Bj++rk,
    Thomas B+hnck, Sebastian Donoso, Jake Gentillon, Antoine and Dalia
    Grelin, Stephen Guberski, Richard Hall,
    Tino Heuberger, Jason Jacks, Paul Kent, Brian Meyers, William Ostling,
    Nicolas Puig, Tim Schaeffer, Felix Sch++fb+nker, Mikhail Vasilev

    Explanation: An intriguing pair of interacting galaxies, M51 is the
    51st entry in Charles Messier's famous catalog. Perhaps the original
    spiral nebula, the large galaxy with whirlpool-like spiral structure
    seen nearly face-on is also cataloged as NGC 5194. Its spiral arms and
    dust lanes sweep in front of a companion galaxy (right), NGC 5195. Some
    31 million light-years distant, within the boundaries of the
    well-trained constellation Canes Venatici, M51 looks faint and fuzzy to
    the eye in direct telescopic views. But this remarkably deep image
    shows off stunning details of the galaxy pair's striking colors and
    extensive tidal debris. A collaboration of astro-imagers using
    telescopes on planet Earth combined over 10 days of exposure time to
    create this definitive galaxy portrait of M51. The image includes 118
    hours of narrowband data that also reveals a vast glowing cloud of
    reddish ionized hydrogen gas discovered in the M51 system.

    Tomorrow's picture: 26 squiggles
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-6
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Aug 12 00:39:12 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 12

    Ghirigori - Star Scribbles
    Image Credit & Copyright: Paolo Palma

    Explanation: It's fun to scribble on the canvas of the sky. You can use
    a creative photographic technique to cause the light of point-like
    stars to dance across a digital image by tapping lightly on the
    telescope while making an exposure. The result will be a squiggly line
    traced by the star (or two squiggles traced by binary stars) that can
    reveal the star's color. Colorful lines, dubbed Ghirigori, made from
    stars found in the northern sky constellations Bootes, Corona Borealis,
    Ophiucus, and Coma Berenices, are captured in this artistic mosaic. The
    25 stars creating the varied and colorful squiggles are identified
    around the border. Of course, temperature determines the color of a
    star. While whitish stars tend to be close to the Sun's temperature,
    stars with bluer hues are hotter, and yellow and red colors are cooler
    than the Sun.

    Weekend Watch: Perseid Meteor Shower
    Tomorrow's picture: a tip of the sombrero
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-6
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Aug 13 00:32:22 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 13
    A red-tinged ring of dust is seen nearly on edge. In the ring's center
    and extending around the frame, blue gas and stars are shown. Please
    see the explanation for more detailed information.

    The Sombrero Galaxy in Infrared
    Credit: R. Kennicutt (Steward Obs.) et al., SSC, JPL, Caltech, NASA

    Explanation: This floating ring is the size of a galaxy. In fact, it is
    a galaxy -- or at least part of one: the photogenic Sombrero Galaxy,
    one of the largest galaxies in the nearby Virgo Cluster of Galaxies.
    The dark band of dust that obscures the mid-section of the Sombrero
    Galaxy in optical light actually glows brightly in infrared light. The
    featured image, digitally sharpened, shows the infrared glow, recently
    recorded by the orbiting Spitzer Space Telescope, superposed in
    false-color on an existing image taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope
    in visible light. The Sombrero Galaxy, also known as M104, spans about
    50,000 light years across and lies 28 million light years away. M104
    can be seen with a small telescope in the direction of the
    constellation Virgo.

    Tomorrow's picture: ring strings
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-6
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Aug 14 01:05:32 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 14
    An oval nebula is seen in false color. The nebula appears blue in the
    center, orange and red around the rim, and orange and purple filaments
    extending to the edge of the frame. Stars are seen throughout the
    frame. Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    The Ring Nebula from Webb
    Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, JWST; Processing: Zi Yang Kong

    Explanation: The Ring Nebula (M57), is more complicated than it appears
    through a small telescope. The easily visible central ring is about one
    light-year across, but this remarkable exposure by the James Webb Space
    Telescope explores this popular nebula with a deep exposure in infrared
    light. Strings of gas, like eyelashes around a cosmic eye, become
    evident around the Ring in this digitally enhanced featured image in
    assigned colors. These long filaments may be caused by shadowing of
    knots of dense gas in the ring from energetic light emitted within. The
    Ring Nebula is an elongated planetary nebula, a type of gas cloud
    created when a Sun-like star evolves to throw off its outer atmosphere
    to become a white dwarf star. The central oval in the Ring Nebula lies
    about 2,500 light-years away toward the musical constellation Lyra.

    Tomorrow's picture: triple iced sky
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-6
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Aug 15 00:22:02 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 15
    A body of water is seen in front of a night sky. The water reflects the
    sky. In the sky, on the right are green aurora. In the center is an
    orange plume. On the right are three while plumes. Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    A Triply Glowing Night Sky over Iceland
    Credit & Copyright: Wioleta Gorecka; Text: Natalia Lewandowska (SUNY
    Oswego)

    Explanation: The Sun is not the quiet place it seems. It expels an
    unsteady stream of energetic electrons and protons known as the solar
    wind. These charged particles deform the Earth's magnetosphere, change
    paths, and collide with atoms in Earth's atmosphere, causing the
    generation of light in auroras like that visible in green in the image
    left. Earth itself is also geologically active and covered with
    volcanoes. For example, Fagradalsfjall volcano in Iceland, seen
    emitting hot gas in orange near the image center. Iceland is one of the
    most geologically active places on Earth. On the far right is the
    Svartsengi geothermal power plant which creates the famous human-made
    Blue Lagoon, shown emitting white gas plumes. The featured composition
    therefore highlights three different sky phenomena, including both
    natural and human-made phenomena.

    Tomorrow's picture: a cosmic embrace
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-6
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Aug 16 00:29:52 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 16

    Arp 93: A Cosmic Embrace
    Image Credit & Copyright: Mike Selby, Observatorio El Sauce

    Explanation: Locked in a cosmic embrace, two large galaxies are merging
    at the center of this sharp telescopic field of view. The interacting
    system cataloged as Arp 93 is some 200 million light-years distant
    toward the constellation Aquarius in planet Earth's sky. Individually
    the galaxies are identified as NGC 7285 (right) and NGC 7284. Their
    bright cores are still separated by about 20,000 light-years or so, but
    a massive tidal stream, a result of their ongoing gravitational
    interaction, extends over 200,000 light-years toward the bottom of the
    frame. Interacting galaxies do look peculiar, but are now understood to
    be common in the Universe. In fact, closer to home, the large spiral
    Andromeda Galaxy is known to be approaching the Milky Way. Arp 93 may
    well present an analog of their distant future cosmic embrace.

    Tomorrow's picture: a cosmic zoo
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-6
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Aug 17 00:14:16 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 17

    A Cosmic Zoo in Cepheus
    Image Credit & Copyright: Yann Sainty

    Explanation: Sprawling emission nebulae IC 1396 and Sh2-129 mix glowing
    interstellar gas and dark dust clouds in this nearly 12 degree wide
    field of view toward the northern constellation Cepheus the King.
    Energized by its central star IC 1396 (left), is hundreds of
    light-years across and some 3,000 light-years distant. The nebula's
    intriguing dark shapes include a winding dark cloud popularly known as
    the Elephant's Trunk below and right of center. Tens of light-years
    long, it holds the raw material for star formation and is known to hide
    protostars within. Located a similar distance from planet Earth, the
    bright knots and swept back ridges of emission of Sh2-129 on the right
    suggest its popular name, the Flying Bat Nebula. Within the Flying Bat,
    the most recently recognized addition to this royal cosmic zoo is the
    faint bluish emission from Ou4, the Giant Squid Nebula. Near the lower
    right edge of the frame, the suggestive dark marking on the sky
    cataloged as Barnard 150 is also known as the dark Seahorse Nebula.

    Notable submissions to APOD: Perseids Meteor Shower 2023
    Tomorrow's picture: northern Pluto
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    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Aug 18 01:16:56 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 18

    Northern Pluto
    Image Credit: NASA, Johns Hopkins Univ./APL, Southwest Research
    Institute

    Explanation: Gaze across the frozen canyons of northern Pluto in this
    contrast enhanced color scene. The image data used to construct it was
    acquired in July 2015 by the New Horizons spacecraft as it made the
    first reconnaissance flight through the remote Pluto system six billion
    kilometers from the Sun. Now known as Lowell Regio, the region was
    named for Percival Lowell, founder of the Lowell Observatory. Also
    famous for his speculation that there were canals on Mars, Lowell
    started the search that ultimately led to Pluto's discovery in 1930 by
    Clyde Tombaugh. In this frame Pluto's North Pole is above and left of
    center. The pale bluish floor of the broad canyon on the left is about
    70 kilometers (45 miles) wide, running vertically toward the south.
    Higher elevations take on a yellowish hue. New Horizon's measurements
    were used to determine that in addition to nitrogen ice, methane ice is
    abundant across Lowell Regio. So far, Pluto is the only Solar System
    world named by an 11-year-old girl.

    Tomorrow's picture: ringed ice giant
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    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Aug 19 00:05:36 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 19

    Ringed Ice Giant Neptune
    Image Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, NIRCam

    Explanation: Ringed ice giant Neptune lies near the center of this
    sharp near-infrared image from the James Webb Space Telescope. The dim
    and distant world is the farthest planet from the Sun, about 30 times
    farther away than planet Earth. But in the stunning Webb view, the
    planet's dark and ghostly appearance is due to atmospheric methane that
    absorbs infrared light. High altitude clouds that reach above most of
    Neptune's absorbing methane easily stand out in the image though.
    Coated with frozen nitrogen, Neptune's largest moon Triton is brighter
    than Neptune in reflected sunlight, seen at the upper left sporting the
    Webb telescope's characteristic diffraction spikes. Including Triton,
    seven of Neptune's 14 known moons can be identified in the field of
    view. Neptune's faint rings are striking in this space-based planetary
    portrait. Details of the complex ring system are seen here for the
    first time since Neptune was visited by the Voyager 2 spacecraft in
    August 1989.

    Tomorrow's picture: long cloud
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Aug 20 01:05:50 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 20
    Building in a city are pictured. Above the buildings appears a long
    dark cylindrical cloud that goes to the horizon. Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    A Roll Cloud Over Wisconsin
    Credit: Megan Hanrahan (Pierre cb), Wikipedia

    Explanation: What kind of cloud is this? A type of arcus cloud called a
    roll cloud. These rare long clouds may form near advancing cold fronts.
    In particular, a downdraft from an advancing storm front can cause
    moist warm air to rise, cool below its dew point, and so form a cloud.
    When this happens uniformly along an extended front, a roll cloud may
    form. Roll clouds may actually have air circulating along the long
    horizontal axis of the cloud. A roll cloud is not thought to be able to
    morph into a tornado. Unlike a similar shelf cloud, a roll cloud is
    completely detached from their parent cumulonimbus cloud. Pictured
    here, a roll cloud extends far into the distance as a storm approaches
    in 2007 in Racine, Wisconsin, USA.

    Tomorrow's picture: comet unknown
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Aug 21 00:05:50 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 21
    A dark starfield is shown with a dim green blur in the middle. Faintly
    extending from the green blur is a tail toward the left. Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    Introducing Comet Nishimura
    Credit & Copyright: Dan Bartlett

    Explanation: Will Comet Nishimura become visible to the unaided eye?
    Given the unpredictability of comets, no one can say for sure, but it
    currently seems like a good bet. The comet was discovered only ten days
    ago by Hideo Nishimura during 30-second exposures with a standard
    digital camera. Since then, C/2023 P1 Nishimura has increased in
    brightness and its path across the inner Solar System determined. As
    the comet dives toward the Sun, it will surely continue to intensify
    and possibly become a naked-eye object in early September. A problem is
    that the comet will also be angularly near the Sun, so it will only be
    possible to see it near sunset or sunrise. The comet will get so close
    to the Sun -- inside the orbit of planet Mercury -- that its nucleus
    may break up. Pictured, Comet Nishimura was imaged three days ago from
    June Lake, California, USA while sporting a green coma and a thin tail.

    Tomorrow's picture: nebula unknown
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Aug 22 00:56:28 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 22
    A diffuse nebula is seen against a dark starfield. The center of the
    nebula is blue and it is surrounded by a red glow. Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    The Pistachio Nebula
    Credit & Copyright: Bray Falls & Chester Hall-Fernandez

    Explanation: This nebula had never been noted before. Newly discovered
    nebulas are usually angularly small and found by professionals using
    large telescopes. In contrast, the Pistachio Nebula was discovered by
    dedicated amateurs and, although faint, is nearly the size of the full
    Moon. In modern times, amateurs with even small telescopes can create
    long exposures over sky areas much larger than most professional
    telescopes can see. They can therefore discover both previously unknown
    areas of extended emission around known objects, as well as entirely
    unknown objects, like nebulas. The pictured Pistachio Nebula is shown
    in oxygen emission (blue) and hydrogen emission (red). The nature of
    the hot central star is currently unknown, and the nebula might be
    labeled a planetary nebula if it turns out to be a white dwarf star.
    The featured image is a composite of over 70 hours of exposure taken in
    early June under the dark skies of Namibia.

    Tomorrow's picture: comet rain
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Aug 23 04:17:14 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 23
    A color meteor streak is seen above the Andromeda spiral galaxy. Please
    see the explanation for more detailed information.

    The Meteor and the Galaxy
    Credit & Copyright: Jose Pedrero

    Explanation: It came from outer space. It -- in this case a sand-sized
    bit of a comet nucleus -- was likely ejected many years ago from
    Sun-orbiting Comet Swift-Tuttle, but then continued to orbit the Sun
    alone. When the Earth crossed through this orbit, the piece of comet
    debris impacted the atmosphere of our fair planet and was seen as a
    meteor. This meteor deteriorated, causing gases to be emitted that
    glowed in colors emitted by its component elements. The featured image
    was taken last week from Castilla La Mancha, Spain, during the peak
    night of the Perseids meteor shower. The picturesque meteor streak
    happened to appear in the only one of 50 frames that also included the
    Andromeda galaxy. Stars dot the frame, each much further away than the
    meteor. Compared to the stars, the Andromeda galaxy (M31) is, again,
    much further away.

    Tomorrow's picture: open space
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Aug 24 00:15:04 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 24

    Meteors along the Milky Way
    Image Credit & Copyright: Ali Hosseini Nezhad

    Explanation: Under dark and mostly moonless night skies, many denizens
    of planet Earth were able to watch this year's Perseid meteor shower.
    Seen from a grassy hillside from Shiraz, Iran these Perseid meteors
    streak along the northern summer Milky Way before dawn on Sunday,
    August 13. Frames used to construct the composited image were captured
    near the active annual meteor shower's peak between 02:00 AM and 04:30
    AM local time. Not in this night skyscape, the shower's radiant in the
    heroic constellation Perseus is far above the camera's field of view.
    But fans of northern summer nights can still spot a familiar asterism.
    Formed by bright stars Deneb, Vega, and Altair, the Summer Triangle
    spans the luminous band of the Milky Way.

    Tomorrow's picture: seasons of Saturn
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    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Aug 25 03:52:50 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 25

    A Season of Saturn
    Image Credit & Copyright: Andy Casely

    Explanation: Ringed planet Saturn will be at its 2023 opposition,
    opposite the Sun in Earth's skies, on August 27. While that puts the
    sixth planet from the Sun at its brightest and well-placed for viewing,
    its beautiful ring system isn't visible to the unaided eye. Still, this
    sequence of telescopic images taken a year apart over the last six
    years follows both Saturn and rings as seen from inner planet Earth.
    The gas giant's ring plane tilts from most open in 2018 to approaching
    edge-on in 2023 (top to bottom). That's summer to nearly the autumn
    equinox for Saturn's northern hemisphere. In the sharp planetary
    portraits, Saturn's northern hexagon and a large storm system are
    clearly visible in 2018. In 2023, ice moon Tethys is transiting,
    casting its shadow across southern hemisphere cloud bands, while
    Saturn's cold blue south pole is emerging from almost a decade of
    winter darkness.

    Tomorrow's picture: phases of Venus
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Aug 26 00:48:32 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 26

    Crescents of Venus
    Image Credit & Copyright: Roberto Ortu

    Explanation: Just as the Moon goes through phases, Venus' visible
    sunlit hemisphere waxes and wanes. This sequence of telescopic images
    illustrates the steady changes for Venus during its recent 2023
    apparition as our evening star. Gliding along its interior orbit
    between Earth and Sun, Venus grows larger during that period because it
    is approaching planet Earth. Its crescent narrows though, as the inner
    planet swings closer to our line-of-sight to the Sun. Closest to the
    Earth-Sun line but passing about 8 degrees south of the Sun, on August
    13 Venus reached its (non-judgmental) inferior conjunction. And now
    Venus shines above the eastern horizon in predawn skies, completing its
    transition to planet Earth's morning star. On August 21, NASA's Parker
    Solar Probe completed its sixth gravity assist flyby of Venus, using
    the encounter to maneuver the probe toward its closest approach yet to
    the Sun.

    Tomorrow's picture: Three Galaxies and a Comet
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Aug 27 01:51:36 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 27
    A rocky landscape is capped by a dark night sky. In the sky, the band
    of our Milky Way Galaxy runs along the right, while two fuzzy patches
    that are the LMC and SMC are visible on the right. Thousands of stars
    are resolved all over the frame. Please see the explanation for more
    detailed information.

    Three Galaxies and a Comet
    Credit & Copyright: Miloslav Druckmuller (Brno University of
    Technology)

    Explanation: Diffuse starlight and dark nebulae along the southern
    Milky Way arc over the horizon and sprawl diagonally through this
    gorgeous nightscape. The breath-taking mosaic spans a wide 100 degrees,
    with the rugged terrain of the Patagonia, Argentina region in the
    foreground. Along with the insider's view of our own galaxy, the image
    features our outside perspective on two irregular satellite galaxies -
    the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. The scene also captures the
    broad tail and bright coma of Comet McNaught, the Great Comet of 2007.

    Tomorrow's picture: game stars
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Aug 28 00:45:30 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 28
    A nebula that appears blue in the middle and is surrounded by
    red-glowing gas is featured. Dramatic lanes of dark dust cut through
    the nebula's left side. A group of stars is visible toward the nebula's
    center. Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    Star Formation in the Pacman Nebula
    Image Credit & Copyright: Craig Stocks

    Explanation: Look through the cosmic cloud cataloged as NGC 281 and you
    might miss the stars of open cluster IC 1590. Formed within the nebula,
    that cluster's young, massive stars ultimately power the pervasive
    nebular glow. The eye-catching shapes looming in the featured portrait
    of NGC 281 are sculpted dusty columns and dense Bok globules seen in
    silhouette, eroded by intense, energetic winds and radiation from the
    hot cluster stars. If they survive long enough, the dusty structures
    could also be sites of future star formation. Playfully called the
    Pacman Nebula because of its overall shape, NGC 281 is about 10,000
    light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia. This sharp composite
    image was made through narrow-band filters. It combines emission from
    the nebula's hydrogen and oxygen atoms to synthesize red, green, and
    blue colors. The scene spans well over 80 light-years at the estimated
    distance of NGC 281.

    Tomorrow's picture: spiral webb
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Aug 29 01:09:28 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 29
    Spiral galaxy M66 is shown in infrared light as seen by the orbiting
    James Webb Space Telescope. A reddish-brown center is seen in the
    galaxy with a blue-colored spiral arms surrounding it. A close
    inspection will reveal that these spiral arms are not symmetrical.
    Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    Unusual Spiral Galaxy M66 from Webb
    Image Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, JWST; Processing: Brian Tomlinson

    Explanation: Why isn't spiral galaxy M66 symmetric? Usually, density
    waves of gas, dust, and newly formed stars circle a spiral galaxy's
    center and create a nearly symmetric galaxy. The differences between
    M66's spiral arms and the apparent displacement of its nucleus are all
    likely caused by previous close interactions and the tidal
    gravitational pulls of nearby galaxy neighbors M65 and NGC 3628. The
    galaxy, featured here in infrared light taken by the James Webb Space
    Telescope, spans about 100,000 light years, lies about 35 million light
    years distant, and is the largest galaxy in a group known as the Leo
    Triplet. Like many spiral galaxies, the long and intricate dust lanes
    of M66 are seen intertwined with the bright stars and intergalactic
    dust that follow the spiral arms.

    Tomorrow's picture: open space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Aug 30 01:10:28 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 30

    Full Moons of August
    Image Credit & Copyright: Gianni Tumino

    Explanation: Near perigee, the closest point in its almost moonthly
    orbit, a Full Moon rose as the Sun set on August 1. Its brighter than
    average lunar disk was captured in this dramatic moonrise sequence over
    dense cloud banks along the eastern horizon from Ragusa, Sicily.
    Illuminating night skies around planet Earth it was the second
    supermoon of 2023. Yet again near perigee, the third supermoon of 2023
    will also shine on an August night. Rising as the Sun sets tonight this
    second Full Moon in August will be known to some as a Blue Moon, even
    though scattered sunlight gives the lunar disk a reddened hue. Defined
    as the second full moon in a calendar month, blue moons occur only once
    every 2 or 3 years. That's because lunar phases take 29.5 days, almost
    a calendar month, to go through a complete cycle. Tonight an August
    Blue Moon will find itself beside bright planet Saturn.

    Tomorrow's picture: the Crew-7 nebula
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    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Aug 31 00:31:00 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 August 31

    The Crew-7 Nebula
    Image Credit & Copyright: Michael Seeley

    Explanation: Not the James Webb Space Telescope's latest view of a
    distant galactic nebula, this illuminated cloud of gas and dust dazzled
    early morning spacecoast skygazers on August 26. The snapshot was taken
    about 2 minutes after the launch of of a Falcon 9 rocket on the SpaceX
    Crew-7 mission, the seventh commercial crew rotation mission for the
    International Space Station. It captures drifting plumes and exhaust
    from the separated first and second stage illuminated against the still
    dark skies. Near the center of the image, within the ragged blueish
    ring, are two bright points of light. The lower one is the second stage
    of the rocket carrying 4 humans to space in a Crew Dragon spacecraft.
    The bright point above is the Falcon 9 first stage booster orienting
    itself for the trip back to Landing Zone-1 at Cape Canaveral, planet
    Earth.

    Tomorrow's picture: a great little patch
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    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Sep 1 00:56:18 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 1

    The Great Globular Cluster in Hercules
    Image Credit & Copyright: Serge Brunier, Jean-Fran+ois Bax, David
    Vernet OCA/C2PU

    Explanation: In 1716, English astronomer Edmond Halley noted, "This is
    but a little Patch, but it shows itself to the naked Eye, when the Sky
    is serene and the Moon absent." Of course, M13 is now less modestly
    recognized as the Great Globular Cluster in Hercules, one of the
    brightest globular star clusters in the northern sky. Sharp telescopic
    views like this one reveal the spectacular cluster's hundreds of
    thousands of stars. At a distance of 25,000 light-years, the cluster
    stars crowd into a region 150 light-years in diameter. Approaching the
    cluster core, upwards of 100 stars could be contained in a cube just 3
    light-years on a side. For comparison, the closest star to the Sun is
    over 4 light-years away. The remarkable range of brightness recorded in
    this image follows stars into the dense cluster core.

    Tomorrow's picture: wisdom in a flower
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Sep 2 01:19:36 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 2

    NGC 7023: The Iris Nebula
    Image Credit & Copyright: Lorand Fenyes

    Explanation: These cosmic clouds have blossomed 1,300 light-years away
    in the fertile starfields of the constellation Cepheus. Called the Iris
    Nebula, NGC 7023 is not the only nebula to evoke the imagery of
    flowers. Still, this deep telescopic image shows off the Iris Nebula's
    range of colors and symmetries embedded in surrounding fields of
    interstellar dust. Within the Iris itself, dusty nebular material
    surrounds a hot, young star. The dominant color of the brighter
    reflection nebula is blue, characteristic of dust grains reflecting
    starlight. Central filaments of the reflection nebula glow with a faint
    reddish photoluminescence as some dust grains effectively convert the
    star's invisible ultraviolet radiation to visible red light. Infrared
    observations indicate that this nebula contains complex carbon
    molecules known as PAHs. The dusty blue petals of the Iris Nebula span
    about six light-years.

    Tomorrow's picture: a cosmic souffle
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Sep 3 00:31:50 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 3
    A fuzzy comet is shown in gray on the upper left against a dark space
    background. The comet's tail extends diagnonally to the lower right.
    The main part of the comet is seen broken up into many trailing pieces.
    Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    Comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 Fragments
    Credit: NASA, ESA, H. Weaver (JHU / APL), M. Mutchler and Z. Levay
    (STScI)

    Explanation: Periodic comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 has broken up at
    least twice. A cosmic souffle of ice and dust left over from the early
    solar system, this comet was first seen to split into several large
    pieces during the close-in part of its orbit in 1995. However, in the
    2006 passage, it disintegrated into dozens of fragments that stretched
    several degrees across the sky. Since comets are relatively fragile,
    stresses from heat, gravity and outgassing, for example, could be
    responsible for their tendency to break up in such a spectacular
    fashion when they near the hot Sun. The Hubble Space Telescope
    recorded, in 2006, the featured sharp view of prolific Fragment B,
    itself trailing a multitude of smaller pieces, each with its own
    cometary coma and tail. The picture spans over 3,000 kilometers at the
    comet's distance of 32 million kilometers from planet Earth.

    Tomorrow's picture: star bursts
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-6
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Sep 4 01:28:38 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 4
    Red glowing gas is seen before a dark starfield. On the upper right is
    a complicated filamentary nebula in blue and red. On the lower left is
    a simple circular nebula in blue. Please see the explanation for more
    detailed information.

    Cygnus: Bubble and Crescent
    Credit & Copyright: Abdullah Al-Harbi

    Explanation: As stars die, they create clouds. Two stellar death clouds
    of gas and dust can be found toward the high-flying constellation of
    the Swan (Cygnus) as they drift through rich star fields in the plane
    of our Milky Way Galaxy. Caught here within the telescopic field of
    view are the Soap Bubble (lower left) and the Crescent Nebula (upper
    right). Both were formed at the final phase in the life of a star. Also
    known as NGC 6888, the Crescent Nebula was shaped as its bright,
    central massive Wolf-Rayet star, WR 136, shed its outer envelope in a
    strong stellar wind. Burning through fuel at a prodigious rate, WR 136
    is near the end of a short life that should finish in a spectacular
    supernova explosion. Discovered in 2013, the Soap Bubble Nebula is
    likely a planetary nebula, the final shroud of a lower mass,
    long-lived, Sun-like star destined to become a slowly cooling white
    dwarf. Both stellar nebulas are about 5,000 light-years distant, with
    the larger Crescent Nebula spanning about 25 light-years across. Within
    a few million years, both will likely have dispersed.

    Your Sky Surprise: What picture did APOD feature on your birthday?
    (post 1995)
    Tomorrow's picture: blue supermoon
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Sep 5 00:46:32 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 5
    A large Moon is seen behind a historic stone structure. Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    Blue Supermoon Beyond Syracuse
    Credit & Copyright: Kevin Saragozza

    Explanation: The last full moon was doubly unusual. First of all, it
    was a blue moon. A modern definition of a blue moon is a second full
    moon to occur during one calendar month. Since there are 13 full moons
    in 2023, one month has to have two -- and that month was August. The
    first full moon was on August 1 and named a Sturgeon Moon. The second
    reason that the last full moon was unusual was because it was a
    supermoon. A modern definition of supermoon is a moon that reaches its
    full phase when it is relatively close to Earth -- and so appears a bit
    larger and brighter than average. Pictured, the blue supermoon of 2023
    was imaged hovering far behind a historic castle and lighthouse in
    Syracuse, Sicily, Italy.

    Gallery: Selected August 2023 supermoon images submitted to APOD
    Tomorrow's picture: sky in motion
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-6
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Sep 6 02:39:32 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 6

    HESS Telescopes Explore the High-Energy Sky
    Credit & Copyright: Video Credit & Copyright: Jeff Dai (TWAN), H.E.S.S.
    Collaboration;
    Music: Ibaotu catalog number 1044988 (Used with permission)

    Explanation: They may look like modern mechanical dinosaurs, but they
    are enormous swiveling eyes that watch the sky. The High Energy
    Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) Observatory is composed of four 12-meter
    reflecting-mirror telescopes surrounding a larger telescope housing a
    28-meter mirror. They are designed to detect strange flickers of blue
    light -- Cherenkov radiation --emitted when charged particles move
    slightly faster than the speed of light in air. This light is emitted
    when a gamma ray from a distant source strikes a molecule in Earth's
    atmosphere and starts a charged-particle shower. H.E.S.S. is sensitive
    to some of the highest energy photons (TeV) crossing the universe.
    Operating since 2003 in Namibia, H.E.S.S. has searched for dark matter
    and has discovered over 50 sources emitting high energy radiation
    including supernova remnants and the centers of galaxies that contain
    supermassive black holes. Pictured in June, H.E.S.S. telescopes swivel
    and stare in time-lapse sequences shot in front of our Milky Way Galaxy
    and the Magellanic Clouds -- as the occasional Earth-orbiting satellite
    zips by.

    Surf the Universe: Random APOD Generator
    Tomorrow's picture: large star cloud
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Sep 7 01:04:32 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 7

    The Large Cloud of Magellan
    Image Credit & Copyright: Chris Willocks

    Explanation: The 16th century Portuguese navigator Ferdinand Magellan
    and his crew had plenty of time to study the southern sky during the
    first circumnavigation of planet Earth. As a result, two fuzzy
    cloud-like objects easily visible to southern hemisphere skygazers are
    known as the Clouds of Magellan, now understood to be satellite
    galaxies of our much larger, spiral Milky Way galaxy. About 160,000
    light-years distant in the constellation Dorado, the Large Magellanic
    Cloud is seen in this sharp galaxy portrait. Spanning about 15,000
    light-years or so, it is the most massive of the Milky Way's satellite
    galaxies and is the home of the closest supernova in modern times, SN
    1987A. The prominent patch above center is 30 Doradus, also known as
    the magnificent Tarantula Nebula, a giant star-forming region about
    1,000 light-years across.

    Tomorrow's picture: large star factory
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Sep 8 01:58:20 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 8

    Star Factory Messier 17
    Image Credit & Copyright: Kim Quick, Terry Hancock, and Tom Masterson
    (Grand Mesa Observatory)

    Explanation: Sculpted by stellar winds and radiation, the star factory
    known as Messier 17 lies some 5,500 light-years away in the nebula-rich
    constellation Sagittarius. At that distance, this 1/3 degree wide field
    of view spans over 30 light-years. The sharp composite, color image
    highlights faint details of the region's gas and dust clouds against a
    backdrop of central Milky Way stars. Stellar winds and energetic light
    from hot, massive stars formed from M17's stock of cosmic gas and dust
    have slowly carved away at the remaining interstellar material,
    producing the cavernous appearance and undulating shapes. M17 is also
    known as the Omega Nebula or the Swan Nebula.

    Tomorrow's picture: large galaxy cloud
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Sep 9 04:10:18 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 9
    A comet is shown with its green coma on the bottom right and a long and
    structured ion tail flowing diagonally across the image toward the top
    left. Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    Comet Nishimura Grows
    Credit & Copyright: Peter Kennett

    Explanation: Comet Nishimura is growing. More precisely, the tails
    C/2023 P1 (Nishimura) are growing as it nears the Sun. Discovered only
    last month, the comet is already near naked eye brightness as it now
    moves inside the Earth's orbit. The comet will be nearest the Earth
    next week, but nearest the Sun the week after -- on September 17.
    Speculation holds that expelled ice and dust from Comet Nishimura's
    last visit to the inner Solar System may have created the Sigma Hydrids
    meteor shower which peaks yearly in December. If so, then this meteor
    shower may become more active, refreshed with new comet debris.
    Pictured, Comet Nishimura was captured from Edgewood, New Mexico, USA
    four nights ago, showing a long ion tail structured by interactions
    with the Sun's wind. Look for this comet near your eastern horizon just
    before sunrise for the next few mornings, but very near your western
    horizon just after sunset next week -- as its coma continues to
    brighten and its tails continue to grow.

    Gallery: Selected Comet Nishimura images submitted to APOD
    Tomorrow's picture: person, moon, sun
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Sep 10 05:24:00 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 10
    A person is seen standing at the top of a ridge. The person appears as
    a silhouette onto the central dark region of an annular solar eclipse.
    The annular solar eclipse is a bright ring with a large dark hole in
    the middle. Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    An Annular Solar Eclipse over New Mexico
    Credit & Copyright: Colleen Pinski

    Explanation: What is this person doing? In 2012, an annular eclipse of
    the Sun was visible over a narrow path that crossed the northern
    Pacific Ocean and several western US states. In an annular solar
    eclipse, the Moon is too far from the Earth to block out the entire
    Sun, leaving the Sun peeking out over the Moon's disk in a ring of
    fire. To capture this unusual solar event, an industrious photographer
    drove from Arizona to New Mexico to find just the right vista. After
    setting up and just as the eclipsed Sun was setting over a ridge about
    0.5 kilometers away, a person unknowingly walked right into the shot.
    Although grateful for the unexpected human element, the photographer
    never learned the identity of the silhouetted interloper. It appears
    likely that the person is holding a circular device that would enable
    them to get their own view of the eclipse. The shot was taken at sunset
    on 2012 May 20 at 7:36 pm local time from a park near Albuquerque. Next
    month, on October 14, a different narrow swath across North and South
    America will be exposed to a different annular solar eclipse, if the
    sky is clear. Simultaneously, cloud-free observers almost anywhere on
    either continent will be able to see a partial solar eclipse.

    Tomorrow's picture: active comet
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Sep 11 02:58:14 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 11
    A scenic and hilly landscape is shown just before sunrise. On the left
    is Comet Nishimura near the horizon with a long tail fading off toward
    the top of the frame. On the right is a bright spot that is Venus. The
    sunrise sky is dark blue at the top but morphs into tan at the horizon,
    while the foreground hills are green. Please see the explanation for
    more detailed information.

    Beautiful Comet Nishimura
    Credit & Copyright: Petr Hor+lek / Institute of Physics in Opava

    Explanation: This scene would be beautiful even without the comet. By
    itself, the sunrise sky is an elegant deep blue on high, with faint
    white stars peeking through, while near the horizon is a pleasing tan.
    By itself, the foreground hills of eastern Slovakia are appealingly
    green, with the Zad+a hura and Ve-'k+ hora hills in the distance, and
    with the lights of small towns along the way. Venus, by itself on the
    right, appears unusually exquisite, surrounded by a colorful
    atmospheric corona. But what attracts the eye most is the comet. On the
    left, in this composite image taken just before dawn yesterday morning,
    is Comet Nishimura. On recent mornings around the globe, its bright
    coma and long ion tail make many a morning panoramic photo unusually
    beautiful. Tomorrow, C/2023 P1 (Nishimura) will pass its nearest to the
    Earth for about the next 434 years.

    Tomorrow's picture: galaxies galore
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-6
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Sep 12 00:54:20 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 12

    Galaxy Cluster Abell 370 and Beyond
    Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Jennifer Lotz and the HFF Team (STScI)

    Explanation: Some 4 billion light-years away, massive galaxy cluster
    Abell 370 is captured in this sharp Hubble Space Telescope snapshot.
    The cluster of galaxies only appears to be dominated by two giant
    elliptical galaxies and infested with faint arcs. In reality, the
    fainter, scattered bluish arcs, along with the dramatic dragon arc
    below and left of center, are images of galaxies that lie far beyond
    Abell 370. About twice as distant, their otherwise undetected light is
    magnified and distorted by the cluster's enormous gravitational mass,
    overwhelmingly dominated by unseen dark matter. Providing a tantalizing
    glimpse of galaxies in the early universe, the effect is known as
    gravitational lensing. A consequence of warped spacetime, lensing was
    predicted by Einstein almost a century ago. Far beyond the spiky
    foreground Milky Way star at lower right, Abell 370 is seen toward the
    constellation Cetus, the Sea Monster. It was the last of six galaxy
    clusters imaged in the Frontier Fields project.

    Tomorrow's picture: partly hidden
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Sep 13 02:15:22 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 13
    A galaxy with blue spiral arms is seen in the image center in the midst
    of numerous foreground stars. This galaxy is surrounded by a white
    envelope, which was found to be hydrogen gas. Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    NGC 4632: Galaxy with a Hidden Polar Ring
    Credit: Jayanne English (U. Manitoba), Nathan Deg (Queen's University)
    & WALLABY Survey, CSIRO/ASKAP, NAOJ/Subaru Telescope; Text: Jayanne
    English (U. Manitoba)

    Explanation: Galaxy NGC 4632 hides a secret from optical telescopes. It
    is surrounded by a ring of cool hydrogen gas orbiting at 90 degrees to
    its spiral disk. Such polar ring galaxies have previously been
    discovered using starlight. However, NGC 4632 is among the first in
    which a radio telescope survey revealed a polar ring. The featured
    composite image combines this gas ring, observed with the highly
    sensitive ASKAP telescope, with optical data from the Subaru telescope.
    Using virtual reality, astronomers separated out the gas in the main
    disk of the galaxy from the ring, and the subtle color gradient traces
    its orbital motion. Why do polar rings exist? They could be material
    pulled from one galaxy as it gravitationally interacts with a
    companion. Or hydrogen gas flows along the filaments of the cosmic web
    and accretes into a ring around a galaxy, some of which gravitationally
    contracts into stars.

    Tomorrow's picture: open space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Sep 14 02:13:22 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 14

    NGC 7331 and Beyond
    Image Credit & Copyright: Ian Gorenstein

    Explanation: Big, beautiful spiral galaxy NGC 7331 is often touted as
    an analog to our own Milky Way. About 50 million light-years distant in
    the northern constellation Pegasus, NGC 7331 was recognized early on as
    a spiral nebula and is actually one of the brighter galaxies not
    included in Charles Messier's famous 18th century catalog. Since the
    galaxy's disk is inclined to our line-of-sight, long telescopic
    exposures often result in images that evokes a strong sense of depth.
    The effect is further enhanced in this sharp image by galaxies that lie
    beyond the gorgeous island universe. The most prominent background
    galaxies are about one tenth the apparent size of NGC 7331 and so lie
    roughly ten times farther away. Their close alignment on the sky with
    NGC 7331 occurs just by chance. Lingering above the plane of the Milky
    Way, this striking visual grouping of galaxies is known to some as the
    Deer Lick Group.

    Tomorrow's picture: good morning moon
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-6
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Sep 15 04:05:34 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 15

    Venus, Moon, and the Smoking Mountain
    Image Credit & Copyright: Luis Miguel Meade Rodr+guez

    Explanation: Venus has returned as a brilliant morning star. From a
    window seat on a flight to Mexico City, the bright celestial beacon was
    captured just before sunrise in this astronomical snapshot, taken on
    September 12. Venus, at the upper right, shared the early predawn skies
    with an old crescent Moon. Seen from this stratospheric perspective,
    both mountain peaks and clouds appear in silhouette along a glowing
    eastern horizon. The dramatic, long, low cloud bank was created by
    venting from planet Earth's active volcano Popocat+petl.

    Tomorrow's picture: Fire over Ice
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

    --- BBBS/Li6 v4.10 Toy-6
    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Sep 16 05:51:14 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 16

    Fireball over Iceland
    Image Credit & Copyright: Jennifer Franklin

    Explanation: On September 12, from a location just south of the Arctic
    Circle, stones of Iceland's modern Arctic Henge point skyward in this
    startling scene. Entertaining an intrepid group of aurora hunters
    during a geomagnetic storm, alluring northern lights dance across the
    darkened sky when a stunning fireball meteor explodes. Awestruck, the
    camera-equipped skygazers captured video and still images of the boreal
    bolide, at its peak about as bright as a full moon. Though quickly
    fading from view, the fireball left a lingering visible trail or
    persistent train. The wraith-like trail was seen for minutes wafting in
    the upper atmosphere at altitudes of 60 to 90 kilometers along with the
    auroral glow.

    Tomorrow's picture: Magnified Moon Mountains
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Sep 18 05:23:20 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 18
    A lone tree is seen on the right of a dark grassy field. Above and on
    the right, a bright red filamentary glow is seen in the sky. The
    filaments of this glow may seem similar to the branches of the tree.
    Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    The Red Sprite and the Tree
    Credit & Copyright: Maxime Villaeys

    Explanation: The sprite and tree could hardly be more different. To
    start, the red sprite is an unusual form of lightning, while the tree
    is a common plant. The sprite is far away -- high in Earth's
    atmosphere, while the tree is nearby -- only about a football field
    away. The sprite is fast -- electrons streaming up and down at near
    light's speed, while the tree is slow -- wood anchored to the ground.
    The sprite is bright -- lighting up the sky, while the tree is dim --
    shining mostly by reflected light. The sprite was fleeting -- lasting
    only a small fraction of a second, while the tree is durable -- living
    now for many years. Both however, when captured together, appear oddly
    similar in this featured composite image captured early this month in
    France as a thunderstorm passed over mountains of the Atlantic
    Pyrenees.

    Your Sky Surprise: What picture did APOD feature on your birthday?
    (post 1995)
    Tomorrow's picture: star jets from webb
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Sep 19 00:48:30 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 19
    Two jets are seen in red and blue moving out from a central object
    shroueded by a diffuse dark brown. The rest of the frame is dark but
    with an few bright stars. Please see the explanation for more detailed
    information.

    HH 211: Jets from a Forming Star
    Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, Webb; Processing: Tom Ray (DIAS Dublin)

    Explanation: Do stars always create jets as they form? No one is sure.
    As a gas cloud gravitationally contracts, it forms a disk that can spin
    too fast to continue contracting into a protostar. Theorists
    hypothesize that this spin can be reduced by expelling jets. This
    speculation coincides with known Herbig-Haro (HH) objects, young
    stellar objects seen to emit jets -- sometimes in spectacular fashion.
    Pictured is Herbig-Haro 211, a young star in formation recently imaged
    by the Webb Space Telescope (JWST) in infrared light and in great
    detail. Along with the two narrow beams of particles, red shock waves
    can be seen as the outflows impact existing interstellar gas. The jets
    of HH 221 will likely change shape as they brighten and fade over the
    next 100,000 years, as research into the details of star formation
    continues.

    Tomorrow's picture: another star's planets
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Sep 20 01:33:50 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 20
    An artist's illustration pictures a cloudy red planet orbiting a
    distant red star. Near the exoplanet is a moon. Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    Methane Discovered on Distant Exoplanet
    Illustration Credit: Ahmad Jabakenji (ASU Lebanon, North Star Space
    Art); Data: NASA, ESA, CSA, JWST

    Explanation: Where else might life exist? One of humanity's great
    outstanding questions, locating planets where extrasolar life might
    survive took a step forward in 2019 with the discovery of a significant
    amount of water vapor in the atmosphere of distant exoplanet K2-18b.
    The planet and its parent star, K2-18, lie about 124 light years away
    toward the constellation of the Lion (Leo). The exoplanet is
    significantly larger and more massive than our Earth, but orbits in the
    habitable zone of its home star. K2-18, although more red than our Sun,
    shines in K2-18b's sky with a brightness similar to the Sun in Earth's
    sky. The 2019 discovery of atmospheric water was made in data from
    three space telescopes: Hubble, Spitzer, and Kepler, by noting the
    absorption of water-vapor colors when the planet moved in front of the
    star. Now in 2023, further observations by the Webb Space Telescope in
    infrared light have uncovered evidence of other life-indicating
    molecules -- including methane. The featured illustration imagines
    exoplanet K2-18b on the far right orbited by a moon (center), which
    together orbit a red dwarf star depicted on the lower left.

    Tomorrow's picture: space tag
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Sep 21 00:11:52 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 21

    Tagging Bennu
    Image Credit: OSIRIS-REx, University of Arizona, NASA, Goddard
    Scientific Visualization Studio

    Explanation: The OSIRIS-REx spacecraft's arm reached out and touched
    asteroid 101955 Bennu on October 20, 2020, after a careful approach to
    the small, near-Earth asteroid's boulder-strewn surface. Dubbed a
    Touch-And-Go (TAG) sampling event, the 30 centimeter wide sampling head
    (TAGSAM) appears to crush some of the rocks in this close-up recorded
    by the spacecraft's SamCam. The image was snapped just after surface
    contact some 321 million kilometers from planet Earth. One second
    later, the spacecraft fired nitrogen gas from a bottle intended to blow
    a substantial amount of Bennu's regolith into the sampling head,
    collecting the loose surface material. And now, nearly three years
    later, on Sunday, September 24, that sample of asteroid Bennu is
    scheduled to arrive on planet Earth. The sample return capsule will be
    dropped off by the OSIRIS-Rex spacecraft as it makes a close flyby of
    Earth. Twenty minutes after the drop-off, the spacecraft will fire its
    thrusters to divert past Earth and continue on to orbit near-Earth
    asteroid 99942 Apophis.

    Tomorrow's picture: reflections of the cosmos
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Sep 22 10:12:00 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 22

    Cosmos in Reflection
    Image Credit & Copyright: Jeff Dai (TWAN)

    Explanation: During the day, over 12,000 large mirrors reflect sunlight
    at the 100-megawatt, molten-salt, solar thermal power plant at the
    western edge of the Gobi desert near Dunhuang, Gansu Province, China.
    Individual mirror panels turn to track the sun like sunflowers. They
    conspire to act as a single super mirror reflecting the sunlight toward
    a fixed position, the power station's central tower. During the night
    the mirrors stand motionless though. They reflect the light of the
    countless distant stars, clusters and nebulae of the Milky Way and
    beyond. This sci-fi night skyscape was created with a camera fixed to a
    tripod near the edge of the giant mirror matrix on September 15. The
    camera's combined sequence of digital exposures captures concentric
    arcs of celestial star trails through the night with star trails in
    surreal mirrored reflection.

    Tomorrow's picture: analog analemma's afternoon
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Sep 23 00:09:08 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 23

    Afternoon Analemma
    Image Credit & Copyright: Ian Griffin (Otago Museum)

    Explanation: An analemma is that figure-8 curve you get when you mark
    the position of the Sun at the same time each day for one year. To make
    this one, a 4x5 pinhole camera was set up looking north in southern New
    Zealand skies. The shutter was briefly opened each clear day in the
    afternoon at 4pm local time exposing the same photosensitized glass
    plate for the year spanning September 23, 2022 to September 19, 2023.
    On two days, the winter and summer solstices, the shutter was opened
    again 15 minutes after the main exposure and remained open until sunset
    to create the sun trails at the bottom and top of the curve. The
    equinox dates correspond to positions in the middle of the curve, not
    the crossover point. Of course, the curve itself is inverted compared
    to an analemma traced from the northern hemisphere. And while fall
    begins today at the Autumnal Equinox for the northern hemisphere, it's
    the Spring Equinox in the south.

    Tomorrow's picture: sunrise solar eclipse
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Sep 24 00:24:32 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 24

    A Ring of Fire Sunrise Solar Eclipse
    Video Credit: Colin Legg & Geoff Sims; Music: Peter Nanasi

    Explanation: What's rising above the horizon behind those clouds? It's
    the Sun. Most sunrises don't look like this, though, because most
    sunrises don't include the Moon. In the early morning of 2013 May 10,
    however, from Western Australia, the Moon was between the Earth and the
    rising Sun. At times, it would be hard for the uninformed to understand
    what was happening. In an annular eclipse, the Moon is too far from the
    Earth to block the entire Sun, and at most leaves a ring of fire where
    sunlight pours out around every edge of the Moon. The featured
    time-lapse video also recorded the eclipse through the high refraction
    of the Earth's atmosphere just above the horizon, making the unusual
    rising Sun and Moon appear also flattened. As the video continues, the
    Sun continues to rise, while the Sun and Moon begin to separate. The
    next annular solar eclipse will occur in less than three weeks. On
    Saturday, October 14, a ring of fire will be visible through clear
    skies from a thin swath crossing both North and South America.

    Tour the Universe: Random APOD Generator
    Tomorrow's picture: big blue bird
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Sep 25 00:25:18 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 25
    A starfield with two bright stars at the top of the frame and two
    galaxies at the bottom. The upper galaxy is a spiral galaxy and has an
    appearance reminiscent of a hummingbird. The lower galaxy is a
    featureless elliptical galaxy. Please see the explanation for more
    detailed information.

    Arp 142: The Hummingbird Galaxy
    Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble, HLA; Processing & Copyright: Basudeb
    Chakrabarti

    Explanation: What's happening to this spiral galaxy? Just a few hundred
    million years ago, NGC 2936, the upper of the two large galaxies shown
    at the bottom, was likely a normal spiral galaxy -- spinning, creating
    stars -- and minding its own business. But then it got too close to the
    massive elliptical galaxy NGC 2937, just below, and took a turn.
    Sometimes dubbed the Hummingbird Galaxy for its iconic shape, NGC 2936
    is not only being deflected but also being distorted by the close
    gravitational interaction. Behind filaments of dark interstellar dust,
    bright blue stars form the nose of the hummingbird, while the center of
    the spiral appears as an eye. Alternatively, the galaxy pair, together
    known as Arp 142, look to some like Porpoise or a penguin protecting an
    egg. The featured re-processed image showing Arp 142 in great detail
    was taken recently by the Hubble Space Telescope. Arp 142 lies about
    300 million light years away toward the constellation of the Water
    Snake (Hydra). In a billion years or so the two galaxies will likely
    merge into one larger galaxy.

    Tomorrow's picture: big blue horse
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Sep 26 01:32:04 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 26
    A starfield surrounds a large nebula that is mostly brown and blue and
    has an appearance reminiscent of the head of a horse. This nebula is
    not the more famous

    IC 4592: The Blue Horsehead Reflection Nebula
    Image Credit & Copyright: Antoine & Dalia Grelin

    Explanation: Do you see the horse's head? What you are seeing is not
    the famous Horsehead nebula toward Orion, but rather a fainter nebula
    that only takes on a familiar form with deeper imaging. The main part
    of the here-imaged molecular cloud complex is reflection nebula IC
    4592. Reflection nebulas are made up of very fine dust that normally
    appears dark but can look quite blue when reflecting the visible light
    of energetic nearby stars. In this case, the source of much of the
    reflected light is a star at the eye of the horse. That star is part of
    Nu Scorpii, one of the brighter star systems toward the constellation
    of the Scorpion (Scorpius). A second reflection nebula dubbed IC 4601
    is visible surrounding two stars above and to the right of the image
    center.

    Tomorrow's picture: open space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Sep 27 01:23:02 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 27
    A rural road is pictured running to the horizon with rural grassy
    fields on both sides. Rising from the lower left is the central band of
    our Milky Way Galaxy. Rising from the horizon -- just at the visible
    end of the road, is a thin twisting band of light twisting green and
    red bands -- a STEVE. The STEVE crosses in front of the Milky Way band
    making a big

    STEVE and Milky Way Cross over Rural Road
    Image Credit & Copyright: Theresa Clarke

    Explanation: Not every road ends in a STEVE. A week ago, a sky
    enthusiast's journey began with a goal: to photograph an aurora over
    Lake Huron. Driving through rural Ontario, Canada, the forecasted sky
    show started unexpectedly early, causing the photographer to stop
    before arriving at the scenic Great Lake. Aurora images were taken
    toward the north -- but over land, not sea. While waiting for a second
    round of auroras, a peculiar band of light was noticed to the west.
    Slowly, the photographer and friends realized that this western band
    was likely an unusual type of aurora: a Strong Thermal Emission
    Velocity Enhancement (STEVE). Moreover, this STEVE was putting on quite
    a show: appearing intertwined with the central band of our Milky Way
    Galaxy while intersecting the horizon just near the end of the country
    road. After capturing this cosmic X on camera, the photographer paused
    to appreciate the unexpected awesomeness of finding extraordinary
    beauty in an ordinary setting.

    Your Sky Surprise: What picture did APOD feature on your birthday?
    (post 1995)
    Tomorrow's picture: open space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Sep 28 00:14:54 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 28

    The Deep Lagoon
    Image Credit & Copyright: Josep Drudis, Christian Sasse

    Explanation: Ridges of glowing interstellar gas and dark dust clouds
    inhabit the turbulent, cosmic depths of the Lagoon Nebula. Also known
    as M8, The bright star forming region is about 5,000 light-years
    distant. It makes for a popular stop on telescopic tours of the
    constellation Sagittarius toward the center of our Milky Way Galaxy.
    Dominated by the telltale red emission of ionized hydrogen atoms
    recombining with stripped electrons, this deep telescopic view of the
    Lagoon's central reaches is about 40 light-years across. The bright
    hourglass shape near the center of the frame is gas ionized and
    sculpted by energetic radiation and extreme stellar winds from a
    massive young star.

    Tomorrow's picture: just back from Bennu
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Sep 29 00:09:04 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 29

    Back from Bennu
    Image Credit: NASA/Keegan Barber

    Explanation: Back from asteroid 101955 Bennu, a 110-pound, 31-inch wide
    sample return capsule rests in a desert on planet Earth in this photo,
    taken at the Department of Defense Utah Test and Training Range near
    Salt Lake City last Sunday, September 24. Dropped off by the OSIRIS-Rex
    spacecraft, the capsule looks charred from the extreme temperatures
    experienced during its blistering descent through Earth's dense
    atmosphere. OSIRIS-Rex began its home-ward journey from Bennu in May of
    2021. Delivered to NASACs Johnson Space Center in Houston on September
    25, the capsule's canister is expected to contain an uncontaminated
    sample of about a half pound (250 grams) of Bennu's loosely packed
    regolith. Working in a new laboratory designed for the OSIRIS-REx
    mission, scientists and engineers will complete the canister
    disassembly process, and plan to unveil the sample of the near-Earth
    asteroid in a broadcast event on October 11.

    Tomorrow's picture: shine on
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Sep 30 01:28:04 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 September 30

    A Harvest Moon over Tuscany
    Image Credit & Copyright: Antonio Tartarini

    Explanation: For northern hemisphere dwellers, September's Full Moon
    was the Harvest Moon. Reflecting warm hues at sunset, it rises behind
    cypress trees huddled on a hill top in Tuscany, Italy in this telephoto
    view from September 28. Famed in festival, story, and song, Harvest
    Moon is just the traditional name of the full moon nearest the autumnal
    equinox. According to lore the name is a fitting one. Despite the
    diminishing daylight hours as the growing season drew to a close,
    farmers could harvest crops by the light of a full moon shining on from
    dusk to dawn. This Harvest Moon was also known to some as a supermoon,
    a term becoming a traditional name for a full moon near perigee. It was
    the fourth and final supermoon for 2023.

    Note: Non-NASA APOD mirror sites will be updated if the US goverment
    shuts down.
    Tomorrow's picture: new moon near apogee
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Oct 1 22:49:20 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 1
    An empty desert is shown with rolling tan sand dunes and a tan glow to
    the air above. A lone tree grows in the image center. High above, the
    Sun glows - but the center of the Sun is blackened out by an unusual
    disk. Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    A Desert Eclipse
    Image Credit & Copyright: Maxime Daviron

    Explanation: A good place to see a ring-of-fire eclipse, it seemed,
    would be from a desert. In a desert, there should be relatively few
    obscuring clouds and trees. Therefore late December of 2019, a group of
    photographers traveled to the United Arab Emirates and Rub al-Khali,
    the largest continuous sand desert in world, to capture clear images of
    an unusual eclipse that would be passing over. A ring-of-fire eclipse
    is an annular eclipse that occurs when the Moon is far enough away on
    its elliptical orbit around the Earth so that it appears too small,
    angularly, to cover the entire Sun. At the maximum of an annular
    eclipse, the edges of the Sun can be seen all around the edges of the
    Moon, so that the Moon appears to be a dark spot that covers most --
    but not all -- of the Sun. This particular eclipse, they knew, would
    peak soon after sunrise. After seeking out such a dry and barren place,
    it turned out that some of the most interesting eclipse images actually
    included a tree in the foreground, because, in addition to the sand
    dunes, the tree gave the surreal background a contrasting sense of
    normalcy, scale, and texture. On Saturday, October 14, a new ring of
    fire will be visible through clear skies from a thin swath crossing
    both North and South America.

    Tomorrow's picture: high sprites
    __________________________________________________________________

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    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Oct 2 00:05:46 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 2
    A normal starry sky is punctuated by by several very unusually shaped
    red objects, known as sprites. These sprites are shown in very high
    details including several very well defined

    Sprite Lightning in High Definition
    Image Credit & Copyright: Nicolas Escurat

    Explanation: Sometimes lightning occurs out near space. One such
    lightning type is red sprite lightning, which has only been
    photographed and studied on Earth over the past 25 years. The origins
    of all types of lightning remain topics for research, and scientists
    are still trying to figure out why red sprite lightning occurs at all.
    Research has shown that following a powerful positive cloud-to-ground
    lightning strike, red sprites may start as 100-meter balls of ionized
    air that shoot down from about 80-km high at 10 percent the speed of
    light. They are quickly followed by a group of upward streaking ionized
    balls. Featured here is an extraordinarily high-resolution image of a
    group of red sprites. This image is a single frame lasting only 1/25th
    of a second from a video taken above Castelnaud Castle in Dordogne,
    France, about three weeks ago. The sprites quickly vanished -- no
    sprites were visible even on the very next video frame.

    Tomorrow's picture: eye in the sky
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Oct 3 00:24:40 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 3
    A vertical planetary nebula is shown in orange around the outside but
    with a blue glow in the center. The outside is shaped like a tilted
    hourglass, while the inside appears similar to an eye. Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    MyCn 18: The Engraved Hourglass Planetary Nebula
    Image Credit & Copyright: NASA, ESA, Hubble, HLA; Processing &
    Copyright: Harshwardhan Pathak

    Explanation: Do you see the hourglass shape -- or does it see you? If
    you can picture it, the rings of MyCn 18 trace the outline of an
    hourglass -- although one with an unusual eye in its center. Either
    way, the sands of time are running out for the central star of this
    hourglass-shaped planetary nebula. With its nuclear fuel exhausted,
    this brief, spectacular, closing phase of a Sun-like star's life occurs
    as its outer layers are ejected - its core becoming a cooling, fading
    white dwarf. In 1995, astronomers used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)
    to make a series of images of planetary nebulae, including the one
    featured here. Pictured, delicate rings of colorful glowing gas
    (nitrogen-red, hydrogen-green, and oxygen-blue) outline the tenuous
    walls of the hourglass. The unprecedented sharpness of the Hubble
    images has revealed surprising details of the nebula ejection process
    that are helping to resolve the outstanding mysteries of the complex
    shapes and symmetries of planetary nebulas like MyCn 18.

    Tomorrow's picture: witch head?
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Oct 4 00:42:36 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 4
    A colorful star field surrounds a big blue reflection nebula. The
    nebula is elongated across the wide frame and said to resemble the head
    of folklore-based witch. Please see the explanation for more detailed
    information.

    IC 2118: The Witch Head Nebula
    Image Credit & Copyright: Abdullah Alharbi

    Explanation: Does this nebula look like the head of a witch? The nebula
    is known popularly as the Witch Head Nebula because, it is said, the
    nebula's shape resembles a Halloween-style caricature of a witch's
    head. Exactly how, though, can be a topic of imaginative speculation.
    What is clear is that IC 2118 is about 50 light-years across and made
    of gas and dust that points to -- because it has been partly eroded by
    -- the nearby star Rigel. One of the brighter stars in the
    constellation Orion, Rigel lies below the bottom of the featured image.
    The blue color of the Witch Head Nebula and is caused not only by
    Rigel's intense blue starlight but because the dust grains scatter blue
    light more efficiently than red. The same physical process causes
    Earth's daytime sky to appear blue, although the scatterers in planet
    Earth's atmosphere are molecules of nitrogen and oxygen.

    Tomorrow's picture: open space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Oct 5 00:12:12 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 05

    Ring of Fire over Monument Valley
    Image Credit & Copyright: Tunc Tezel (TWAN)

    Explanation: Tracking along a narrow path, the shadow of a new moon
    will race across North, Central, and South America, on October 14. When
    viewed from the shadow path the apparent size of the lunar disk will
    not quite completely cover the Sun though. Instead, the moon in
    silhouette will appear during the minutes of totality surrounded by a
    fiery ring, an annular solar eclipse more dramatically known as a ring
    of fire eclipse. This striking time lapse sequence from May of 2012
    illustrates the stages of a ring of fire eclipse. From before eclipse
    start until sunset, they are seen over the iconic buttes of planet
    Earth's Monument Valley. Remarkably, the October 14 ring of fire
    eclipse will also be visible over Monument Valley, beginning after
    sunrise in the eastern sky.

    Tomorrow's picture: 100th anniversary
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Oct 6 00:36:34 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 6

    Edwin Hubble Discovers the Universe
    Image Credit & Copyright: Courtesy Carnegie Institution for Science

    Explanation: How big is our universe? This question, among others, was
    debated by two leading astronomers in 1920 in what has since become
    known as astronomy's Great Debate. Many astronomers then believed that
    our Milky Way Galaxy was the entire universe. Many others, though,
    believed that our galaxy was just one of many. In the Great Debate,
    each argument was detailed, but no consensus was reached. The answer
    came over three years later with the detected variation of single spot
    in the Andromeda Nebula, as shown on the original glass discovery plate
    digitally reproduced here. When Edwin Hubble compared images, he
    noticed that this spot varied, and on October 6, 1923 wrote "VAR!" on
    the plate. The best explanation, Hubble knew, was that this spot was
    the image of a variable star that was very far away. So M31 was really
    the Andromeda Galaxy -- a galaxy possibly similar to our own. Annotated
    100 years ago, the featured image may not be pretty, but the variable
    spot on it opened a window through which humanity gazed knowingly, for
    the first time, into a surprisingly vast cosmos.

    Tomorrow's picture: once and future stars
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Oct 7 00:19:00 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 7
    The featured image shows M31, the Andromeda Galaxy, in both infrared
    light, colored orange, and visible light, colored white and blue.
    Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    The Once and Future Stars of Andromeda
    Image Credit: NASA, NSF, NOAJ, Hubble, Subaru, Mayall, DSS, Spitzer;
    Processing & Copyright: Robert Gendler & Russell Croman

    Explanation: This picture of Andromeda shows not only where stars are
    now, but where stars will be. The big, beautiful Andromeda Galaxy, M31,
    is a spiral galaxy a mere 2.5 million light-years away. Image data from
    space-based and ground-based observatories have been combined here to
    produce this intriguing composite view of Andromeda at wavelengths both
    inside and outside normally visible light. The visible light shows
    where M31's stars are now, highlighted in white and blue hues and
    imaged by the Hubble, Subaru, and Mayall telescopes. The infrared light
    shows where M31's future stars will soon form, highlighted in orange
    hues and imaged by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The infrared light
    tracks enormous lanes of dust, warmed by stars, sweeping along
    Andromeda's spiral arms. This dust is a tracer of the galaxy's vast
    interstellar gas, raw material for future star formation. Of course,
    the new stars will likely form over the next hundred million years or
    so. That's well before Andromeda merges with our Milky Way Galaxy in
    about 5 billion years.

    Tomorrow's picture: in front of the Sun
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Oct 8 00:42:08 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 8
    A partially eclipse Sun is shown. In front of the Sun are sunspots, the
    Moon, clouds, and an airplane. Please see the explanation for more
    detailed information.

    Plane, Clouds, Moon, Spots, Sun
    Image Credit & Copyright: Doyle and Shannon Slifer

    Explanation: What's that in front of the Sun? The closest object is an
    airplane, visible just below the Sun's center and caught purely by
    chance. Next out are numerous clouds in Earth's atmosphere, creating a
    series of darkened horizontal streaks. Farther out is Earth's Moon,
    seen as the large dark circular bite on the upper right. Just above the
    airplane and just below the Sun's surface are sunspots. The main
    sunspot group captured here, AR 2192, was in 2014 one of the largest
    ever recorded and had been crackling and bursting with flares since it
    came around the edge of the Sun a week before. This show of solar
    silhouettes was unfortunately short-lived. Within a few seconds the
    plane flew away. Within a few minutes the clouds drifted off. Within a
    few hours the partial solar eclipse of the Sun by the Moon was over.
    Fortunately, when it comes to the Sun, even unexpected alignments are
    surprisingly frequent. Perhaps one will be imaged this Saturday when a
    new partial solar eclipse will be visible from much of North and South
    America.

    APOD editor to speak: in Houghton, Michigan on Thursday, October 12 at
    6 pm
    Tomorrow's picture: strange sunrise eclipse
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Oct 9 00:17:20 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 9
    A partially eclipse of a Sun rising over water is shown. A ship appears
    on the right. The Sun appears reddened by the Intervening EarthCs
    atmosphere. An inversion layer in the atmosphere makes part of the Sun
    appeared doubled near the horizon. Please see the explanation for more
    detailed information.

    A Distorted Sunrise Eclipse
    Image Credit & Copyright: Elias Chasiotis

    Explanation: Yes, but have you ever seen a sunrise like this? Here,
    after initial cloudiness, the Sun appeared to rise in two pieces and
    during a partial eclipse in 2019, causing the photographer to describe
    it as the most stunning sunrise of his life. The dark circle near the
    top of the atmospherically-reddened Sun is the Moon -- but so is the
    dark peak just below it. This is because along the way, the Earth's
    atmosphere had a layer of unusually warm air over the sea which acted
    like a gigantic lens and created a second image. For a normal sunrise
    or sunset, this rare phenomenon of atmospheric optics is known as the
    Etruscan vase effect. The featured picture was captured in December
    2019 from Al Wakrah, Qatar. Some observers in a narrow band of Earth to
    the east were able to see a full annular solar eclipse -- where the
    Moon appears completely surrounded by the background Sun in a ring of
    fire. The next solar eclipse, also an annular eclipse for well-placed
    observers, will occur this coming Saturday.

    APOD editor to speak: in Houghton, Michigan on Thursday, October 12 at
    6 pm
    Tomorrow's picture: hidden in Orion
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Oct 10 02:07:34 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 10
    The center of the Orion Nebula is seen in infrared light as imaged by
    the James Webb Space Telescope. In the center is the Trapezium Star
    Cluster. The main image is in near infrared light, while the rollover
    image is in mid-infrared light. Please see the explanation for more
    detailed information.

    Hidden Orion from Webb
    Image Credit & License: NASA, ESA, CSA, JWST; Processing: M.
    McCaughrean & S. Pearson

    Explanation: The Great Nebula in Orion has hidden stars. To the unaided
    eye in visible light, it appears as a small fuzzy patch in the
    constellation of Orion. But this image was taken by the Webb Space
    Telescope in a representative-color composite of red and very near
    infrared light. It confirms with impressive detail that the Orion
    Nebula is a busy neighborhood of young stars, hot gas, and dark dust.
    The rollover image shows the same image in representative colors
    further into the near infrared. The power behind much of the Orion
    Nebula (M42) is the Trapezium - a cluster of bright stars near the
    nebula's center. The diffuse and filamentary glow surrounding the
    bright stars is mostly heated interstellar dust. Detailed inspection of
    these images shows an unexpectedly large number of Jupiter-Mass Binary
    Objects (JuMBOs), pairs of Jupiter-mass objects which might give a clue
    to how stars are forming. The whole Orion Nebula cloud complex, which
    includes the Horsehead Nebula, will slowly disperse over the next few
    million years.

    APOD editor to speak: in Houghton, Michigan on Thursday, October 12 at
    6 pm
    Tomorrow's picture: star gone
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Oct 11 05:19:12 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 11
    A nearby spiral galaxy is shown in great details: NGC 1097. However the
    galaxy is imaged twice, once with a supernova spot appearing on a lower
    spiral arm, and once without. The two frames blink back and forth.
    Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    NGC 1097: Spiral Galaxy with Supernova
    Image Data: Telescope Live (Chile); Image Processing & Copyright:
    Bernard Miller

    Explanation: What's happening in the lower arm of this spiral galaxy? A
    supernova. Last month, supernova SN 2023rve was discovered with UAE's
    Al-Khatim Observatory and later found to be consistent with the death
    explosion of a massive star, possibly leaving behind a black hole.
    Spiral galaxy NGC 1097 is a relatively close 45 million light years
    away and visible with a small telescope toward the southern
    constellation of the Furnace (Fornax). The galaxy is notable not only
    for its picturesque spiral arms, but also for faint jets consistent
    with ancient star streams left over from a galactic collision --
    possibly with the small galaxy seen between its arms on the lower left.
    The featured image highlights the new supernova by blinking between two
    exposures taken several months apart. Finding supernovas in nearby
    galaxies can be important in determining the scale and expansion rate
    of our entire universe -- a topic currently of unexpected tension and
    much debate.

    APOD editor to speak: in Houghton, Michigan on Thursday, October 12 at
    6 pm
    Tomorrow's picture: The Garnet Star
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Oct 12 00:22:28 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 12

    Mu Cephei
    Image Credit & Copyright: David Cruz

    Explanation: Mu Cephei is a very large star. An M-class supergiant some
    1500 times the size of the Sun, it is one of the largest stars visible
    to the unaided eye, and even one of the largest in the entire Galaxy.
    If it replaced the Sun in our fair Solar System, Mu Cephei would easily
    engulf Mars and Jupiter. Historically known as Herschel's Garnet Star,
    Mu Cephei is extremely red. Approximately 2800 light-years distant, the
    supergiant is seen near the edge of reddish emission nebula IC 1396
    toward the royal northern constellation Cepheus in this telescopic
    view. Much cooler and hence redder than the Sun, this supergiant's
    light is further reddened by absorption and scattering due to
    intervening dust within the Milky Way. A well-studied variable star
    understood to be in a late phase of stellar evolution, Mu Cephei is a
    massive star too, destined to ultimately explode as a core-collapse
    supernova.

    APOD editor to speak: in Houghton, Michigan tonight, Thursday, October
    12, at 6 pm
    Tomorrow's picture: pixels in space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Oct 13 00:03:04 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 13

    Hydrogen Clouds of M33
    Image Credit & Copyright: Reinhold Wittich

    Explanation: Gorgeous spiral galaxy Messier 33 seems to have more than
    its fair share of glowing hydrogen gas. A prominent member of the local
    group of galaxies, M33 is also known as the Triangulum Galaxy and lies
    a mere 3 million light-years away. The galaxy's central 30,000
    light-years or so are shown in this sharp galaxy portrait. The portrait
    features M33's reddish ionized hydrogen clouds or HII regions.
    Sprawling along loose spiral arms that wind toward the core, M33's
    giant HII regions are some of the largest known stellar nurseries,
    sites of the formation of short-lived but very massive stars. Intense
    ultraviolet radiation from the luminous, massive stars ionizes the
    surrounding hydrogen gas and ultimately produces the characteristic red
    glow. In this image, broadband data were combined with narrowband data
    recorded through a hydrogen-alpha filter. That filter transmits the
    light of the strongest visible hydrogen emission line.

    Tomorrow's picture: ring around the Sun
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Oct 14 01:48:10 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 14

    Circular Sun Halo
    Image Credit & Copyright: Vincenzo Mirabella

    Explanation: Want to see a ring around the Sun? It's easy to do in
    daytime skies around the world. Created by randomly oriented ice
    crystals in thin high cirrus clouds, circular 22 degree halos are
    visible much more often than rainbows. This one was captured by smart
    phone photography on May 29, 2021 near Rome, Italy. Carefully blocking
    the Sun, for example with a finger tip, is usually all that it takes to
    reveal the common bright halo ring. The halo's characteristic angular
    radius is about equal to the span of your hand, thumb to little finger,
    at the end of your outstretched arm. Want to see a ring of fire
    eclipse? That's harder. The spectacular annular phase of today's
    (October 14) solar eclipse, known as a ring of fire, is briefly visible
    only when standing along the Moon's narrow shadow track that passes
    over limited parts of North, Central, and South America. The solar
    eclipse is partial though, when seen from broader regions throughout
    the Americas.

    Tomorrow's picture: Sun Day
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Oct 15 00:53:24 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 15
    A driveway is shown with a car at the top of the frame but a series of
    shadows across the rest of the frame. A close inspection of these
    shadows shows that they are frequently small images of an ongoing
    partial solar eclipse. Please see the explanation for more detailed
    information.

    An Eclipse Tree
    Image Credit & Copyright: Shawn Wyre

    Explanation: Yes, but can your tree do this? If you look closely at the
    ground in the featured image, you will see many images of yesterday's
    solar eclipse -- created by a tree. Gaps between tree leaves act like
    pinhole lenses and each create a small image of the partially eclipsed
    Sun visible in the other direction. The image was taken in Burleson,
    Texas, USA. Yesterday, people across the Americas were treated to a
    partial eclipse of the Sun, when the Moon moves in front of part of the
    Sun. People in a narrow band of Earth were treated to an annular
    eclipse, also called a ring-of-fire eclipse, when the Moon becomes
    completely engulfed by the Sun and sunlight streams around all of the
    Moon's edges. In answer to the lede question, your tree not only can do
    this, but will do it every time that a visible solar eclipse passes
    overhead. Next April 8, a deeper, total solar eclipse will move across
    North America.

    Album: Selected eclipse images sent in to APOD
    Tomorrow's picture: eclipse sky
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Oct 16 00:54:50 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 16
    An annular solar eclipse appears in the background with the dark Moon
    appearing completely internal to the bright Sun. In the foreground is a
    ridge with the silhouettes of two people, one standing, and one
    kneeling. Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    Eclipse Rings
    Image Credit & Copyright: Jerry Zhang (left), Baolong Chen
    (photographer) & Amber Zhang (right)

    Explanation: She knew everything but the question. She was well aware
    that there would be a complete annular eclipse of the Sun visible from
    their driving destination: Lake Abert in Oregon. She knew that the next
    ring-of-fire eclipse would occur in the USA only in 16 more years,
    making this a rare photographic opportunity. She was comfortable with
    the plan: that she and her boyfriend would appear in front of the
    eclipse in silhouette, sometimes alone, and sometimes together. She
    knew that the annular phase of this eclipse would last only a few
    minutes and she helped in the many hours of planning. She could see
    their friend who set up the camera about 400 meters away at the bottom
    of a ridge. What she didn't know was the question she would be asked.
    But she did know the answer: "yes".

    Album: Selected eclipse images sent in to APOD
    Tomorrow's picture: dust rings
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Oct 17 01:22:46 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 17
    An orange elliptical ring is shown that is a disk of gas and dust
    around the star PDS 70. In the center of the disk is a fuzzy spot and
    near the inner right edge of the disk is another fuzzy spot. Please see
    the explanation for more detailed information.

    PDS 70: Disk, Planets, and Moons
    Image Credit: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO); M. Benisty et al.

    Explanation: It's not the big ring that's attracting the most
    attention. Although the big planet-forming ring around the star PDS 70
    is clearly imaged and itself quite interesting. It's also not the
    planet on the right, just inside the big disk, thatCs being talked
    about the most. Although the planet PDS 70c is a newly formed and,
    interestingly, similar in size and mass to Jupiter. It's the fuzzy
    patch around the planet PDS 70c that's causing the commotion. That
    fuzzy patch is thought to be a dusty disk that is now forming into
    moons -- and that had never been seen before. The featured image was
    taken in 2021 by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) of 66 radio
    telescopes in the high Atacama Desert of northern Chile. Based on ALMA
    data, astronomers infer that the moon-forming exoplanetary disk has a
    radius similar to our Earth's orbit, and may one day form three or so
    Luna-sized moons -- not very different from our Jupiter's four.

    Tomorrow's picture: veiled supernova
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Oct 18 01:01:02 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 18
    Brown glowing dust appears to the left of the blue and red filamentary
    gas that composes the western edge of the Veil Nebula, a supernova
    remnant. Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    Dust and the Western Veil Nebula
    Image Credit & Copyright: Jiang Wu

    Explanation: It's so big it is easy to miss. The entire Veil Nebula
    spans six times the diameter of the full moon, but is so dim you need
    binoculars to see it. The nebula was created about 15,000 years ago
    when a star in the constellation of the Swan (Cygnus) exploded. The
    spectacular explosion would have appeared brighter than even Venus for
    a week - but there is no known record of it. Pictured is the western
    edge of the still-expanding gas cloud. Notable gas filaments include
    the Witch's Broom Nebula on the upper left near the bright foreground
    star 52 Cygni, and Fleming's Triangular Wisp (formerly known as
    Pickering's Triangle) running diagonally up the image middle. What is
    rarely imaged -- but seen in the featured long exposure across many
    color bands -- is the reflecting brown dust that runs vertically up the
    image left, dust likely created in the cool atmospheres of massive
    stars.

    Tomorrow's picture: open space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Oct 19 00:05:00 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 19

    A Sunrise at Sunset Point
    Image Credit & Copyright: Martin Ratcliffe

    Explanation: This timelapse series captured on October 14 is set
    against the sunrise view from Sunset Point, Bryce Canyon, planet Earth.
    Of course on that date the New Moon caught up with the Sun in the
    canyon's morning skies. Local temperatures fell as the Moon's shadow
    swept across the high altitude scene and the brilliant morning sunlight
    became a more subdued yellow hue cast over the reddish rocky landscape.
    In the timelapse series, images were taken at 2 minute intervals. The
    camera and solar filter were fixed to a tripod to follow the phases of
    the annular solar eclipse.

    APOD Album: Annular Solar Eclipse of 2023 October
    Tomorrow's picture: a comet and a galaxy
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Oct 20 00:11:38 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 20

    Galaxies and a Comet
    Image Credit & Copyright: Dan Bartlett

    Explanation: Galaxies abound in this sharp telescopic image recorded on
    October 12 in dark skies over June Lake, California. The celestial
    scene spans nearly 2 degrees within the boundaries of the well-trained
    northern constellation Canes Venatici. Prominent at the upper left 23.5
    million light-years distant is big, beautiful spiral galaxy NGC 4258,
    known to some as Messier 106. Eye-catching edge-on spiral NGC 4217 is
    above and right of center about 60 million light-years away. Just
    passing through the pretty field of view is comet C/2023 H2 Lemmon,
    discovered last April in image data from the Mount Lemmon Survey. Here
    the comet sports more of a lime green coma though, along with a faint,
    narrow ion tail stretching toward the top of the frame. This visitor to
    the inner Solar System is presently less than 7 light-minutes away and
    still difficult to spot with binoculars, but it's growing brighter.
    Comet C/2023 H2 Lemmon will reach perihelion, its closest point to the
    Sun, on October 29 and perigee, its closest to our fair planet, on
    November 10 as it transitions from morning to evening northern skies.

    Tomorrow's picture: observe the Moon
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Oct 21 00:08:34 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 21

    Quarter Moons
    Image Credit & Copyright: Marcella Giulia Pace

    Explanation: Half way between New Moon and Full Moon is the Moon's
    first quarter phase. That's a quarter of the way around its moonthly
    orbit. At the first quarter phase, half the Moon's visible side is
    illuminated by sunlight. For the Moon's third quarter phase, half way
    between Full Moon and New Moon, sunlight illuminates the other half of
    the visible lunar disk. At both first and third quarter phases, the
    terminator, or shadow line separating the lunar night and day, runs
    down the middle. Near the terminator, long shadows bring lunar craters
    and mountains in to sharp relief, making the quarter phases a good time
    to observe the Moon. But in case you missed some, all the quarter
    phases of the Moon and their calendar dates during 2022 can be found in
    this well-planned array of telephoto images. Of course, you can observe
    a first quarter Moon tonight.

    International: Observe the Moon Night
    Tomorrow's picture: ghostly northern lights
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Oct 22 00:26:00 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 22
    A landscape is pictured with snow and a line of evergreen trees. In the
    sky is a field of stars but also notable green aurora. The largest
    aurora appears similar in form to a Halloween ghost, Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    Ghost Aurora over Canada
    Image Credit & Copyright: Yuichi Takasaka, TWAN

    Explanation: What does this aurora look like to you? While braving the
    cold to watch the skies above northern Canada early one morning in
    2013, a most unusual aurora appeared. The aurora definitely appeared to
    be shaped like something, but what? Two ghostly possibilities recorded
    by the astrophotographer were "witch" and "goddess of dawn", but please
    feel free to suggest your own Halloween-enhanced impressions.
    Regardless of fantastical pareidolic interpretations, the pictured
    aurora had a typical green color and was surely caused by the
    scientifically commonplace action of high-energy particles from space
    interacting with oxygen in Earth's upper atmosphere. In the image
    foreground, at the bottom, is a frozen Alexandra Falls, while evergreen
    trees cross the middle.

    Help Wanted: Professional-astronomer level guest writers and assistant
    editors for APOD
    Tomorrow's picture: Io from Juno
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Oct 23 00:29:52 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 23
    Jupiter's moon Io is shown as photogaphred recently by NASA's passing
    Juno spacecraft. The moon is nearly half- lit by the distant Sun and
    shows a complex surface including the colors yellow, orange, and dark
    brown. Near the top, the plume of an active volcano can be seen. Please
    see the explanation for more detailed information.

    Moon Io from Spacecraft Juno
    Image Credit: NASA, JPL-Caltech, SwRI, MSSS; Processing & Copyright:
    Ted Stryk & Fernando Garc+a Navarro

    Explanation: There goes another one! Volcanoes on Jupiter's moon Io
    keep erupting. To investigate, NASA's robotic Juno spacecraft has begun
    a series of visits to this very strange moon. Io is about the size of
    Earth's moon, but because of gravitational flexing by Jupiter and other
    moons, Io's interior gets heated and its surface has become covered
    with volcanoes. The featured image is from last week's flyby, passing
    within 12,000 kilometers above the dangerously active world. The
    surface of Io is covered with sulfur and frozen sulfur dioxide, making
    it appear yellow, orange and brown. As hoped, Juno flew by just as a
    volcano was erupting -- with its faint plume visible near the top of
    the featured image. Studying Io's volcanoes and plumes helps humanity
    better understand how Jupiter's complex system of moons, rings, and
    auroras interact. Juno is scheduled to make two flybys of Io during the
    coming months that are almost 10 times closer: one in December and
    another in February 2024.

    Help Wanted: Professional-astronomer level guest writers and assistant
    editors for APOD
    Tomorrow's picture: eclipse sky
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Oct 24 00:06:50 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 24
    Three large galaxies are shown, the rightmost two in collision. The
    galaxy on the far right is a large spiral galaxy with one arm connected
    to an unusual polar galaxy on the left. The smaller galaxy on the far
    left is thought to be far in the background. Please see the explanation
    for more detailed information.

    Arp 87: Merging Galaxies from Hubble
    Image Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble; Processing: Harshwardhan Pathak

    Explanation: This dance is to the death. As these two large galaxies
    duel, a cosmic bridge of stars, gas, and dust currently stretches over
    75,000 light-years and joins them. The bridge itself is strong evidence
    that these two immense star systems have passed close to each other and
    experienced violent tides induced by mutual gravity. As further
    evidence, the face-on spiral galaxy on the right, also known as NGC
    3808A, exhibits many young blue star clusters produced in a burst of
    star formation. The twisted edge-on spiral on the left (NGC 3808B)
    seems to be wrapped in the material bridging the galaxies and
    surrounded by a curious polar ring. Together, the system is known as
    Arp 87. While such interactions are drawn out over billions of years,
    repeated close passages will ultimately create one merged galaxy.
    Although this scenario does look unusual, galactic mergers are thought
    to be common, with Arp 87 representing a stage in this inevitable
    process. The Arp 87 dancing pair are about 300 million light-years
    distant toward the constellation of the Lion (Leo). The prominent
    edge-on spiral galaxy at the far left appears to be a more distant
    background galaxy and not involved in the on-going merger.

    Tomorrow's picture: open space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Oct 25 00:56:48 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 25

    Gone in 60 Seconds: A Green Flash Sunset
    Video Credit & Copyright: Tengyu Cai

    Explanation: In 60 seconds, this setting Sun will turn green. Actually,
    the top of the Sun already appears not only green, but wavey -- along
    with all of its edges. The Sun itself is unchanged -- both effects are
    caused by looking along hot and cold layers in Earth's atmosphere. The
    unusual color is known as a green flash and occurs because these
    atmospheric layers not only shift background images but disperse colors
    into slightly different directions, like a prism. The featured video
    was captured earlier this month off the coast of Hawaii, USA. After
    waiting those 60 seconds, at the video's end, the upper part of the Sun
    seems to hover alone in space, while turning not only green, but blue.
    Then suddenly, the Sun appears to shrink to nothing -- only to return
    tomorrow.

    Tomorrow's picture: open space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Oct 26 01:14:18 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 26

    Orionids in Taurus
    Image Credit & Copyright: David Cortner

    Explanation: History's first known periodic comet, Comet Halley
    (1P/Halley), returns to the inner Solar System every 76 years or so.
    The famous comet made its last appearance to the naked-eye in 1986. But
    dusty debris from Comet Halley can be seen raining through planet
    Earth's skies twice a year during two annual meteor showers, the Eta
    Aquarids in May and the Orionids in October. In fact, an unhurried
    series of exposures captured these two bright meteors, vaporizing bits
    of Halley dust, during the early morning hours of October 23 against a
    starry background along the Taurus molecular cloud. Impacting the
    atmosphere at about 66 kilometers per second their greenish streaks
    point back to the shower's radiant just north of Orion's bright star
    Betelgeuse off the lower left side of the frame. The familiar Pleiades
    star cluster anchors the dusty celestial scene at the right.

    Tomorrow's picture: 2P/Encke
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Oct 27 00:25:50 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 27

    Encke and the Tadpoles
    Image Credit & Copyright: Dan Bartlett

    Explanation: History's second known periodic comet is Comet Encke
    (2P/Encke). As it swings through the inner Solar System, Encke's orbit
    takes it from an aphelion, its greatest distance from the Sun, inside
    the orbit of Jupiter to a perihelion just inside the orbit of Mercury.
    Returning to its perihelion every 3.3 years, Encke has the shortest
    period of the Solar System's major comets. Comet Encke is also
    associated with (at least) two annual meteor showers on planet Earth,
    the North and South Taurids. Both showers are active in late October
    and early November. Their two separate radiants lie near bright star
    Aldebaran in the head-strong constellation Taurus. A faint comet, Encke
    was captured in this telescopic field of view imaged on the morning of
    August 24. Then, Encke's pretty greenish coma was close on the sky to
    the young, embedded star cluster and light-years long, tadpole-shaped
    star-forming clouds in emission nebula IC 410. Now near bright star
    Spica in Virgo Comet Encke passed its 2023 perihelion only five days
    ago, on October 22.

    Tomorrow's picture: mostly a ghostly weekend
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Oct 28 00:49:24 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 28

    The Ghosts of Gamma Cas
    Image Credit & Copyright: Guillaume Gruntz, Jean-Fran+ois Bax

    Explanation: Gamma Cassiopeiae shines high in northern autumn evening
    skies. It's the brightest spiky star in this telescopic field of view
    toward the constellation Cassiopeia. Gamma Cas shares the
    ethereal-looking scene with ghostly interstellar clouds of gas and
    dust, IC 59 (top left) and IC 63. About 600 light-years distant, the
    clouds aren't actually ghosts. They are slowly disappearing though,
    eroding under the influence of energetic radiation from hot and
    luminous gamma Cas. Gamma Cas is physically located only 3 to 4
    light-years from the nebulae. Slightly closer to gamma Cas, IC 63 is
    dominated by red H-alpha light emitted as hydrogen atoms ionized by the
    star's ultraviolet radiation recombine with electrons. Farther from the
    star, IC 59 shows proportionally less H-alpha emission but more of the
    characteristic blue tint of dust reflected star light. The cosmic stage
    spans over 1 degree or 10 light-years at the estimated distance of
    gamma Cas and friends.

    Tomorrow's picture: ghosts of the Cepheus Flare
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Oct 29 00:10:16 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 29
    Two images of a partial lunar eclipse are shown. On the left the image
    is overexposed everywhere except the bottom right where the eclipsed
    part of the Moon is visible. On the right image most of the image is
    normally exposed but the bottom right part is dark. Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    A Partial Lunar Eclipse
    Image Credit & Copyright: Orazio Mezzio

    Explanation: What's happened to the Moon? Within the last day, part of
    the Moon moved through the Earth's shadow. This happens about once or
    twice a year, but not every month since the Moon's orbit around the
    Earth is slightly tilted. Pictured here, the face of a full Hunter's
    Moon is shown twice from Italy during this partial lunar eclipse. On
    the left, most of the Moon appears overexposed except for the eclipsed
    bottom right, which shows some familiar lunar surface details. In
    contrast, on the right, most of the (same) Moon appears normally
    exposed, with the exception of the bottom right, which now appears
    dark. All lunar eclipses are visible from the half of the Earth facing
    the Moon at the time of the eclipse, but this eclipse was visible
    specifically from Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia, clouds
    permitting. In April, a total solar eclipse will be visible from North
    America.

    Album: Selected partial lunar eclipse images sent in to APOD
    Tomorrow's picture: a devil on mars
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Oct 30 00:26:50 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 30
    A dark starfield is shown with several brown nebulas. Many of the
    nebulas appear to have unusual shapes, with one possibly resembling a
    bat, while other may resemble people. Please see the explanation for
    more detailed information.

    Reflections of the Ghost Nebula
    Image Credit & Copyright: Bogdan Jarzyna

    Explanation: Do any shapes seem to jump out at you from this
    interstellar field of stars and dust? The jeweled expanse, filled with
    faint, starlight-reflecting clouds, drifts through the night in the
    royal constellation of Cepheus. Far from your own neighborhood on
    planet Earth, these ghostly apparitions lurk along the plane of the
    Milky Way at the edge of the Cepheus Flare molecular cloud complex some
    1,200 light-years away. Over two light-years across and brighter than
    the other spooky chimeras, VdB 141 or Sh2-136 is also known as the
    Ghost Nebula, seen toward the bottom of the featured image. Within the
    reflection nebula are the telltale signs of dense cores collapsing in
    the early stages of star formation.

    Tour the Universe: Random APOD Generator
    Tomorrow's picture: all hallow's eve
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Oct 31 00:24:16 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 October 31
    The center of the Wizard Nebula is shown featuring gas glowing in red
    and dust reflecting in blue. Dark dust pillars are seen throughout the
    image. Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    Halloween and the Wizard Nebula
    Image Credit & Copyright: Richard McInnis

    Explanation: Halloween's origin is ancient and astronomical. Since the
    fifth century BC, Halloween has been celebrated as a cross-quarter day,
    a day halfway between an equinox (equal day / equal night) and a
    solstice (minimum day / maximum night in the northern hemisphere). With
    a modern calendar however, even though Halloween occurs today, the real
    cross-quarter day will occur next week. Another cross-quarter day is
    Groundhog Day. Halloween's modern celebration retains historic roots in
    dressing to scare away the spirits of the dead. Perhaps a fitting
    tribute to this ancient holiday is this closeup view of the Wizard
    Nebula (NGC 7380). Visually, the interplay of stars, gas, and dust has
    created a shape that appears to some like a fictional ancient sorcerer.
    Although the nebula may last only a few million years, some of the
    stars being conjured from the gas by the great gravitational powers may
    outlive our Sun.

    Tomorrow's picture: sun block
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Nov 1 00:45:14 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 1
    A sequence of Sun and Moon images are shown behind a scenic foreground
    that features the large Factory Butte. The foreground was taken during
    the maximum part of the annular eclipse and seems somehow oddly lit.
    Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    Annular Solar Eclipse over Utah
    Image Credit & Copyright: MaryBeth Kiczenski

    Explanation: Part of the Sun disappeared earlier this month, but few
    people were worried. The missing part, which included the center from
    some locations, just went behind the Moon in what is known as an
    annular solar eclipse. Featured here is an eclipse sequence taken as
    the Moon was overtaking the rising Sun in the sky. The foreground hill
    is Factory Butte in Utah, USA. The rays flaring out from the Sun are
    not real -- they result from camera aperture diffraction and are known
    as sunstar. The Moon is real, but it is artificially brightened to
    enhance its outline -- which helps the viewer better visualize the
    Moon's changing position during this ring-of-fire eclipse. As stunning
    as this eclipse sequence is, it was considered just practice by the
    astrophotographer. The reason? She hopes to use this experience to
    better photograph the total solar eclipse that will occur over North
    America on April 8, 2024.

    Apply today (USA): Become a NASA Partner Eclipse Ambassador
    Eclipse Album: Selected images sent in to APOD
    Tomorrow's picture: open space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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    * Origin: The Rusty MailBox - Penticton, BC Canada (1:153/757)
  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Nov 2 00:29:52 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 2

    The Fornax Cluster of Galaxies
    Image Credit & Copyright: Marcelo Rivera

    Explanation: Named for the southern constellation toward which most of
    its galaxies can be found, the Fornax Cluster is one of the closest
    clusters of galaxies. About 62 million light-years away, it's over 20
    times more distant than our neighboring Andromeda Galaxy, but only
    about 10 percent farther along than the better known and more populated
    Virgo Galaxy Cluster. Seen across this three degree wide field-of-view,
    almost every yellowish splotch on the image is an elliptical galaxy in
    the Fornax cluster. Elliptical galaxies NGC 1399 and NGC 1404 are the
    dominant, bright cluster members toward the bottom center. A standout,
    large barred spiral galaxy, NGC 1365, is visible on the upper right as
    a prominent Fornax cluster member.

    Tomorrow's picture: opposite the Sun
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Nov 3 00:55:12 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 3

    Jupiter by Moonlight
    Image Credit & Copyright: Giorgia Hofer

    Explanation: That bright beacon you've seen rising in the east just
    after sunset is Jupiter. Climbing high in midnight skies, our Solar
    System's ruling gas giant was at its 2023 opposition, opposite the Sun
    in planet Earth's sky, on November 2. But only a few days earlier, on
    October 28, the Moon was at its own opposition. Then both Full Moon and
    Jupiter could share this telephoto field of view. The celestial scene
    is composed from two exposures, one long and one short, blended to
    record bright planet and even brighter Moon during that evening's
    partial lunar eclipse. Moonlight shining through the thin, high clouds
    over northern Italy creates the colorful iridescence and lunar corona.
    Look closely and you'll also spot some of Jupiter's Galilean moons.

    Tomorrow's picture: Jovian close-up
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Nov 4 01:34:18 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 4

    Dinkinesh Moonrise
    Image Credit: NASA/Goddard, SwRI, Johns Hopkins APL, NOIRLab

    Explanation: Last Wednesday the voyaging Lucy spacecraft encountered
    its first asteroid, 152830 Dinkinesh, and discovered the inner-main
    belt asteroid has a moon. From a distance of just over 400 kilometers,
    Lucy's Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager captured this close-up of the
    binary system during a flyby at 4.5 kilometer per second or around
    10,000 miles per hour. A marvelous world, Dinkinesh itself is small,
    less than 800 meters (about 0.5 miles) across at its widest. Its
    satellite is seen from the spacecraft's perspective to emerge from
    behind the primary asteroid. The asteroid moon is estimated to be only
    about 220 meters wide.

    Tomorrow's picture: aurora borealis
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Nov 5 04:34:04 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 5
    The night sky over a snowy tree-adorned landscape glows in green and
    purple. The auroral glow might appear to some to be shaped like a
    creature. Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    Creature Aurora Over Norway
    Image Credit & Copyright: Ole C. Salomonsen (Arctic Light Photo)

    Explanation: It was Halloween and the sky looked like a creature.
    Exactly which creature, the astrophotographer was unsure (but possibly
    you can suggest one). Exactly what caused this eerie apparition in 2013
    was sure: one of the best auroral displays that year. This spectacular
    aurora had an unusually high degree of detail. Pictured here, the vivid
    green and purple auroral colors are caused by high atmospheric oxygen
    and nitrogen reacting to a burst of incoming electrons. Birch trees in
    Troms+., Norway formed an also eerie foreground. Frequently, new
    photogenic auroras accompany new geomagnetic storms.

    Almost Hyperspace: Random APOD Generator
    Tomorrow's picture: devil on mars
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Nov 6 00:03:58 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 6
    The night sky over a valley is shown complete with the central band of
    the Milky Way Galaxy crossing up from the lower left. On the right the
    sky just over the hill glows an unusual red: aurora. Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    Red Aurora over Italy
    Image Credit & Copyright: Giorgia Hofer

    Explanation: What was that red glow on the horizon last night? Aurora.
    Our unusually active Sun produced a surface explosion a few days ago
    that sent out a burst of electrons, protons, and more massive charged
    nuclei. This coronal mass ejection (CME) triggered auroras here on
    Earth that are being reported unusually far south in Earth's northern
    hemisphere. For example, this was the first time that the
    astrophotographer captured aurora from her home country of Italy.
    Additionally, many images from these auroras appear quite red in color.
    In the featured image, the town of Comelico Superiore in the Italian
    Alps is visible in the foreground, with the central band of our Milky
    Way galaxy seen rising from the lower left. What draws the eye the
    most, though, is the bright red aurora on the far right. The featured
    image is a composite with the foreground and background images taken
    consecutively with the same camera and from the same location.

    Aurora Album: Selected images sent in to APOD
    Tomorrow's picture: devil on mars
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Nov 7 00:05:52 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 7

    A Martian Dust Devil Spins By
    Video Credit: NASA, JPL-Caltech, Perseverance Rover; AI processing:
    PipploIMP

    Explanation: It moved across the surface of Mars -- what was it? A dust
    devil. Such spinning columns of rising air are heated by the warm
    surface and are also common in warm and dry areas on planet Earth.
    Typically lasting only a few minutes, dust devils become visible as
    they pick up loose red-colored dust, leaving the darker and heavier
    sand beneath intact. Dust devils not only look cool -- they can leave
    visible trails, and have been credited with unexpected cleanings of the
    surfaces of solar panels. The images in the featured AI-interpolated
    video were captured in early August by the Perseverance rover currently
    searching for signs of ancient life in Jezero Crater. The six-second
    time-lapse video encapsulates a real duration of just over one minute.
    Visible in the distance, the spinning dust devil was estimated to be
    passing by at about 20 kilometers per hour and extend up about 2
    kilometers high.

    Your Sky Surprise: What picture did APOD feature on your birthday?
    (post 1995)
    Tomorrow's picture: a new space telescope
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Nov 8 00:24:08 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 8
    A deep space image showing many galaxies, some of which are seen in a
    central bar running nearly horizontally across the image. Please see
    the explanation for more detailed information.

    Perseus Galaxy Cluster from Euclid
    Image Credit & License: ESA, Euclid, Euclid Consortium, NASA;
    Processing: Jean-Charles Cuillandre (CEA Paris-Saclay) & Giovanni
    Anselmi; Text: Jean-Charles Cuillandre

    Explanation: There's a new space telescope in the sky: Euclid. Equipped
    with two large panoramic cameras, Euclid captures light from the
    visible to the near-infrared. It took five hours of observing for
    Euclid's 1.2-meter diameter primary mirror to capture, through its
    sharp optics, the 1000+ galaxies in the Perseus cluster, which lies 250
    million light years away. More than 100,000 galaxies are visible in the
    background, some as far away as 10 billion light years. The
    revolutionary nature of Euclid lies in the combination of its wide
    field of view (twice the area of the full moon), its high angular
    resolution (thanks to its 620 Megapixel camera), and its infrared
    vision, which captures both images and spectra. Euclid's initial
    surveys, covering a third of the sky and recording over 2 billion
    galaxies, will enable a study of how dark matter and dark energy have
    shaped our universe.

    Tomorrow's picture: M1
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Nov 9 01:15:28 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 9

    M1: The Crab Nebula
    Image Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI; Tea Temim (Princeton University)

    Explanation: The Crab Nebula is cataloged as M1, the first object on
    Charles Messier's famous 18th century list of things which are not
    comets. In fact, the Crab is now known to be a supernova remnant,
    debris from the death explosion of a massive star witnessed by
    astronomers in the year 1054. This sharp image from the James Webb
    Space TelescopeCs NIRCam (Near-Infrared Camera) and MIRI (Mid-Infrared
    Instrument) explores the eerie glow and fragmented strands of the still
    expanding cloud of interstellar debris in infrared light. One of the
    most exotic objects known to modern astronomers, the Crab Pulsar, a
    neutron star spinning 30 times a second, is visible as a bright spot
    near the nebula's center. Like a cosmic dynamo, this collapsed remnant
    of the stellar core powers the Crab's emission across the
    electromagnetic spectrum. Spanning about 12 light-years, the Crab
    Nebula is a mere 6,500 light-years away in the head-strong
    constellation Taurus.

    Tomorrow's picture: UHZ1
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Nov 10 05:30:20 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 10

    UHZ1: Distant Galaxy and Black Hole
    Image Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO/+kos Bogd+n; Infrared:
    NASA/ESA/CSA/STScI;
    Image Processing: NASA/CXC/SAO/L. Frattare & K. Arcand

    Explanation: Dominated by dark matter, massive cluster of galaxies
    Abell 2744 is known to some as Pandora's Cluster. It lies 3.5 billion
    light-years away toward the constellation Sculptor. Using the galaxy
    cluster's enormous mass as a gravitational lens to warp spacetime and
    magnify even more distant objects directly behind it, astronomers have
    found a background galaxy, UHZ1, at a remarkable redshift of Z=10.1.
    That puts UHZ1 far beyond Abell 2744, at a distance of 13.2 billion
    light-years, seen when our universe was about 3 percent of its current
    age. UHZ1 is identified in the insets of this composited image
    combining X-rays (purple hues) from the spacebased Chandra X-ray
    Observatory and infrared light from the James Webb Space Telescope. The
    X-ray emission from UHZ1 detected in the Chandra data is the telltale
    signature of a growing supermassive black hole at the center of the
    ultra high redshift galaxy. That makes UHZ1's growing black hole the
    most distant black hole ever detected in X-rays, a result that now
    hints at how and when the first supermassive black holes in the
    universe formed.

    Tomorrow's picture: light-weekend
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Nov 11 00:18:42 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 11

    The SAR and the Milky Way
    Image Credit & Copyright: Julien Looten

    Explanation: This broad, luminous red arc was a surprising visitor to
    partly cloudy evening skies over northern France. Captured extending
    toward the zenith in a west-to-east mosaic of images from November 5,
    the faint atmospheric ribbon of light is an example of a Stable Auroral
    Red (SAR) arc. The rare night sky phenomenon was also spotted at
    unusually low latitudes around world, along with more dynamic auroral
    displays during an intense geomagnetic storm. SAR arcs and their
    relation to auroral emission have been explored by citizen science and
    satellite investigations. From altitudes substantially above the normal
    auroral glow, the deep red SAR emission is thought to be caused by
    strong heating due to currents flowing in planet Earth's inner
    magnetosphere. Beyond this SAR, the Milky Way arcs above the cloud
    banks along the horizon, a regular visitor to night skies over northern
    France.

    Tomorrow's picture: snow day
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Nov 12 00:16:26 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 12
    A mostly full moon is seen over a snowy sloping hill. An airplane and
    contrail are seen just about the Moon. Please see the explanation for
    more detailed information.

    Gibbous Moon beyond Swedish Mountain
    Image Credit & Copyright: G++ran Strand

    Explanation: This is a gibbous Moon. More Earthlings are familiar with
    a full moon, when the entire face of Luna is lit by the Sun, and a
    crescent moon, when only a sliver of the Moon's face is lit. When more
    than half of the Moon is illuminated, though, but still short of full
    illumination, the phase is called gibbous. Rarely seen in television
    and movies, gibbous moons are quite common in the actual night sky. The
    featured image was taken in J+mtland, Sweden near the end of 2018
    October. That gibbous moon turned, in a few days, into a crescent moon,
    and then a new moon, then back to a crescent, and a few days past that,
    back to gibbous. Setting up to capture a picturesque gibbous moonscape,
    the photographer was quite surprised to find an airplane, surely well
    in the foreground, appearing to fly past it.

    Almost Hyperspace: Random APOD Generator
    Tomorrow's picture: galaxy mountain
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Nov 13 00:41:32 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 13
    The night sky over a snowy mountain is shown, with the dark sky
    dominated by a large spiral galaxy -- the Andromeda galaxy. Please see
    the explanation for more detailed information.

    Andromeda over the Alps
    Image Credit & Copyright: Dzmitry Kananovich

    Explanation: Have you ever seen the Andromeda galaxy? Although M31
    appears as a faint and fuzzy blob to the unaided eye, the light you see
    will be over two million years old, making it likely the oldest light
    you ever will see directly. The featured image captured Andromeda just
    before it set behind the Swiss Alps early last year. As cool as it may
    be to see this neighboring galaxy to our Milky Way with your own eyes,
    long duration camera exposures can pick up many faint and breathtaking
    details. The image is composite of foreground and background images
    taken consecutively with the same camera and from the same location.
    Recent data indicate that our Milky Way Galaxy will collide and
    coalesce with Andromeda galaxy in a few billion years.

    Follow APOD on Facebook in: Arabic, English, Catalan, Portuguese, or
    Taiwanese
    Tomorrow's picture: planets rock
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Nov 14 00:38:58 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 14
    A seascape surrounds a large tree-covered hill. Surrounding the hill in
    the night sky are three bright dots: the planets Jupiter, Venus, and a
    crescent Moon. Please see the explanation for more detailed
    information.

    Three Planets Rock
    Image Credit & Copyright: Giovanni Passalacqua; Text: Liz Coelho (Pikes
    Peak)

    Explanation: In the fading darkness before dawn, a tilted triangle
    appeared to balance atop a rock formation off the southern tip of
    Sicily. Making up the points of the triangle are three of the four
    brightest objects visible in EarthCs sky: Jupiter, Venus and the Moon.
    Though a thin waning crescent, most of the moonCs disk is visible due
    to earthshine. Captured in this image on 2022 April 27, Venus (center)
    and Jupiter (left) are roughly three degrees apart -- and were headed
    toward a close conjunction. Conjunctions of Venus and Jupiter occur
    about once a year and are visible either in the east before sunrise or
    in the west after sunset. The featured image was taken about an hour
    before the arrival of the brightest object in EarthCs sky C the Sun.

    Tomorrow's picture: open space
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Nov 15 00:05:36 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 15
    The Crab Nebula, M1, is shown as imaged by the James Webb Space
    Telescope. The rollover image is the same Crab Nebula but this time
    from the Hubble Space Telescope. The Webb image is in near infrared
    light, while the Hubble image is in visible light. Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    M1: The Incredible Expanding Crab
    Image Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI; Jeff Hester (ASU), Allison Loll
    (ASU), Tea Temim (Princeton University)

    Explanation: Cataloged as M1, the Crab Nebula is the first on Charles
    Messier's famous list
    of things which are not comets. In fact, the Crab Nebula is now known
    to be a supernova remnant, an expanding cloud of debris from the death
    explosion of a massive star. The violent birth of the Crab was
    witnessed by astronomers in the year 1054. Roughly 10 light-years
    across, the nebula is still expanding at a rate of about 1,500
    kilometers per second. You can see the expansion by comparing these
    sharp images from the Hubble Space Telescope and James Webb Space
    Telescope. The Crab's dynamic, fragmented filaments were captured in
    visible light by Hubble in 2005 and Webb in infrared light in 2023.
    This cosmic crustacean lies about 6,500 light-years away in the
    constellation Taurus.

    Tomorrow's picture: daytime Moon, morning star
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Nov 16 04:55:30 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 16

    Daytime Moon Meets Morning Star
    Image Credit & Copyright: Katarzyna Kaczmarczyk

    Explanation: Venus now appears as Earth's brilliant morning star,
    shining above the southeastern horizon before dawn. For early morning
    risers, the silvery celestial beacon rose predawn in a close pairing
    with a waning crescent Moon on Thursday, November 9. But from some
    northern locations, the Moon was seen to occult or pass in front of
    Venus. From much of Europe, the lunar occultation could be viewed in
    daylight skies. This time series composite follows the daytime approach
    of Moon and morning star in blue skies from Warsaw, Poland. The
    progression of eight sharp telescopic snapshots, made between 10:56am
    and 10:58am local time, runs from left to right, when Venus winked out
    behind the bright lunar limb.

    Tomorrow's picture: Aurora over Greenland
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
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    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Nov 17 00:33:20 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 17

    Nightlights in Qeqertaq
    Image Credit & Copyright: Dennis Lehtonen

    Explanation: Light pollution is usually not a problem in Qeqertaq. In
    western Greenland the remote coastal village boasted a population of
    114 in 2020. Lights still shine in its dark skies though. During planet
    Earth's recent intense geomagnetic storm
    , on November 6 these beautiful curtains of aurora borealis fell over
    the arctic realm. On the eve of the coming weeks of polar night at 70
    degrees north latitude, the inspiring display of northern lights is
    reflected in the waters of Disko Bay. In this view from the isolated
    settlement a lone iceberg is illuminated by shore lights as it drifts
    across the icy sea.

    Weekend Watch: The Leonid Meteor Shower.
    Tomorrow's picture: Artemis Anniversary
    __________________________________________________________________

    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
    NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.
    NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important Notices
    A service of: ASD at NASA / GSFC,
    NASA Science Activation
    & Michigan Tech. U.

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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Nov 18 01:08:08 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 18

    Planet Earth from Orion
    Image Credit: NASA, Artemis I

    Explanation: One year ago a Space Launch System rocket left planet
    Earth on November 16, 2022 at 1:47am EST carrying the Orion spacecraft
    on the Artemis I mission, the first integrated test of NASACs deep
    space exploration systems. Over an hour after liftoff from Kennedy
    Space Center's historic Launch Complex 39B, one of Orion's external
    video cameras captured this view of its new perspective from space. In
    the foreground are Orion's Orbital Maneuvering System engine and
    auxillary engines, at the bottom of the European Service Module. Beyond
    one of the module's 7-meter long extended solar array wings lies the
    spacecraft's beautiful home world. Making close flybys of the lunar
    surface and reaching a retrograde orbit 70,000 kilometers beyond the
    Moon, the uncrewed Artemis I mission lasted over 25 days, testing
    capabilities to enable human exploration of the Moon and Mars. Building
    on the success of Artemis I, no earlier than November 2024 the Artemis
    II mission with a crew of 4 will venture around the Moon and back
    again.

    Tomorrow's picture: Sun day
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Nov 19 02:12:52 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 19
    A silhouette of the International Space Station (ISS) is pictured in
    front the top of the Sun, shown with great detail. An inset image shows
    where on the ISS the Dragon capsule is docked. Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    Space Station, Solar Prominences, Sun
    Image Credit & Copyright: Mehmet Ergu+n

    Explanation: That's no sunspot. It's the International Space Station
    (ISS) caught passing in front of the Sun. Sunspots, individually, have
    a dark central umbra, a lighter surrounding penumbra, and no Dragon
    capsules attached. By contrast, the ISS is a complex and multi-spired
    mechanism, one of the largest and most complicated spacecraft ever
    created by humanity. Also, sunspots circle the Sun, whereas the ISS
    orbits the Earth. Transiting the Sun is not very unusual for the ISS,
    which orbits the Earth about every 90 minutes, but getting one's
    location, timing and equipment just right for a great image is rare.
    The featured picture combined three images all taken in 2021 from the
    same location and at nearly the same time. One image -- overexposed --
    captured the faint prominences seen across the top of the Sun, a second
    image -- underexposed -- captured the complex texture of the Sun's
    chromosphere, while the third image -- the hardest to get -- captured
    the space station as it shot across the Sun in a fraction of a second.
    Close inspection of the space station's silhouette even reveals a
    docked Dragon Crew capsule.

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    Tomorrow's picture: dark horse
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Nov 20 00:07:50 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 20
    A dark nebula resembling the head of a horse is imaged before a
    red-glowing background. Stars appear throughout the image. Please see
    the explanation for more detailed information.

    The Horsehead Nebula
    Image Credit & Copyright: Mark Hanson & Martin Pugh, SSRO, PROMPT,
    CTIO, NSF

    Explanation: Sculpted by stellar winds and radiation, a magnificent
    interstellar dust cloud by chance has assumed this recognizable shape.
    Fittingly named the Horsehead Nebula, it is some 1,500 light-years
    distant, embedded in the vast Orion cloud complex. About five
    light-years "tall," the dark cloud is cataloged as Barnard 33 and is
    visible only because its obscuring dust is silhouetted against the
    glowing red emission nebula IC 434. Stars are forming within the dark
    cloud. Contrasting blue reflection nebula NGC 2023, surrounding a hot,
    young star, is at the lower left of the full image. The featured
    gorgeous color image combines both narrowband and broadband images
    recorded using several different telescopes.

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    Tomorrow's picture: supernova wisp
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    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Nov 21 00:09:30 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 21
    A nebula consisting of blue and red wisps starts thin at the image
    bottom but expands into a triangle at the image top. Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    Fleming's Triangular Wisp
    Image Credit & Copyright: Cristiano Gualco

    Explanation: These chaotic and tangled filaments of shocked, glowing
    gas are spread across planet Earth's sky toward the constellation of
    Cygnus as part of the Veil Nebula. The Veil Nebula itself is a large
    supernova remnant, an expanding cloud born of the death explosion of a
    massive star. Light from the original supernova explosion likely
    reached Earth over 5,000 years ago. The glowing filaments are really
    more like long ripples in a sheet seen almost edge on, remarkably well
    separated into the glow of ionized hydrogen atoms shown in red and
    oxygen in blue hues. Also known as the Cygnus Loop and cataloged as NGC
    6979, the Veil Nebula now spans about 6 times the diameter of the full
    Moon. The length of the wisp corresponds to about 30 light years, given
    its estimated distance of 2,400 light years. Often identified as
    Pickering's Triangle for a director of Harvard College Observatory, it
    is perhaps better named for its discoverer, astronomer Williamina
    Fleming, as Fleming's Triangular Wisp.

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    Tomorrow's picture: open space
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    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Nov 22 04:23:10 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 22

    IC 342: Hidden Galaxy in Camelopardalis
    Image Credit & Copyright: Steve Cannistra

    Explanation: Similar in size to large, bright spiral galaxies in our
    neighborhood, IC 342 is a mere 10 million light-years distant in the
    long-necked, northern constellation Camelopardalis. A sprawling island
    universe, IC 342 would otherwise be a prominent galaxy in our night
    sky, but it is hidden from clear view and only glimpsed through the
    veil of stars, gas and dust clouds along the plane of our own Milky Way
    galaxy. Even though IC 342's light is dimmed and reddened by
    intervening cosmic clouds, this sharp telescopic image traces the
    galaxy's own obscuring dust, young star clusters, and glowing star
    forming regions along spiral arms that wind far from the galaxy's core.
    IC 342 has undergone a recent burst of star formation activity and is
    close enough to have gravitationally influenced the evolution of the
    local group of galaxies and the Milky Way.

    Tomorrow's picture: pixels in space
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    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Thu Nov 23 04:11:44 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 23

    Along the Taurus Molecular Cloud
    Image Credit & Copyright: Yuexiao Shen, Joe Hua

    Explanation: The cosmic brush of star formation composed this
    interstellar canvas of emission, dust, and dark nebulae. A 5 degree
    wide telescopic mosaic, it frames a region found north of bright star
    Aldebaran on the sky, at an inner wall of the local bubble along the
    Taurus molecular cloud. At lower left, emission cataloged as Sh2-239
    shows signs of embedded young stellar objects. The region's Herbig-Haro
    objects, nebulosities associated with newly born stars, are marked by
    tell-tale reddish jets of shocked hydrogen gas. Above and right T
    Tauri, the prototype of the class of T Tauri variable stars, is next to
    a yellowish nebula historically known as Hind's Variable Nebula (NGC
    1555). T Tauri stars are now generally recognized as young, less than a
    few million years old, sun-like stars still in the early stages of
    formation.

    Tomorrow's picture: Stereo Jupiter
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Fri Nov 24 01:46:40 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 24

    Stereo Jupiter near Opposition
    Image Credit & Copyright: Marco Lorenzi

    Explanation: Jupiter looks sharp in these two rooftop telescope images.
    Both were captured on November 17 from Singapore, planet Earth, about
    two weeks after Jupiter's 2023 opposition. Climbing high in midnight
    skies the giant planet was a mere 33.4 light-minutes from Singapore.
    That's about 4 astronomical units away. Jupiter's planet girdling dark
    belts and light zones are visible in remarkable detail, along with the
    giant world's whitish oval vortices. Its signature Great Red Spot is
    still prominent in the south. Jupiter rotates rapidly on its axis once
    every 10 hours. So, based on video frames taken only 15 minutes apart,
    these images form a stereo pair. Look at the center of the pair and
    cross your eyes until the separate images come together to see the
    Solar System's ruling gas giant in 3D.

    Tomorrow's picture: light-weekend
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    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sat Nov 25 08:14:50 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 25

    Little Planet Aurora
    Image Credit & Copyright: Victor Lima

    Explanation: Immersed in an eerie greenish light, this rugged little
    planet appears to be home to stunning water falls and an impossibly
    tall mountain. It's planet Earth of course. On the night of November 9
    the nadir-centered 360 degree mosaic was captured by digital camera
    from the Kirkjufell mountain area of western Iceland. Curtains of
    shimmering Aurora Borealis or Northern Lights provide the pale greenish
    illumination. The intense auroral display was caused by solar activity
    that rocked Earth's magnetosphere in early November and produced strong
    geomagnetic storms. Kirkjufell mountain itself stands at the top of the
    stereographic projection's circular horizon. Northern hemisphere
    skygazers will recognize the familiar stars of the Big Dipper just
    above Kirkjufell's peak. At lower right the compact Pleiades star
    cluster and truly giant planet Jupiter also shine in this little
    planet's night sky.

    Tomorrow's picture: The Surface of 67P
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    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Sun Nov 26 00:22:26 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 26
    A dark and jagged hill is shown strewn with rocks. On the slope is a
    white foggy area that appears to emanate from a non-descript place on
    the rock face. Please see the explanation for more detailed
    information.

    A Dust Jet from the Surface of Comet 67P
    Image Credit: ESA, Rosetta, MPS, OSIRIS;
    UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

    Explanation: Where do comet tails come from? There are no obvious
    places on the nuclei of comets from which the jets that create comet
    tails emanate. In 2016, though, ESA's Rosetta spacecraft not only
    imaged a jet emerging from Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, but flew
    right through it. Featured is a telling picture showing a bright plume
    emerging from a small circular dip bounded on one side by a 10-meter
    high wall. Analyses of Rosetta data show that the jet was composed of
    both dust and water-ice. The rugged but otherwise unremarkable terrain
    indicates that something likely happened far under the porous surface
    to create the plume. This image was taken about two months before
    Rosetta's mission ended with a controlled impact onto Comet 67P's
    surface.

    Tomorrow's picture: eagle ray
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    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Mon Nov 27 06:17:12 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 27
    A light brown nebula is seen on a dark starfield. The outline of the
    nebula makes it appear like an eagle ray fish. Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    LBN 86: The Eagle Ray Nebula
    Image Credit & Copyright: Vikas Chander

    Explanation: This eagle ray glides across a cosmic sea. Officially
    cataloged as SH2-63 and LBN 86, the dark nebula is composed of gas and
    dust that just happens to appear shaped like a common ocean fish. The
    interstellar dust nebula appears light brown as it blocks and reddens
    visible light emitted behind it. Dark nebulas glow primarily in
    infrared light, but also reflect visible light from surrounding stars.
    The dust in dark nebulas is usually sub-millimeter chunks of carbon,
    silicon, and oxygen, frequently coated with frozen carbon monoxide and
    nitrogen. Dark nebulas are also known as molecular clouds because they
    also contain relatively high amounts of molecular hydrogen and larger
    molecules. Previously unnamed, the here dubbed Eagle Ray Nebula is
    normally quite dim but has been imaged clearly over 20-hours through
    dark skies in Chile.

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    Tomorrow's picture: largest moon
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    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Tue Nov 28 07:48:08 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 28
    A tan sphere is shown with dark markings and a few light craters. The
    sphere is the largest known moon in the Solar System: Jupiter's moon
    Ganymede. Please see the explanation for more detailed information.

    Ganymede from Juno
    Image Credit & Copyright: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS; Processing &
    License: Kevin M. Gill;

    Explanation: What does the largest moon in the Solar System look like?
    Jupiter's moon Ganymede, larger than even Mercury and Pluto, has an icy
    surface speckled with bright young craters overlying a mixture of
    older, darker, more cratered terrain laced with grooves and ridges. The
    cause of the grooved terrain remains a topic of research, with a
    leading hypothesis relating it to shifting ice plates. Ganymede is
    thought to have an ocean layer that contains more water than Earth --
    and might contain life. Like Earth's Moon, Ganymede keeps the same face
    towards its central planet, in this case Jupiter. The featured image
    was captured in 2021 by NASA's robotic Juno spacecraft when it passed
    by the immense moon. The close pass reduced Juno's orbital period
    around Jupiter from 53 days to 43 days. Juno continues to study the
    giant planet's high gravity, unusual magnetic field, and complex cloud
    structures.

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    Tomorrow's picture: double twister
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    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
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  • From Alan Ianson@1:153/757 to All on Wed Nov 29 01:03:32 2023
    Astronomy Picture of the Day

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our
    fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation
    written by a professional astronomer.

    2023 November 29
    A funnel cloud is shown, but inside what appears to be a wider funnel
    cloud. A blue sky with a few white clouds is seen in the background,
    while flat plains are seen in the foreground. Please see the
    explanation for more detailed information.

    A Landspout Tornado over Kansas
    Image Credit & Copyright: Brad Hannon

    Explanation: Could there be a tornado inside another tornado? In
    general, no. OK, but could there be a tornado inside a wider dust
    devil? No again, for one reason because tornados comes down from the
    sky, but dust devils rise up from the ground. What is pictured is a
    landspout, an unusual type of tornado known to occur on the edge of a
    violent thunderstorm. The featured landspout was imaged and identified
    in Kansas, USA, in June 2019 by an experienced storm chaser. The real
    tornado is in the center, and the outer sheath was possibly created by
    large dust particles thrown out from the central tornado. So far, the
    only planet known to create tornados is Earth, although tornado-like
    activity has been found on the Sun and dust devils are common on Mars.

    Almost Hyperspace: Random APOD Generator
    Tomorrow's picture: Flight Day 13
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    Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)
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